New York Times: When Facebook Spread Hate, One Cop Tried Something Unusual

New York Times: When Facebook Spread Hate, One Cop Tried Something Unusual. “In most of the world, rumor-fueled meltdowns are taken as a fact of life, a product of Facebook’s propensity for stirring up people’s worst impulses. But Andreas Guske, a trim, steely-eyed police inspector in the refugee-heavy Bavarian town of Traunstein where the rumor circulated, didn’t think his community could afford complacence. Attacks on refugees were already rising. And southern Germany is a front line in Europe’s battle over identity and immigration.”

CBC: Twitter trolls stoked debates about immigrants and pipelines in Canada, data show

CBC: Twitter trolls stoked debates about immigrants and pipelines in Canada, data show. “Twitter trolls linked to suspected foreign influence campaigns stoked controversy over pipelines and immigration in Canada, according to a CBC/Radio-Canada analysis of 9.6 million tweets from accounts since deleted. Roughly 21,600 tweets from those troll accounts directly targeted Canadians — many of them with messages critical of Canadian pipeline projects and tweets that highlighted divisions over Canada’s policies on immigration and refugees.”

CBC: Immigration Minister Hussen impersonated in refugee scam

CBC: Immigration Minister Hussen impersonated in refugee scam. “A brash new scam on social media hijacked the identity of Canada’s immigration minister to defraud desperate refugees of thousands of dollars. The fake Facebook profile of Ahmed Hussen spelled his last name with one ‘s’ but used the same photos the minister has on his official Facebook page. The account’s information was written in Arabic and English.”

INSIDER: Asylum-seekers fleeing the US for Canada are figuring out how to do it by watching YouTube videos and scanning social media

INSIDER: Asylum-seekers fleeing the US for Canada are figuring out how to do it by watching YouTube videos and scanning social media. “Reinel Alfonso stepped out of the taxi and took in his surroundings. The dead-end road, lined with signs warning him to ‘Stop’ before entering an ‘illegal border crossing,’ looked exactly as it had in the videos he’d seen on the internet. Alfonso told INSIDER he flew to the United States from Bogota, Colombia, nearly 3,000 miles away. He was here in rural, upstate New York, just feet from the Canadian border, to try to save his own life.”

San Diego State University: SDSU Library Archive Details Detainee’s Path to Seeking Asylum, Conditions Inside Detention

San Diego State University: SDSU Library Archive Details Detainee’s Path to Seeking Asylum, Conditions Inside Detention. “What began as a casual gathering of friends has become a first-of-its-kind living archive of handwritten letters shared by hundreds of asylum seekers detained along the U.S.-Mexico border. Those letters, in the collective correspondence, provide a detailed description of each person’s path to pursuing asylum, and the conditions inside detention centers.”

Gizmodo: ACLU is Suing the Federal Government for Information About Social Media Surveillance Practices

Gizmodo: ACLU Is Suing the Federal Government for Information About Social Media Surveillance Practices. “The American Civil Liberties Union Foundation filed a lawsuit in the Northern District of California against the federal government on Thursday over its social media surveillance practices, specifically relating to the Trump administration’s controversial immigration policy known as ‘extreme vetting.'”

The Atlantic: The Meme-ification of Asianness

The Atlantic: The Meme-ification of Asianness. “Early every Sunday growing up in Australia, Anne Gu attended Chinese school, the weekend classes where many children of Chinese immigrants learn Mandarin. There, she bonded with her classmates over their shared sense of obligation…. They kept in touch via group chat, exchanging jokes about life as first-generation Asian Australians. ‘Someone was like, it would be fun if we made a Facebook group, and we all agreed,’ Gu said. In September, she and her friends created a group and added ‘all the Asian friends’ on their Facebook friend lists. They called it Subtle Asian Traits, after a then-popular Facebook group among Aussie teens called Subtle Private School Traits.”