Toronto Star: Certain ‘Indian’ day school records off-limits to public while province conducts investigation

Toronto Star: Certain ‘Indian’ day school records off-limits to public while province conducts investigation. “After committing to investigate the history of New Brunswick’s infamous day schools for Indigenous children, the New Brunswick government is now calling on the province’s museum, archives and ‘other institutions’ to make records of the schools available to First Nations communities.” The headline is confusing. What I get from the article is that records are temporarily unavailable while they are being digitized for broader access.

Wall Street Journal: At Schools Where Native American Children Died, New Hope for Answers

Wall Street Journal: At Schools Where Native American Children Died, New Hope for Answers. “Sifting through archived records, the volunteer group has compiled 67 names, but with little funding for more research, they have no way of knowing how many of the children are buried in Chilocco’s cemetery, which bears only a single marked grave. Theirs is one of numerous efforts by tribal historians and researchers over the past several years to uncover evidence of Native Americans who died at the boarding schools. Until now, these grass roots investigations have been stymied by limited resources and logistical hurdles. Now, those leading the projects are hoping a new federal investigation can shed light on a mystery that has haunted Indian Country for generations.”

TimesColonist: First Nations win access to archives of Sisters of St. Ann

TimesColonist: First Nations win access to archives of Sisters of St. Ann. “First Nations have won access to the private archives of the Sisters of St. Ann, an order of Catholic nuns that ran four residential schools, including the Kamloops Indian Residential School. The Royal B.C. Museum said Wednesday it had signed a memorandum of agreement with the Sisters of St. Ann to provide access to the order’s archives to the museum and to the Indian Residential School History and Dialogue Centre at UBC.”

Department of the Interior: Secretary Haaland Announces Federal Indian Boarding School Initiative

Department of the Interior: Secretary Haaland Announces Federal Indian Boarding School Initiative. “The Federal Indian Boarding School Initiative will serve as an investigation about the loss of human life and the lasting consequences of residential Indian boarding schools. The primary goal will be to identify boarding school facilities and sites; the location of known and possible student burial sites located at or near school facilities; and the identities and Tribal affiliations of children interred at such locations.”

Ricochet: Catholic Church residential school records belong to survivors and their families

Ricochet: Catholic Church residential school records belong to survivors and their families. “Beyond base self-preservation, we can imagine Church administrators assure themselves behind closed doors that the decision to keep the records private is morally defensible. Thorny issues of privacy and confidentiality, and the terrifying (if unsubstantiated) prospect of mob justice enacted upon named perpetrators, may foster a paternalistic desire to keep documents hidden. Better to keep the door locked than to expose survivors and staff alike to an onslaught of public scrutiny. But this is not a morally defensible position. These records belong to the people about whom they were written: residential school survivors and their families.”

University of Manitoba: NCTR launches a new website and archive database – nctr. ca

University of Manitoba: NCTR launches a new website and archive database – nctr. ca. “The new and improved National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation (NCTR) website and archive database is now live. Some of the NCTR’s most important work is sharing the truth of residential schools and providing Survivors and their families access to their school records. The new, easy-to-navigate website and database ensures we help connect Survivors, Educators, Researchers and those interested in the history of residential schools a comprehensive group of resources. The NCTR holds millions of records, many of which are public records, statements and events available to be explored and understood.”

Toronto Star: Digital archive to help National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation access Residential School Survivor stories

Toronto Star: Digital archive to help National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation access Residential School Survivor stories. “The National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation (NCTR) received $2,411,773 to restructure and decolonize its digital archival records to promote innovative research meaningful to Indigenous communities. Funding was provided through the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) grant which will enable archivists to build a digital architecture for their archives, allowing for better access to the stories of Residential School Survivors.”

NET Nebraska: Digital Archive Catalogues Abuses Of Genoa Indian School

NET Nebraska: Digital Archive Catalogues Abuses Of Genoa Indian School. “From its opening in 1884 until its decommissioning in 1934, the Genoa Indian School in Genoa, Nebraska harbored Native American children with the goal of destroying native culture through assimilation. Now, there’s a digital project that seeks to document the experiences of those who attended for future generations.”

SooToday: Digitized letters explore life at residential school

SooToday: Digitized letters explore life at residential school. “The Shingwauk Residential Schools Centre (SRSC) is preserving documentation of daily life in the Shingwauk and Wawanosh residential schools through its Healing and Education Through Digital Access project. A total of 10 letter books spanning a period from 1876 to 1904 were digitized, which include letters from residential school principals Edward F. Wilson and George L. King, which were intended for government officials, church representatives and students, among others.”

Cision: Canada’s Residential School Story Launches on Google Earth Voyager (PRESS RELEASE)

Cision: Canada’s Residential School Story Launches on Google Earth Voyager (PRESS RELEASE). “Residential schools for First Nations, Métis and Inuit children were first established in 1831 and ran for 165 years until 1996. This system had one goal: to forcibly assimilate Canada’s Indigenous Peoples into the non-Indigenous population. Canadian Geographic Education (Can Geo Education), the first Canadian organization to produce Google Earth Voyager content, has worked closely with the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation (NCTR) of the University of Manitoba to create an educational tool that will help students learn about this dark chapter in Canadian history.”