Smithsonian: Native Cinema Showcase Returns as a Virtual Program With Messages of Strength and Resilience

Smithsonian: Native Cinema Showcase Returns as a Virtual Program With Messages of Strength and Resilience. “The Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian brings its annual Native Cinema Showcase to online audiences Nov. 12–18. This year’s showcase focuses on Native people boldly asserting themselves through language, healing, building community and a continued relationship with the land. Activism lies at the heart of all these stories. The showcase provides a unique forum for engagement with Native filmmakers from Indigenous communities throughout the Western Hemisphere and Arctic.”

New York Times: Marie Wilcox, Who Saved Her Native Language From Extinction, Dies at 87

New York Times: Marie Wilcox, Who Saved Her Native Language From Extinction, Dies at 87. “For many years, Marie Wilcox was the guardian of the Wukchumni language, one of several Indigenous languages that were once common in Central California but have either disappeared or nearly disappeared. She was the only person for a time who could speak it fluently. She started writing down words in Wukchumni as she remembered them in the late 1990s, scrawling on the backs of envelopes and slips of paper. Then she started typing them into an old boxy computer. Soon she was getting up early to devote her day to gathering words and working into the night.”

UCLA: UCLA Library funds 29 international cultural preservation projects

UCLA: UCLA Library funds 29 international cultural preservation projects. “The Modern Endangered Archives Program, a granting initiative launched in 2018 by the UCLA Library with support from Arcadia, a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin, has funded 29 new projects that will preserve at-risk materials as diverse as audio recordings of indigenous languages in Siberia, film periodicals from Pakistan and India, and photographs and maps from Peruvian Amazonia.”

News@Northeastern: The Race To Save Indigenous Languages, Using Automatic Speech Recognition

News@Northeastern: The Race To Save Indigenous Languages, Using Automatic Speech Recognition. “Growing up in the windy plains near the Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation, [Michael] Running Wolf says that although his family—which is part Cheyenne, part Lakota—didn’t have daily access to running water or electricity, sometimes, when the winds died down, the power would flicker on, and he’d plug in his Atari console and play games with his sisters. These early experiences would spur forward a lifelong interest in computers, artificial intelligence, and software engineering that Running Wolf is now harnessing to help reawaken endangered indigenous languages in North and South America, some of which are so critically at risk of extinction that their tallies of living native speakers have dwindled into the single digits.”

263 Chat: Zimbabwe International Film Festival Returns

263 Chat: Zimbabwe International Film Festival Returns. “‘Narratives from Zimbabwe’ is a project initiated by ZIFFT in 2019, that has so far travelled around many parts of the country, documenting Zimbabwe’s rich history and heritage. The interviews, footage and photographs captured during this first phase of the project will be used to create a multi-media digital archive and interactive website that filmmakers and other creative content producers will be able to draw from as a reservoir of indigenous knowledge and inspiration.”

University of Cape Town News: Year-old San and Khoi Centre adds invaluable indigenous knowledge to archive

University of Cape Town News: Year-old San and Khoi Centre adds invaluable indigenous knowledge to archive. “When the University of Cape Town’s (UCT) African Studies library was destroyed by fire in April this year, so too were many resources on the cultures and languages of Southern Africa’s indigenous people. But new knowledge produced by the university’s youngest research entity, the San and Khoi Centre, is set to revive this archive. The San and Khoi Centre in the Centre for African Studies (CAS) calls this ‘unburning the fire’.”

New York University: NYU, University of Waikato Receive Mellon Foundation Grant to Protect Indigenous Knowledge and Data

New York University: NYU, University of Waikato Receive Mellon Foundation Grant to Protect Indigenous Knowledge and Data. “Equity for Indigenous Research and Innovation Coordinating Hub (ENRICH), launched in 2019, aims to establish and solidify Indigenous cultural authority within digital infrastructures and to increase Indigenous rights within historical records and future research…. Under the Mellon grant, ENRICH will expand its training and resources developed by and for Indigenous communities in order to bolster efforts in the United States, New Zealand, Canada, and Australia to properly connect Indigenous cultural material and data to present-day communities and to establish cultural authority as well as intellectual property legal protections over them.”

