The Hindu: Botanical Survey of India’s collection of rare paintings, dyes, fabrics and type specimens to go public

The Hindu: Botanical Survey of India’s collection of rare paintings, dyes, fabrics and type specimens to go public. “Apart from botanical paintings, the digital archive also displays rare natural dyes, fabrics and type specimens (the first collection that’s used for describing a plant). Each one of these rare holdings has its own story. Thomas Wardle, a Scottish businessman, whose business in silk dyes wasn’t doing well, visited the industrial section of the Indian Museum and, in one year, came up with about 3,500 samples of dye patterns extracted from 64 Indian plants. The 15 volumes of Wardle’s Specimen of Fabrics Dyed with Indian Dyes, published in 1886 and preserved with the BSI, has also been digitised.”

Central European University: Digital Archive of Cultural Heritage a New Addition to Blinken OSA Catalog

Central European University: Digital Archive of Cultural Heritage a New Addition to Blinken OSA Catalog. “In 2019, the Vera and Donald Blinken Open Society Archives (Blinken OSA) and the Department of Medieval Studies at Central European University, which runs the Cultural Heritage Studies Program, initiated a collaboration facilitating the research work conducted by students and faculty of the Cultural Heritage Studies Program to be preserved and made available to researchers at Blinken OSA. The new archival fonds are the result of this cooperation, and to date, three research collections of intangible cultural heritage have been processed.”

The Hindu: India has the world’s lowest survival rate of cinema. And this heritage needs attention

The Hindu: India has the world’s lowest survival rate of cinema. And this heritage needs attention. “In his book, The Death of Cinema, Paolo Cherchi-Usai refers to an article published in 1897 in which the life of a cinematograph frame is arithmetically worked out as ‘one-and-one-third seconds’. So, Usai says, it is the most ephemeral of things, whose life is even shorter than that of a firework, and he wonders whether film eventually exists only in the minds of its viewers. If so, physical preservation of film becomes secondary. Indian culture, with its penchant for concepts like maya and transience, seems to follow a similar attitude to cinema.”

AP: Georgia Teens Start Program to Teach Telugu, Tamil Languages

AP: Georgia Teens Start Program to Teach Telugu, Tamil Languages. “From a young age, South Forsyth High School students Suhaas Bonkur, Krithika Kasireddy, Ritika Vemulapalli and Vinay Polaku began learning Telugu and Tamil, which are south Indian languages. When the four friends began hanging out, their speaking and comprehension skills strengthened, as well as their bonds with each other. In March, Bonkur began to develop an idea for a free tutoring service that would offer students of any age the opportunity to learn Telugu and Tamil. It wasn’t until his three friends jumped on board that the program started to take off.”

Rest of World: Forget emoji, the real Unicode drama is over an endangered Indian script

Rest of World: Forget emoji, the real Unicode drama is over an endangered Indian script. “The effort to digitize the Tulu script is a small slice of a much larger worldwide problem. Like many languages around the world, Tulu might soon disappear: UNESCO identifies it as one of 192 languages from India that are ‘in danger.’ Globally, 40% of the over 7,000 languages spoken by humanity are at risk. In the last century, hundreds have gone extinct, taking with them stories, cultural traditions, ethnic identities, and a bounty of other information from the past. One way to preserve a language is to ensure it’s digitized, so that its speakers can continue expressing themselves as technology evolves.”

Independence Day 2021: India gets official website for celebrations, features 360-degree VR (Hindustan Times)

Hindustan Times: Independence Day 2021: India gets official website for celebrations, features 360-degree VR. “The Independence Day celebration platform also provides a host of other features, including a special IDC radio, gallery, interactive filters, e-books on deeds of gallantry, 50 years of 1971 victory, and blogs on the freedom movement, wars and war memorials.”

South China Morning Post: As Australia returns Indian antiques worth US$2.2 million, many others remain smuggled worldwide

South China Morning Post: As Australia returns Indian antiques worth US$2.2 million, many others remain smuggled worldwide . “India is set to welcome back 14 antiques worth US$2.2 million from Australia’s national art museum, in the fourth such repatriation of artworks allegedly stolen by a man described as ‘one of the most prolific commodities smugglers in the world’. The National Gallery of Australia acquired dozens of pieces between 1989 to 2009 from the New York gallery of Subhash Kapoor, who is currently on trial in India on several cases of fraud and antique pilferage.”

The Hindu: National Film Archive of India acquires 450 glass slides of early Telugu cinema

The Hindu: National Film Archive of India acquires 450 glass slides of early Telugu cinema. “In a major acquisition, the National Film Archive of India (NFAI) has added more than 450 glass slides that represent the pictorial history of early Telugu cinema from the late 1930s to the mid-1950s, to its collection. All of them are in black and white covering 70 Telugu films, according to an official release.”

Indian Express: Enthusiasts encourage history and heritage through social media

Indian Express: Enthusiasts encourage history and heritage through social media. “Every evening, without fail, literature, history and heritage enthusiasts get together on Clubhouse. The rooms, started by The Karwaan Club, are an initiative of Karwaan: The Heritage Exploration, a student-led history initiative. The club has more than 400 members, 1500 followers and welcomes anyone even slightly interested in exploring the past. Karwaan is not the first one, or the only one, to use social media to create a space where history can thrive.”

New Indian Express: Weavers hitch wagon to social media

New Indian Express: Weavers hitch wagon to social media. “Weavers who do not have websites, have joined hands with online stores and microblogging sites to get orders. The uploaded videos and content on these sites also put their names on the organic Google rankings page, which will fetch them customers. It seems their ventures have yielded results, and they are earning handsome returns. They are expecting good orders to roll in once the festival season starts.”

NDTV: National Library To Upload Books On Indian Culture On Web

NDTV Education: National Library To Upload Books On Indian Culture On Web. “As part of its outreach drive for young generation readers, the National Library plans to upload on the web a select part of its voluminous collection, including books on Indian culture, a top official said Tuesday. Of the 20 lakh odd books in its possession, 5,000 titles under the Indian Culture section will be uploaded on the web in the coming months, the new officiating director general told reporters here.”

Muslim Mirror: An Indo-American’s pursuit for vanishing Islamic heritage sites

Muslim Mirror: An Indo-American’s pursuit for vanishing Islamic heritage sites. “Chennai: Mr. Siraj Thakor, from Toronto, Canada, has undertaken the monumental task of creating an online database of all the Islamic Heritage Sites of India. He likes to preserve it digitally and make it available to all to cherish the Islamic past of this great country. Mr. Siraj is looking for volunteers to assist him with the information on Islamic Heritage Sites in India.”

India Express: Government must be transparent about its plans for the National Archives of India

India Express: Government must be transparent about its plans for the National Archives of India. “The absence of public consultations and the aggressive pursuit of the Central Vista project during a national crisis raises important questions not just about the future of historical research, but about the state’s responsibilities towards its citizens. The curtailment of access to public spaces as part of the project also bears on the proposed changes to the National Archives Complex and the students, workers, bureaucrats, tour guides, local and international researchers who work in and around the complex.”