University of Maine: New exhibit featuring 3D-printed replica of 19th-century helmet opens at Hudson Museum

University of Maine: New exhibit featuring 3D-printed replica of 19th-century helmet opens at Hudson Museum. “The original Tlingit Frog Clan Helmet, carved out of yellow cedar, painted in green and red pigments and inlaid with abalone shell discs that were previously attached to a textile, sits alongside its identical replica. The 3D printed model was created by engineers from UMaine’s Advanced Structures and Composites Center and graduate students from the Intermedia Programs. Both helmets are surrounded by photos depicting the stages in the process to create the replica and panels describing how the original helmet came to the museum, what sparked the efforts to recreate it, who worked on the project and their roles.”

KYUK: KYUK to receive $350,000 grant to digitally preserve and catalog decades of archival material

KYUK: KYUK to receive $350,000 grant to digitally preserve and catalog decades of archival material. “The KYUK station, our humble building in the center of town, is responsible for the largest collection of video and audio footage documenting the Yukon-Kuskokwim (Y-K) Delta. For decades, that collection was entirely physical: old tapes and VHS lining rows of shelves in the back of the building. Now, thanks to a $350,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, KYUK is bringing that archive into the 21st century and protecting it for future generations.”

Washington Post: Residential schools banned native languages. The Cree want theirs back.

Washington Post: Residential schools banned native languages. The Cree want theirs back.. “Across Canada, the often brutal residential school system, designed to assimilate Indigenous people into White, European culture, succeeded in breaking the tradition of passing on languages from generation to generation — and put the survival of some in jeopardy. But now, 25 years after the last residential school was shuttered, some Indigenous communities — including the one here that Pope Francis visited Monday — are reviving and relearning their native languages.” Please be advised that the first few paragraphs in this story have references to sexual abuse.

Tech Xplore: Aboriginal language could help solve complex AI problems

Tech Xplore: Aboriginal language could help solve complex AI problems. “An Aboriginal language could hold the key to solving some of the most challenging communication problems between humans and artificial intelligence (AI) systems. A new paper, published by Frontiers in Physics and led by UNSW Canberra’s Professor Hussein Abbass, explains how Jingulu—a language spoken by the Jingili people in the Northern Territory—has characteristics that allow it to be easily translated into AI commands.”

University of Melbourne: Bringing A Living Archive To Life

University of Melbourne: Bringing A Living Archive To Life . “Working with Indigenous partners and students in Australia and the US, we are engaging in creative practices, including storytelling through possum-skin cloak-making, intercultural collaborations and supporting the research through teaching and learning. These steps aim to enliven archived collections by making and doing, finding new ways to support Indigenous knowledges and stories.”

Local Journalism Initiative: Knowledge Basket shares database of Indigenous information to care for lands and water

Local Journalism Initiative: Knowledge Basket shares database of Indigenous information to care for lands and water. “The Conservation through Reconciliation Partnership has officially launched a new initiative titled the IPCA Knowledge Basket. It will provide resources through a database to communities and officials involved with Indigenous Protected and Conserved Areas (IPCA). These are lands and waters where Indigenous governments have the primary role in protecting and conserving ecosystems.”

Toronto Metropolitan University: Choose your own adventure game takes users into the lives of Indigenous youth

Toronto Metropolitan University: Choose your own adventure game takes users into the lives of Indigenous youth. “Developed by a team of Indigenous staff and students, In Their Moccasins is a digital tool designed for non-Indigenous faculty, administrative staff, and students at post-secondary institutions to learn about the lived experiences of Indigenous students.”

Canada NewsWire: New Government of Canada legislation to give Indigenous peoples a stronger voice and strengthen the protection and conservation of historic places in Canada (PRESS RELEASE)

Canada NewsWire: New Government of Canada legislation to give Indigenous peoples a stronger voice and strengthen the protection and conservation of historic places in Canada (PRESS RELEASE). “The proposed legislation creates three new positions on the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada (HSMBC) for First Nations, Métis and Inuit representatives, and improves integration of Indigenous history, heritage values, and memory practices into Canada’s national heritage and history.”

University of Wisconsin-Madison: 3D scan will reveal the stories hidden within 1,200-year-old Wisconsin canoe

University of Wisconsin-Madison: 3D scan will reveal the stories hidden within 1,200-year-old Wisconsin canoe. “[Lennon] Rodgers — who directs the Grainger Engineering Design and Innovation Laboratory at the University of Wisconsin–Madison — was there to help archaeologists better understand a 1,200-year-old, 15-foot dugout canoe recovered in 2021 from the waters of Lake Mendota, the largest of Madison’s four lakes and part of the ancestral home of the Ho-Chunk Nation. At the invitation of Wisconsin State Archaeologist James Skibo and Scott Roller, senior collections manager for the Wisconsin Historical Society, Rodgers scanned the canoe and created detailed 3D renderings that will preserve the boat’s legacy and allow researchers to study the craft while it undergoes a multiyear preservation process.”

University of Wisconin-Madison: Researchers aim X-rays at century-old plant secretions for insight into Aboriginal Australian cultural heritage

University of Wisconsin-Madison: Researchers aim X-rays at century-old plant secretions for insight into Aboriginal Australian cultural heritage. “…knowing the chemical composition of pigments and binders that Aboriginal Australian artists employ could allow archaeological scientists and art conservators to identify these materials in important cultural heritage objects. Now, researchers are turning to X-ray science to help reveal the composition of the materials used in Aboriginal Australian cultural heritage – starting with the analysis of century-old samples of plant secretions, or exudates.”

Raven Radio: Southeast Native Radio aired for just 16 years, but its voices will live on in a new digital archive

Raven Radio: Southeast Native Radio aired for just 16 years, but its voices will live on in a new digital archive . “Southeast Native Radio was broadcast over KTOO in Juneau for 16 years, from 1985 to 2001. The volunteer-produced show played as current affairs at the time, but twenty-one years later it’s become a window into the lives of the people and events that shaped Native culture in the region over the last century.”

The First News: Extraordinary life of Józef Piłsudski’s older brother told in new website

The First News: Extraordinary life of Józef Piłsudski’s older brother told in new website. “The extraordinary life of Józef Piłsudski’s older brother Bronisław is showcased in the first website dedicated to the man many regarded as a real king…. After being exiled to Sakhalin Island in the far east of the Russian Empire, Bronisław soon learned the language of one of the most mysterious peoples in the world, the Ainu, and set about documenting the life and culture of the island’s people.”

CBC: N.W.T. museum digitizes hundreds of fine art pieces in new online collection

CBC: N.W.T. museum digitizes hundreds of fine art pieces in new online collection. “The Northwest Territories’ Prince of Wales Heritage Centre is making hundreds of its fine art items searchable online, something museum curatorial assistant Ryan Silke says will bring one of the biggest collections of northern sculptures, paintings, prints and textiles to users without leaving their home.”