University of Alaska: New resource brings Alaskan school children face-to-face with their past

University of Aberdeen: New resource brings Alaskan school children face-to-face with their past. “For more than 10 years archaeologists from the University of Aberdeen have worked alongside the local community in Quinhagak to painstakingly recover and preserve everyday objects that indigenous Yup’ik people used to survive and to celebrate life. Now the story of the project – and the 100,000 items they have recovered – has been turned into a downloadable educational resource which will help school pupils in Alaska and around the world learn about the Yup’ik way of life.”

The Ubyssey: UBC struggles to acquire records for ‘nuanced’ residential school information database

The Ubyssey: UBC struggles to acquire records for ‘nuanced’ residential school information database. “Seven months after opening, the UBC Indian Residential History and Dialogue Centre (IRSHDC) still doesn’t have all the records it needs to complete its mission. And signs of improvement are slow to come.”

Miami Herald: Oral Navajo history, culture preserved on reel-to-reel tape

Miami Herald: Oral Navajo history, culture preserved on reel-to-reel tape . “About five decades have passed since Etsitty Bedonie talked about the ‘Beginning of the Enemies.’ His account about the enemies of the Navajo, as he heard it from his grandfather, was recorded with a reel-to-reel magnetic tape recorder, most likely, at Bedonie’s home in the Crownpoint area around 1969. The interviewer was Tom Ration, a member of the Navajo Cultural Center – a group of Navajos who in the 1960s-1970s traveled around all five regions of the Navajo Nation and interviewed about 450 Navajo men and women and preserved their oral history on audio tape.”

Regina Leader-Post: Miller hoping to glean stories by sharing First Nations University photo archive

Regina Leader-Post: Miller hoping to glean stories by sharing First Nations University photo archive. “In a binder from the First Nations University library, Andrew Miller located a photo dated 1916. ‘Pointed Cap (108 years old) receiving treaty money,’ the image is labelled. Looking closely at the black and white photo, there is much more information to be gleaned.”

University of Nebraska-Lincoln: NEH-funded project brings Salmon Pueblo ruins into digital age

University of Nebraska-Lincoln: NEH-funded project brings Salmon Pueblo ruins into digital age. “The project is designed as an online resource that allows users to search more than 140,500 records, including approximately 11,000 photographs, 29,000 documents and 24 data tables with information on particular artifact types, such as ceramics vessels, ornaments and bone tools. The records are from the comprehensive excavations of the Salmon Pueblo completed in the last 40 years.”

Juneau Empire: Hoonah goes digital, launches trove of historic photos

Juneau Empire: Hoonah goes digital, launches trove of historic photos. “HHF [Huna Heritage Foundation] has been collecting photographs of historical and cultural relevance for the city of Hoonah and the Huna Tlingit people since its inception in the 1990s. Subject matter ranges from the arts, people, and places to activities like logging, fishing and specific events like the Hoonah fire of 1944. Now, through a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services, the organization is working to bring its collection online for easy access by the public.”

Arizona State University: ASU students learn from the dead at Teotihuacan

Arizona State University: ASU students learn from the dead at Teotihuacan. “Teotihuacan was once the largest and most influential city in the ancient new world. Yet its social structure seems to be more egalitarian than those in its fellow ancient cities. ‘Most ancient societies had an elite class that lived in big houses and had big fancy tombs. Then you got the commoners living in little houses and their burials were very simple with no gravestones,’ said Michael E. Smith, a professor in the School of Human Evolution and Social Change at Arizona State University. ‘You don’t seem to have that distinction at Teotihuacan.'”