PR Newswire: A new open-access portal for human immunology data and tools (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: A new open-access portal for human immunology data and tools (PRESS RELEASE). “Launched today, the Human Immune System Explorer is the Allen Institute for Immunology’s data-sharing portal to the broader community. Built using de-identified and anonymized data, the site allows scientists to delve into the methods and resources the immunology team is using to analyze and manage their studies on human immunology. As the team’s long-term studies of immune health and diseases are completed, those data will be deposited on the public portal as well.”

University of Washington: Model finds COVID-19 deaths among elderly may be due to genetic limit on cell division

University of Washington: Model finds COVID-19 deaths among elderly may be due to genetic limit on cell division. “Your immune system’s ability to combat COVID-19, like any infection, largely depends on its ability to replicate the immune cells effective at destroying the SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes the disease. These cloned immune cells cannot be infinitely created, and a key hypothesis of a new University of Washington study is that the body’s ability to create these cloned cells falls off significantly in old age.”

BBC: Covid trapped me at home for more than seven months

BBC: Covid trapped me at home for more than seven months. “Ian [Lester] was born with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, which makes it harder for him to fight off infections. Even a common cold can linger. He shielded during the first wave of Covid, but coronavirus eventually found him in December 2020. He had one of the classic symptoms – a slight loss of sense of taste and smell – which cleared up within a month. For most of us that would be the end of it, but Ian’s Covid journey was only just beginning.”

Newswise: Penn Study Details Robust T-Cell Response to mRNA COVID-19 Vaccines—a More Durable Source of Protection

Newswise: Penn Study Details Robust T-Cell Response to mRNA COVID-19 Vaccines—a More Durable Source of Protection. “Messenger-RNA (mRNA) vaccines against the coronavirus that causes COVID-19 provoke a swift and strong response by the immune system’s T cells—the heavy armor of the immune system—according to a study from researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Although recent studies of vaccines tend to focus on the antibody response, the T-cell response is also an important and potentially more durable source of protection—yet little has been reported so far on the T-cell response to COVID-19 vaccines.”

Technology Networks: Database Offers Access to 200 Million Immune Sequences From COVID-19 Patients

Technology Networks: Database Offers Access to 200 Million Immune Sequences From COVID-19 Patients. “Across the world, many laboratories are conducting research relating to the SARS-CoV-2 virus, whether it be to understand the pathophysiology of COVID-19, or to develop robust diagnostics and efficacious therapeutics for the disease. As such, the pandemic has highlighted the critical importance of data sharing within the scientific community. The iReceptor Plus consortium, a European Union (EU)- and Canadian-funded project, has gathered 200 million T and B cell receptor sequences from COVID-19 patients – it is the largest repertoire of its kind. The sequencing data is open source and available online through the iReceptor Gateway.”

Bloomberg: Covid Antibodies Fade Rapidly, Raising Risk of Lost Immunity

Bloomberg: Covid Antibodies Fade Rapidly, Raising Risk of Lost Immunity. “Recovering from Covid-19 may not offer much lasting protection from future infections for those with only mild cases, according to a report that suggests caution regarding so-called herd immunity as well as the durability of vaccines. The correspondence in the New England Journal of Medicine outlined research on antibodies taken from the blood of 34 patients who had recovered after suffering mainly mild symptoms that didn’t require intensive care. Just two needed supplemental oxygen and received an HIV medication, and none were on a ventilator or getting Gilead Sciences Inc.’s remdesivir.”

The Atlantic: How Long Does COVID-19 Immunity Last?

The Atlantic: How Long Does COVID-19 Immunity Last?. “Terrified, I read the study that launched a thousand headlines—and did not come away much less terrified. Researchers at King’s College London had tested more than 90 people with COVID-19 repeatedly from March to June. Several weeks after infection, their blood was swimming with antibodies, which are virus-fighting proteins. But two months later, many of these antibodies had disappeared…. I called several scientists to talk me through the study and ease my apocalyptic anxiety. Their response: Please calm down—but don’t expect us to make you feel entirely relaxed.”

Ars Technica: Beyond antibodies, the immune response to coronavirus is complicated

Ars Technica: Beyond antibodies, the immune response to coronavirus is complicated. “Ultimately, the only way for societies to return to some semblance of normal in the wake of the current pandemic is to reach a state called herd immunity. This is where a large-enough percentage of the population has acquired immunity to SARS-CoV-2—either through infection or a vaccine—that most people exposed to the virus are already immune to it. This will mean that the infection rate will slow and eventually fizzle out, protecting society as a whole. Given that this is our ultimate goal, we need to understand how the immune system responds to this virus.”

Institute for Bioscience and Biotechnology Research: IBBR Researchers Release New Database to Support Immunology Research

Institute for Bioscience and Biotechnology Research: IBBR Researchers Release New Database to Support Immunology Research. “IBBR Fellow Dr. Brian Pierce (Assistant Professor, UMCP Department of Cell Biology and Molecular Genetics) and postdoctoral associate Dr. Ragul Gowthaman recently released a new tool for researchers who study immune system proteins. The TCR3d database contains all known T cell receptor (TCR) structures and is updated weekly.”