Global Storybooks: From Arabic to Zulu, freely available digital tales in 50+ languages (The Conversation)

From The Conversation, with a big thanks to Garth W. who pointed it out: Global Storybooks: From Arabic to Zulu, freely available digital tales in 50+ languages. “This portal hosts custom sites with multilingual open-licensed books for over 40 countries and regions on five continents. Our vision is to help democratize global flows of information and resources, to facilitate language learning — including Indigenous languages — and to promote literacy.”

CBC: New Cree language app targets students, teachers and newcomers

CBC: New Cree language app targets students, teachers and newcomers. “More than 150 elders from five northern Alberta First Nations have contributed to a new tool designed to preserve Cree words and phrases. The free app, KTCEA Elders Speak, is a product of the Kee Tas Kee Now Tribal Council Education Authority, which oversees six schools within five northern Alberta First Nations: Peerless Trout First Nation, Whitefish Lake First Nation, Loon River First Nation, Lubicon Lake Band, and Woodland Cree First Nation.”

CBC: Why this ‘language geek’ provides hundreds of Indigenous language tools for free

New-to-me, from CBC: Why this ‘language geek’ provides hundreds of Indigenous language tools for free. “Chris Harvey had a ‘pivotal moment’ when he was in Grade 7. He found a book in the library on how to speak Moose Cree. That’s where he discovered syllabics, what he calls the language of his northern neighbours, and hasn’t looked back since. Harvey, 47, is the man behind… a site that provides keyboards and fonts in more than 100 Indigenous languages, including all of the ones in northern Canada, as well as languages in Australia, New Zealand and the U.S.”

Western Carolina University: Graduate student working to translate Cherokee language from native newspaper

Western Carolina University: Graduate student working to translate Cherokee language from native newspaper. “Constance Owl’s master’s degree thesis is more than a means to a graduate degree in American history. It’s a portal to understanding, and perhaps saving, a disappearing language. Owl, a member of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians who grew up in Cherokee County, is a second-year graduate student at Western Carolina University. She is working with local Cherokee language speakers, Tom Belt and Wiggins Blackfox, to translate portions of the Cherokee Phoenix newspaper, published from about 1828 to 1834 by Elias Boudinot, a formally educated Cherokee.”

TechCrunch: Microsoft adds Māori to translator as New Zealand pushes to revitalize the language

TechCrunch: Microsoft adds Māori to translator as New Zealand pushes to revitalize the language. “The benefits of machine translation are easy to see and experience for ourselves, but those practical applications are only one part of what makes the technology valuable. Microsoft and the government of New Zealand are demonstrating the potential of translation tech to help preserve and hopefully breathe new life into the Māori language.”

Creative Commons: Indian State of Odisha Releases 21 Dictionaries Under CC BY

Creative Commons: Indian State of Odisha Releases 21 Dictionaries Under CC BY. “Recently, CC India’s Global Network Representative (GNC) Subhashish Panigrahi brought to our attention that the Indian state of Odisha licensed 21 dictionaries—in all 21 Indigenous languages that are spoken in the province—under CC BY 4.0. This opens them up for adaptation, distribution, and remixing by anyone.”

RNZ: Digital platform to ease access of te reo Māori for 21st century conversations

RNZ: Digital platform to ease access of te reo Māori for 21st century conversations. “Northland based Te Hiku Media and Dragonfly Data Science have been awarded $13 million over seven years by the government to create a platform, Papa Reo, which will digitise 25 years worth of te reo Māori archives…. The world-irst project will create a te reo digital dataset large enough to be used for machine learning to create chat bots, online education, games, transcription of archival material, and real-time captioning in te reo Māori.”