Solitary Watch: New Report And Public Database Track Legislation To Limit Or End Solitary Confinement

Solitary Watch: New Report And Public Database Track Legislation To Limit Or End Solitary Confinement . “The first-of-its-kind report utilizes new data made available through the Unlock The Box Legislation Tracker, an interactive database of solitary confinement bills from 2009 to present day. Justice advocates, government officials and policy makers, and public citizens can freely access the Legislation Tracker to review state by state proposals and actions, as well as trend-based data visualizations.”

The Marshall Project: The Many Ingenious Ways People in Prison Use (Forbidden) Cell Phones

The Marshall Project: The Many Ingenious Ways People in Prison Use (Forbidden) Cell Phones. “…most of what I knew about illicit electronics came from press releases and news stories that offered example after example of all the bad things people could do with contraband phones, things like trafficking drugs, making threats and running scams. While it’s true those things can happen, over the past three years I’ve also seen a lot of people use their phones for good. Some use them to self-publish books or take online college classes. Others become prison reform advocates, teach computer skills, trade bitcoin or write legal briefs.”

Oklahoma Department of Libraries: The archivists at the Oklahoma Department of Libraries digitized 285 prisoner newsletters, spanning from 1937 to 1973, for you to view online.

Oklahoma Department of Libraries: The archivists at the Oklahoma Department of Libraries digitized 285 prisoner newsletters, spanning from 1937 to 1973, for you to view online.. “The newsletters were written by the inmates at the Oklahoma State Penitentiary and Oklahoma State Reformatory. The collection consists of five different newsletters: The Eye Opener, Soonerland, Tidings, Granite Nugget, and the OSR News & Views.”

The Marshall Project: The Books Banned in Your State’s Prisons

The Marshall Project: The Books Banned in Your State’s Prisons. “Over the past year, reporters for The Marshall Project asked every state prison system for book policies and lists of banned publications. About half of the states said they kept such lists, which contained more than 50,000 titles. We’ve created a searchable database so you can see for yourself which books prisons don’t want incarcerated people to read.”

Detroit Free Press: New Wayne County Jail dashboard offers statistics, charts in push for transparency

Detroit Free Press: New Wayne County Jail dashboard offers statistics, charts in push for transparency . Wayne County is the most populous county in Michigan, with just under 1.8 million people. Its county seat is Detroit. “The Wayne County Sheriff’s Office and the Detroit Wayne Integrated Health Network on Thursday morning announced the launch of a free, online database providing demographic figures, mental health data and other information on the county jail population.”

Washington Post: They’re locked up in D.C. — and learning how to code from MIT

Washington Post: They’re locked up in D.C. — and learning how to code from MIT. “The last time Rochell Crowder held an office job, he said, it was 1983 and computers were not yet central to everyday life. But on Thursday, after almost four decades of odd jobs and crimes that landed him in and out of jail, the 57-year-old completed a computer science course taught by PhD candidates from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.”

Brown University: To advance research on incarceration, Brown acquires personal papers of prisoner Mumia Abu-Jamal

Brown University: To advance research on incarceration, Brown acquires personal papers of prisoner Mumia Abu-Jamal. “The prison records, correspondence and artwork of Abu-Jamal, and related materials from advocate Johanna Fernández, will anchor a collection at the John Hay Library focused on first-person accounts of incarceration.”

Berkeley News: Overcrowding, old buildings fueled COVID in California prisons, says new report

Berkeley News: Overcrowding, old buildings fueled COVID in California prisons, says new report. “Overcrowding, sometimes in antiquated buildings, compounded by rapidly changing conditions and the need for complex coordination, helped to drive a dramatic surge in COVID-19 in California’s prisons, according to a new report from the University of California, San Francisco, and the University of California, Berkeley.”

Johns Hopkins University: American Prison Writing Archive Moves To Johns Hopkins

Johns Hopkins University: American Prison Writing Archive Moves To Johns Hopkins. “With the move, principal investigator Vesla Weaver, Bloomberg Distinguished Professor of political science and sociology at the Johns Hopkins Krieger School of Arts and Sciences, and Doran Larson, the archive’s founder and Edward North Professor of Literature at Hamilton College, plan for the new collective to aggregate 10,000 pieces of first-person witness, making it the largest digital archive of writings by incarcerated people in the world.”

JSTOR Daily: The Angolite Comes to the Reveal Digital American Prison Newspapers Collection

JSTOR Daily: The Angolite Comes to the Reveal Digital American Prison Newspapers Collection. “The Angolite is one of the most famous prison newspapers in history, having won multiple awards and changed the popular conception of what prison journalism could be. The paper is produced by the people incarcerated at the Louisiana State Penitentiary, colloquially known as Angola for the slave plantation that preceded it…. At present, the sprawling prison farm is 28 square miles, 18,000 acres. It is the largest maximum-security prison in the United States, and the state of Louisiana has the highest incarceration rate in the nation.”

Gizmodo: Job Ad for Bureau of Prisons Touts Amazing Number of Mental Illnesses in U.S. Prison System

Gizmodo: Job Ad for Bureau of Prisons Touts Amazing Number of Mental Illnesses in U.S. Prison System. “The U.S. Bureau of Prisons purchased a number of Facebook ads recently in an attempt to hire new people in a variety of roles throughout the country. But one ad in particular is catching attention on social media for how bleak it seems. The Bureau of Prisons seems to be using the number of mental illnesses in the U.S. prison system as a career opportunity for any psychologists who happen to be job hunting right now.”

Korea Future: Launching the North Korean Prison Database

Korea Future: Launching the North Korean Prison Database. “Today we launch the North Korean Prison Database — a growing and comprehensive archive of international human rights law violations and atrocities that have transpired in the North Korean Penal system. The database preserves and manages evidence gathered through detailed investigations by Korea Future. To date, we have identified 597 perpetrators linked to 5,181 human rights violations committed against 784 detainees in 148 penal facilities.”

Business Insider: Federal prison working conditions are getting worse despite Biden’s promise to improve conditions, staffers say

Business Insider: Federal prison working conditions are getting worse despite Biden’s promise to improve conditions, staffers say. “President Joe Biden pledged to overhaul the criminal justice system and improve conditions within federal prisons. But more than a year since he took office, some federal prison workers tell Insider their working conditions at federal prison facilities have worsened as the COVID-19 pandemic persists.”

San Diego Union-Tribune: Judge declines to order sheriff to improve COVID-19 protections in San Diego County jails

San Diego Union-Tribune: Judge declines to order sheriff to improve COVID-19 protections in San Diego County jails. “Judge Joel R. Wohlfeil has upheld his tentative ruling from last week and rejected a plea to issue an injunction that would have forced the San Diego Sheriff’s Department to do more to protect people in county jail from COVID-19. A trio of civil rights law firms sought the order earlier this year, saying too many men and women in San Diego County jails were exposed to the virus due to lax protocols by sheriff’s deputies.”