New Indian Express: ASI faces uphill task of cataloguing and preserving piles of its archival treasure

New Indian Express: ASI faces uphill task of cataloguing and preserving piles of its archival treasure . “The Archaeological Survey of India (ASI) has started an uphill task to catalogue and preserve piles of archival records lying in disarray in its offices across states. Historical documents are being searched through and evaluated to fast-track the setting up of the Archive Division at ASI headquarters in Delhi.”

Times of India: E-archive To Collate Data On Ancient, Colonial Indian Laws For Easy Access And Awareness

Times of India: E-archive To Collate Data On Ancient, Colonial Indian Laws For Easy Access And Awareness. “To make sources of legal history easily available to scholars, lawyers and judges, and to raise awareness among present and future generations about ancient and medieval Indian laws, the Centre for Studies In Legal History of the West Bengal National University of Juridical Sciences (WBNUJS), Kolkata, will establish an electronic archive on legal history comprising ancient, medieval and colonial Indian laws up to 1947 that are still being used in the country.”

‘I wish to be made free and to remain in this country’: Testimony of liberated enslaved women, girls and boys (British Library)

British Library: ‘I wish to be made free and to remain in this country’: Testimony of liberated enslaved women, girls and boys. “On 19 November 1847, Gregor Grant, Senior Magistrate of Police at Bombay (Mumbai), sent depositions of forty-seven women and girls and twelve boys to the Government of Bombay. These individuals had been on board five baghlahs (sailing vessels) captured in the Persian Gulf in September 1847 by the East India Company’s Indian Navy and brought into Bombay Harbour…. The correspondence concerning the five baghlahs and the people on board can be found in the India Office Records file IOR/L/PS/5/452, which has been digitised and can be accessed through the Qatar Digital Library.”

Trinidad & Tobago Guardian: Foundation launched to preserve legacies of Indian indentureship

Trinidad & Tobago Guardian: Foundation launched to preserve legacies of Indian indentureship. “The Girmitya Foundation, which is a non-governmental organisation registered in T&T, was officially launched last week Sunday at The Mahatma Gandhi Institute for Cultural Cooperation. Founder Nutan Ragoobir stated that Indian immigrants were made to sign a Girmit (agreement) as part of their bonding to hard labour and as such were called Girmityas. Ragoobir stated that the foundation was able to successfully achieve its first goal of creating and implementing a digital library dedicated to Indian history—Girmitya Archives.” If “Girmitya” sounds a little familiar, it’s because on May 15th I indexed an article about Girmityas arriving in Fiji.

Fiji Village: Database launched to view boarding passes of Girmitiyas

Fiji Village: Database launched to view boarding passes of Girmitiyas. “Descendants of Girmitiyas can now go online to look at the boarding passes of their ancestors who came to Fiji… Developer, Akhilesh Shiuram says they wanted to create a database that has records of passes of more than 60,000 Girmityas that came to Fiji in the 37 years of the indentured labour system.” Girmityas were indentured laborers who came to Fiji (and other places) from British India. You can learn more about them at https://harvardlawreview.org/2021/03/the-agreement-and-the-girmitiya/ . (There’s a Web site devoted to Girmityas and their history but it is inaccessible at this writing.)

Spotted in Mentions all Over the Web: Festivals from India

Spotted via lots of mentions that I could not resolve into an article link: Festivals from India. From the About page: “Festivals From India is an India-UK initiative made possible by the British Council. The digital platform is designed to showcase hundreds of arts and culture festivals across artforms, locations and languages. Whether you love attending festivals, are a festival manager, supplier, sponsor, advertiser, volunteer or just a curious cultural carnivore, Festivals from India is here to help.”

The Hindu: Rare digital archive of Kerala-related material in doldrums

The Hindu: Rare digital archive of Kerala-related material in doldrums. “Not many would know that Kerala in the 1940s had a literary magazine named after Rabindranath Tagore. Nor would they know about the content of the school textbooks then. Grandhapura, one of the biggest free digital archives in Malayalam, which holds a rare collection of more than 2000 Kerala-related documents, including periodicals and school textbooks from the 1800s, has been making this possible over the past decade, with its ever-expanding archive of rare materials. But, now Grandhapura is facing an uncertain future as archiving scholar Shiju Alex, who founded it and has been maintaining it for 12 years, has decided to discontinue the efforts due to paucity of resources and time, and the failure to scale up.”

New York Times: India’s Art History United in a Single Source

This is from last month but the resource is launching this week. New York Times: India’s Art History United in a Single Source. “The history of art in India, going back 10,000 years to the Bhimbetka cave drawings, has long been told through a Western lens or written by Indian scholars in a dense, academic style that felt inaccessible to many. But that will soon change, when the MAP Academy Encyclopedia of Indian Art arrives online on April 21. With over 2,000 initial entries, peer-reviewed by some of the world’s leading art historians and experts on South Asia, it is a project whose scope has not been tried before.”

Outlook Traveller: The Lost Heer Project is an Instagram collective that aims to understand Punjab’s colonial history through the eyes of its women

Outlook Traveller: The Lost Heer Project is an Instagram collective that aims to understand Punjab’s colonial history through the eyes of its women . “In 2014, Harleen Singh, a Delhi-born Toronto-based engineer, spent four months in India interviewing witnesses of the 1947 partition. Over the next three years of collection of these testimonies, Singh, who belongs to a family of Partition refugees, realised the lack of female perspective in our mainstream narratives. This was the starting point for The Lost Heer Project (TLHP), an Instagram collective that aims to understand Punjab’s history through the eyes of women.”

BBC: The amateur historians chronicling Delhi’s past on Instagram

BBC: The amateur historians chronicling Delhi’s past on Instagram. “Mr [Umair] Shah, now 27, lives in Delhi where he works in digital marketing for fashion brands. But he’s also Sikkawala, or coin collector – that’s his moniker on Instagram where he documents fragments of history. To take to Instagram isn’t to reduce history to a mere snapshot. Mr Shah’s lyrical captions are steeped in facts and read like excerpts from an exciting story – where we learn about dead emperors, malevolent djinns and of rebellions that dissolved empires – in about 300 words.”

India Today: Will innovative database on ‘Indian Land Laws’ make a tangible mark among citizens? Dr. Jagdish Chandra Rout explains

India Today: Will innovative database on ‘Indian Land Laws’ make a tangible mark among citizens? Dr. Jagdish Chandra Rout explains. “Since India is an agrarian economy with over 60% of its populace dependent on cultivable land for livelihood and sustenance, the Centre for Policy Research (CPR) has reportedly pioneered the launch of a database… on Indian Land Laws (claimed to be the first of its kind). It keeps in view the pivotal role played by land as a prime economic resource.” I poked around the site for a few minutes. You have to have an account to see legislation details but it’s easy to sign up. I was VERY impressed with the design and UI of this site. Great job.