From Old Letters Preserved In Godrej Cabinets To One-Of-A-Kind Scientific Equipment, A Peek Inside NCBS Bengaluru’s Upcoming Scientific Archive (Huffpost)

Huffpost: From Old Letters Preserved In Godrej Cabinets To One-Of-A-Kind Scientific Equipment, A Peek Inside NCBS Bengaluru’s Upcoming Scientific Archive. “Walking into what looked like a disused laboratory at the National Centre for Biological Sciences (NCBS) in Bengaluru, Venkat Srinivasan looked back with an apologetic smile. ‘This is just temporary, while we prepare the space downstairs,’ he said. The room still had some equipment, but that was not what we were here to see.”

G91JA: WhatsApp fights fake news in India using actors who role-play in public

G9IJA: WhatsApp fights fake news in India using actors who role-play in public. “On a hot morning in India’s tourist mecca of Jaipur, an open truck painted in the signature lime-green colors of Facebook’s WhatsApp messaging service pulls into a dusty lane, where five men spill out and begin to perform a skit. The event is part of a major grassroots effort by WhatsApp to battle fake news, which has triggered numerous lynchings in a country where 200 million people use the service, more than anywhere else in the world.”

Quartz: Indian politicians are now flocking to an unlikely “no English” social network

Quartz: Indian politicians are now flocking to an unlikely “no English” social network. “India’s online political battles are increasingly being fought in its many native languages—not English. As the country prepares for the 2019 general election, a number of key politicians and political parties are getting on ShareChat, a fast-growing, indigenous social network that caters to new internet users in small-town India.”

Digital Journalism: Digital Archiving as Social Protest

Digital Journalism: Digital Archiving as Social Protest. “The relationship between journalism and social marginalization is a relatively understudied area in digital journalism studies. Our case study of Dalit Camera (DC), an online news archive and chronicle based in India, examines how historically disadvantaged Dalits, or ‘Untouchables,’ are leveraging digital tools to narrate their oppressive past to the outside world parallel to the rise of political censorship in India. As part of its archiving process, DC is preserving footage of Dalit resistance against hegemonic domination by caste Hindus. Through their grassroots network of citizen journalists, DC is also engaged in reporting caste-based discrimination and violence today, contributing to the Dalit social movement for equality and justice. Our study provides the first examination of Dalit social protest as a function of digital news archiving, in the process bringing a non-Western subject typically reserved for Subaltern Studies to digital journalism studies as a potent example of citizen journalism and participatory online culture in a censorious media climate. “

Outlook India: Election Commission To Get Help From Facebook, Twitter, Google To Check Fake News During Polls

Outlook India: Election Commission To Get Help From Facebook, Twitter, Google To Check Fake News During Polls. “Chief Election Commissioner O P Rawat has said that major internet players like Google and social media giants like Twitte [sic] and Facebook have assured the Election Commission (EC) that they will not allow their platforms to be used for anything which effects the purity of polls during campaign period.”

Quartz: Indians are now travelling for Instagram

Quartz: Indians are now travelling for Instagram . “‘Do it for the gram’ seems to be the new motto all around. People are undertaking do-it-yourself projects, restaurants are designing aesthetically-pleasing dishes and designers are creating spaces with Instagram-worthy backdrops. And travel is no different. The once budget-conscious Indian traveller now has an equally—or perhaps more—important box to tick when choosing accommodation: it must look good on Instagram, Facebook, and other such platforms.”

Gizmodo Australia: Supreme Court Restricts India’s Colossal Biometric Database

Gizmodo Australia: Supreme Court Restricts India’s Colossal Biometric Database. “India’s Supreme Court ruled on Wednesday that the country’s sweeping biometric database does not violate privacy rights. But the panel of five judges did decide to place restrictions on the program, according to The Times of India. Under the Aadhaar system, all citizens, residents and visiting workers of India — an estimated 1.2 billion people — are virtually required to provide iris scans and fingerprints to the government so they can receive a unique 12-digit identity code.”