Johns Hopkins: New data shows COVID-19’s disproportionate impact on American Indian, Alaska Native tribes

Johns Hopkins: New data shows COVID-19’s disproportionate impact on American Indian, Alaska Native tribes. “The Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Center today launched new data and maps tracking the pandemic’s impact across American Indian and Alaska Native communities. Developed in collaboration with the Johns Hopkins Center for American Indian Health and Indian Country Today, the map provides one of the most comprehensive views of how the pandemic has unfolded across more than 100 Tribal Nations.”

New York Times: Marie Wilcox, Who Saved Her Native Language From Extinction, Dies at 87

New York Times: Marie Wilcox, Who Saved Her Native Language From Extinction, Dies at 87. “For many years, Marie Wilcox was the guardian of the Wukchumni language, one of several Indigenous languages that were once common in Central California but have either disappeared or nearly disappeared. She was the only person for a time who could speak it fluently. She started writing down words in Wukchumni as she remembered them in the late 1990s, scrawling on the backs of envelopes and slips of paper. Then she started typing them into an old boxy computer. Soon she was getting up early to devote her day to gathering words and working into the night.”

New York University: NYU, University of Waikato Receive Mellon Foundation Grant to Protect Indigenous Knowledge and Data

New York University: NYU, University of Waikato Receive Mellon Foundation Grant to Protect Indigenous Knowledge and Data. “Equity for Indigenous Research and Innovation Coordinating Hub (ENRICH), launched in 2019, aims to establish and solidify Indigenous cultural authority within digital infrastructures and to increase Indigenous rights within historical records and future research…. Under the Mellon grant, ENRICH will expand its training and resources developed by and for Indigenous communities in order to bolster efforts in the United States, New Zealand, Canada, and Australia to properly connect Indigenous cultural material and data to present-day communities and to establish cultural authority as well as intellectual property legal protections over them.”

Washington Post: Taking Indigenous culture viral

Washington Post: Taking Indigenous culture viral. “In the middle of the Amazon forest, along the banks of the Rio Negro, a young woman in face paint was bored. The coronavirus pandemic had cut off the flow of visitors, further isolating this Indigenous village, accessible only by boat. So Cunhaporanga Tatuyo, 22, was passing her days, phone in hand, trying to learn the ways of TikTok. She danced to songs, dubbed videos, wildly distorted her appearance — the full TikTok experience. None of it found much of an audience. Then she held up a wriggly, thick beetle larva to the camera.”

Smithsonian: Smithsonian To Host the Virtual Symposium “The Other Slavery” Sept. 24–27

Smithsonian: Smithsonian To Host the Virtual Symposium “The Other Slavery” Sept. 24–27. “Stories of enslaved Indigenous peoples have often been absent from the historical narrative. From Sept. 24–27, the Smithsonian will host the virtual symposium ‘The Other Slavery: Histories of Indian Bondage from New Spain to the Southwestern United States,’ which will explore the hidden stories of enslaved Indigenous peoples, focusing on the legacy of Spanish colonization in the Americas and Asia and its impact on what is now the southwestern United States. This program seeks to give a comprehensive first voice to these hushed stories and living legacies.”

Associated Press: Missouri cave with ancient Native American drawings sold

Associated Press: Missouri cave with ancient Native American drawings sold. “Bryan Laughlin, director of Selkirk Auctioneers & Appraisers, the St. Louis-based firm handling the auction, said the winning bidder declined to be named. A St. Louis family that’s owned the land since 1953 has mainly used it for hunting. The cave was the site of sacred rituals and burying of the dead. It also has more than 290 prehistoric glyphs, or hieroglyphic symbols used to represent sounds or meanings, ‘making it the largest collection of indigenous people’s polychrome paintings in Missouri,’ according to the auction website.”

Green Bay Press-Gazette: Ron Corn Jr. is one of fewer than 20 fluent speakers of the Menominee language. He’s working to change that.

Green Bay Press-Gazette: Ron Corn Jr. is one of fewer than 20 fluent speakers of the Menominee language. He’s working to change that.. “The Menominee Nation offers language instruction through its education system, including an immersion program in which small children are fully immersed in the language. But grassroots programs, such as Menomini yoU, allow for tribal citizens, or anyone else not attending Menominee schools, to learn from home any time.Their website… informs users that they can learn at their own pace, whether 10 minutes or four hours a day and whether it’s in the morning, afternoon or evening.”

Phys .org: Importance of saving Indigenous languages

Phys .org: Importance of saving Indigenous languages. “Connection to country, culture and community is intrinsically linked to teaching and retaining Indigenous languages, a Flinders University communications expert says. Flinders University Emeritus Professor Andrew Butcher, who has been researching Aboriginal languages of Australia for more than 30 years, highlights the importance of preserving First Nations language, including pronunciation and other details in a recent paper in three Central Australian languages.”

Toronto Star: Local Indigenous archives and language revitalization underway at KFPL

Toronto Star: Local Indigenous archives and language revitalization underway at KFPL. “An initiative to create and digitize an archive of local Indigenous history is in full steam at the Kingston Frontenac Public Library. Danycka Pereault, an Indigenous woman from the Kingston area has recently joined the team responsible for the work thanks to a grant from Young Canada Works and going towards the StoryMe project.”

Tasmania Examiner: Australian first historical website to illuminate Tasmania’s Indigenous history

Tasmania Examiner: Australian first historical website to illuminate Tasmania’s Indigenous history. “[The site] was believed to be the first site of its kind in Australia and tells the history of the Stoney Creek people who lived in the Tamar Valley for a thousand generations. The website was developed by historian and academic Dr Michael Powell and Indigenous historian Dr Aunty Patsy Cameron. More than 30 Indigenous and non-Indigenous academics, scholars and community members also contributed to the website.

TimesColonist: First Nations win access to archives of Sisters of St. Ann

TimesColonist: First Nations win access to archives of Sisters of St. Ann. “First Nations have won access to the private archives of the Sisters of St. Ann, an order of Catholic nuns that ran four residential schools, including the Kamloops Indian Residential School. The Royal B.C. Museum said Wednesday it had signed a memorandum of agreement with the Sisters of St. Ann to provide access to the order’s archives to the museum and to the Indian Residential School History and Dialogue Centre at UBC.”

Ricochet: Catholic Church residential school records belong to survivors and their families

Ricochet: Catholic Church residential school records belong to survivors and their families. “Beyond base self-preservation, we can imagine Church administrators assure themselves behind closed doors that the decision to keep the records private is morally defensible. Thorny issues of privacy and confidentiality, and the terrifying (if unsubstantiated) prospect of mob justice enacted upon named perpetrators, may foster a paternalistic desire to keep documents hidden. Better to keep the door locked than to expose survivors and staff alike to an onslaught of public scrutiny. But this is not a morally defensible position. These records belong to the people about whom they were written: residential school survivors and their families.”

Dominion Energy: $500k Grant from Dominion Energy Charitable Foundation to Support Virginia HBCU Humanities Research

Dominion Energy: $500k Grant from Dominion Energy Charitable Foundation to Support Virginia HBCU Humanities Research. “Virginia Humanities announced a $500,000 grant from the Dominion Energy Charitable Foundation to help support research by Black and Indigenous scholars, and other scholars of color who are affiliated with Virginia’s historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs), including their alumni outside Virginia and at non-HBCU institutions.”