Washington Post: Taking Indigenous culture viral

Washington Post: Taking Indigenous culture viral. “In the middle of the Amazon forest, along the banks of the Rio Negro, a young woman in face paint was bored. The coronavirus pandemic had cut off the flow of visitors, further isolating this Indigenous village, accessible only by boat. So Cunhaporanga Tatuyo, 22, was passing her days, phone in hand, trying to learn the ways of TikTok. She danced to songs, dubbed videos, wildly distorted her appearance — the full TikTok experience. None of it found much of an audience. Then she held up a wriggly, thick beetle larva to the camera.”

Smithsonian: Smithsonian To Host the Virtual Symposium “The Other Slavery” Sept. 24–27

Smithsonian: Smithsonian To Host the Virtual Symposium “The Other Slavery” Sept. 24–27. “Stories of enslaved Indigenous peoples have often been absent from the historical narrative. From Sept. 24–27, the Smithsonian will host the virtual symposium ‘The Other Slavery: Histories of Indian Bondage from New Spain to the Southwestern United States,’ which will explore the hidden stories of enslaved Indigenous peoples, focusing on the legacy of Spanish colonization in the Americas and Asia and its impact on what is now the southwestern United States. This program seeks to give a comprehensive first voice to these hushed stories and living legacies.”

Associated Press: Missouri cave with ancient Native American drawings sold

Associated Press: Missouri cave with ancient Native American drawings sold. “Bryan Laughlin, director of Selkirk Auctioneers & Appraisers, the St. Louis-based firm handling the auction, said the winning bidder declined to be named. A St. Louis family that’s owned the land since 1953 has mainly used it for hunting. The cave was the site of sacred rituals and burying of the dead. It also has more than 290 prehistoric glyphs, or hieroglyphic symbols used to represent sounds or meanings, ‘making it the largest collection of indigenous people’s polychrome paintings in Missouri,’ according to the auction website.”

Green Bay Press-Gazette: Ron Corn Jr. is one of fewer than 20 fluent speakers of the Menominee language. He’s working to change that.

Green Bay Press-Gazette: Ron Corn Jr. is one of fewer than 20 fluent speakers of the Menominee language. He’s working to change that.. “The Menominee Nation offers language instruction through its education system, including an immersion program in which small children are fully immersed in the language. But grassroots programs, such as Menomini yoU, allow for tribal citizens, or anyone else not attending Menominee schools, to learn from home any time.Their website… informs users that they can learn at their own pace, whether 10 minutes or four hours a day and whether it’s in the morning, afternoon or evening.”

EurekAlert: New archaeological discoveries highlight lack of protections for submerged Indigenous sites

EurekAlert: New archaeological discoveries highlight lack of protections for submerged Indigenous sites. “New archaeological research highlights major blind spots in Australia’s environmental management policies, placing submerged Indigenous heritage at risk. The Deep History of Sea Country (DHSC) project team have uncovered a new intertidal stone quarry and stone tool manufacturing site, as well as coastal rock art and engravings, during a land-and-sea archaeological survey off the Pilbara coastline in Western Australia.”

Opinion: For Navajo, crowded homes have always been a lifeline. The pandemic threatens that. (Washington Post)

Washington Post: Opinion: For Navajo, crowded homes have always been a lifeline. The pandemic threatens that.. “Kay Atene’s family lives together on the same red earth in Oljato-Monument Valley in Utah that her great-grandparents returned to after surviving the ‘Long Walk’ more than 150 years ago. Generations living together is central to how the Navajo have navigated crises for centuries. But the coronavirus has put that in jeopardy: Crowded homes have become one of the deadliest places to be during the pandemic.”