Digital Library of Georgia: Oral histories from Chinese-Americans living in Augusta now available

Digital Library of Georgia: Oral histories from Chinese-Americans living in Augusta now available. “The Digital Library of Georgia (DLG) is pleased to announce the availability of the Augusta Chinese-American Oral History Project… The collection, which belongs to the Augusta-Richmond County Public Library System (ARCPLS), contains 26 oral history interviews of of individuals who either immigrated to Augusta, Georgia from China, and/or grew up in Augusta during the early to mid-twentieth century.”

St. Olaf College: Website created at St. Olaf provides resources on rural immigration

St. Olaf College: Website created at St. Olaf provides resources on rural immigration. “Nearly a decade ago, St. Olaf College Professor of Political Science Kathy Tegtmeyer Pak began pairing students in her Immigration and Citizenship course with organizations working to integrate immigrants into rural communities. Students conducted interviews with the organizations, consulted with experts, and reviewed the latest research on immigration to rural parts of the United States, which has increased dramatically over the past two decades. What, they asked local leaders, should — and could — their community do to welcome immigrants?”

Nieman Journalism Lab: Is there really data that heavy Facebook use caused…erm, is correlated with…erm, is linked to real-life hate crimes?

Nieman Journalism Lab: Is there really data that heavy Facebook use caused…erm, is correlated with…erm, is linked to real-life hate crimes?. “It’s a narrative that feels right — there’s a lot of hateful shit posted on Facebook, and that avalanche of content eventually whips up very engaged users into a hateful frenzy that pushes them over the edge in real life. The Times story has real anecdotes of people going through this transformation, and others witnessing these transformations in their communities. But it leans on this working paper to neaten the narrative, and reality is anything but neat.”

Poynter: Here’s how an anti-refugee hoax went viral across Europe

Poynter: Here’s how an anti-refugee hoax went viral across Europe. “It was one of the biggest hoaxes in Europe this week — and a prime example of how hyperpartisan groups regularly take footage out of context. A minute-long video, now removed from YouTube, shows a group of veiled women in the water and a production crew standing on the beach. In Czech, a male voice claims that a TV news crew is staging a scene of drowning migrants on a beach in Ierapetra, Crete, in late July.” Because I don’t want to be part of the problem, let me add that this was absolutely not what the video was about. Please read the story for more.

Lost on the border: A decade later, a man finds his father’s remains on Facebook (Reveal)

Reveal: Lost on the border: A decade later, a man finds his father’s remains on Facebook. “Eliseo Cárdenas Sánchez was browsing Facebook late one night in March when he landed on a series of photos: snapshots of his father’s identification card and a small pile of bones. Cárdenas Sánchez suddenly realized he likely was looking at all that was left of his father, Eliseo Cárdenas Zetina, who disappeared after trying to cross the U.S.-Mexico border in 2008.” Please be warned that this article includes graphic images of human remains.

TechCrunch: Study ties Facebook engagement to attacks on refugees

TechCrunch: Study ties Facebook engagement to attacks on refugees. “A study of circumstances and demographics attendant on attacks against refugees and immigrants in Germany has shown that Facebook use appears to be deeply linked with the frequency of violent acts. Far from being mere trolling or isolated expressions of controversial political opinions, spikes in anti-refugee posts were predictive of violent crimes against those groups.”

FamilySearch: Expanded Ellis Island Immigrant Records 1820-1957 Online

FamilySearch: Expanded Ellis Island Immigrant Records 1820-1957 Online. “What do over a 100 million Americans have in common? Their ancestors immigrated through Ellis Island or one of the New York Harbor immigration stations that preceded it. FamilySearch and The Statue of Liberty-Ellis Island Foundation, Inc. announced today the entire collection of Ellis Island New York Passenger Arrival Lists from 1820 to 1957 are now available online on both websites giving the opportunity to the descendants of over 100 million arrivals to discover their ancestors quicker and free of charge.”