Alutiiq Museum: Museum Releases Instructions For Making A Beaded Headdress

Alutiiq Museum: Museum Releases Instructions For Making A Beaded Headdress. “Today, the Alutiiq Museum released instructions for making an Alutiiq-style beaded headdress. A paperback book and four accompanying video tutorials provide step-by-step directions for transforming beads, leather, and thread into the iconic Alutiiq woman’s garment.” A PDF version of the book and the videos are available free on the museum’s Web site.

STIR Vancouver: CultureBrew. Art launches national database of Indigenous and racialized artists

STIR Vancouver: CultureBrew.Art launches national database of Indigenous and racialized artists. “CultureBrew.Art seeks to counteract systemic racism in the arts by linking up BIPOC artists in performing, literary, and media arts with decision-makers via a national searchable database. The resource, seven years in the making, is aimed at producers, directors, casting agents, and curators, as well as community and social service agencies, schools and educational institutions, government, and media outlets. It aims to spark collaboration, networking, and employment in the arts.” There are fees for both people who want to be part of and people who want to search the database, but in neither case are they onerous.

Trinity College: With Hidden Literacies Project, Trinity Professors Make Literature by Marginalized Americans More Accessible

Trinity College: With Hidden Literacies Project, Trinity Professors Make Literature by Marginalized Americans More Accessible. “Edited by Trinity College professors, the new digital anthology Hidden Literacies explores texts by marginalized Americans—including Indigenous and enslaved people, prisoners, and young children—that have not traditionally been included in archives and educational curricula. Bringing together leading scholars of historical literacy from across the country, this collection presents high-resolution images of archival documents paired with scholarly commentary on the documents’ history and significance.”

University of Western Australia: Race against time to find Indigenous boab bark art

University of Western Australia: Race against time to find Indigenous boab bark art. “Researchers are working with a group of First Nations Australians in some of the roughest terrain on Earth to document ancient art in the bark of boab trees. Carvings in the boab trees tell the stories of the king brown snake (or Lingka) Dreaming in a remote area of the Tanami Desert, which straddles the border of Western Australia and the Northern Territory.”

Newsfile: Canadian Federation of Library Associations Calls for the Release of all Outstanding Residential School Records

Newsfile: Canadian Federation of Library Associations Calls for the Release of all Outstanding Residential School Records. “The Canadian Federation of Library Associations (CFLA) has sent an open letter to federal Cabinet Ministers calling on their support for the full public release of outstanding residential school records currently being withheld by the Catholic Church and other orders of government.”

OPINION: A new tool to help understand Alaska’s historic Native land claims act (Anchorage Daily News)

Anchorage Daily News: OPINION: A new tool to help understand Alaska’s historic Native land claims act. “To provide future generations insights into this groundbreaking law, the Alaska Historical Society (AHS) has just completed the first-ever comprehensive guide to historical sources about ANCSA. The three-volume, nearly 1,200-page Guide to Sources for the Study of the 1971 Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act identifies the vast majority of documents, located in archives, libraries, personal collections and online.” The guide is freely available and searchable online.

Nunatsiaq News: Digital archive showcases decades of artwork by women of Taloyoak

Nunatsiaq News: Digital archive showcases decades of artwork by women of Taloyoak. “Fifty years after Judy McGrath and Arnaoyok Alookee started a grassroots arts collective for Taloyoak women, a regional heritage society is helping bring it alive online. McGrath and Alookee launched Arnaqarvik in 1972 to create a gathering space and venue for women in Taloyoak to come together, hone their skills and tell their stories through arts and crafts.”

Australian Arts Review: Tarnanthi Art Fair goes online in 2022 with thousands of works from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artists

Australian Arts Review: Tarnanthi Art Fair goes online in 2022 with thousands of works from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artists. “The Art Gallery of South Australia’s popular Tarnanthi Art Fair will return as an online event from Friday 14 to Monday 17 October 2022. Bigger than ever before, the 2022 Tarnanthi Art Fair will also offer a series of public programs including creative workshops both online and in person, language tutorials in Kaurna, Pitjantjatjara and Yankunytjatjara, and an online discussion about buying art ethically.”

Bard College: Bard Graduate Center Faculty Member Aaron Glass Awarded $150,000 NEH Grant to Support Enhanced Accessibility for the Digital Publication of Indigenous Cultural Heritage Materials

Bard College: Bard Graduate Center Faculty Member Aaron Glass Awarded $150,000 NEH Grant to Support Enhanced Accessibility for the Digital Publication of Indigenous Cultural Heritage Materials. “Bard Graduate Center Associate Professor Aaron Glass has been awarded a $150,000 Digital Humanities Advancement Grant from the National Endowment of the Humanities (NEH) to support his collaborative project to create a critical, annotated, digitized edition of anthropologist Franz Boas’s landmark 1897 monograph on the Kwakwaka’wakw culture of the Pacific Northwest Coast.”

Utah State University: USU Anthropology Student, Vet Med Faculty Identify Object in Centuries-Old Indigenous Pouch

Utah State University: USU Anthropology Student, Vet Med Faculty Identify Object in Centuries-Old Indigenous Pouch. “Anthropologists sometimes work with animal remains in the course of understanding how human societies lived, but they rarely cross paths with veterinarians, who focus on treating living animals. However, when anthropology graduate student Alexandra Wolberg needed to analyze an unusual Indigenous pouch without damaging it, the College of Veterinary Medicine had a unique opportunity to support one of Utah State University’s anthropologists.”

University of Maine: New exhibit featuring 3D-printed replica of 19th-century helmet opens at Hudson Museum

University of Maine: New exhibit featuring 3D-printed replica of 19th-century helmet opens at Hudson Museum. “The original Tlingit Frog Clan Helmet, carved out of yellow cedar, painted in green and red pigments and inlaid with abalone shell discs that were previously attached to a textile, sits alongside its identical replica. The 3D printed model was created by engineers from UMaine’s Advanced Structures and Composites Center and graduate students from the Intermedia Programs. Both helmets are surrounded by photos depicting the stages in the process to create the replica and panels describing how the original helmet came to the museum, what sparked the efforts to recreate it, who worked on the project and their roles.”

KYUK: KYUK to receive $350,000 grant to digitally preserve and catalog decades of archival material

KYUK: KYUK to receive $350,000 grant to digitally preserve and catalog decades of archival material. “The KYUK station, our humble building in the center of town, is responsible for the largest collection of video and audio footage documenting the Yukon-Kuskokwim (Y-K) Delta. For decades, that collection was entirely physical: old tapes and VHS lining rows of shelves in the back of the building. Now, thanks to a $350,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, KYUK is bringing that archive into the 21st century and protecting it for future generations.”

Washington Post: Residential schools banned native languages. The Cree want theirs back.

Washington Post: Residential schools banned native languages. The Cree want theirs back.. “Across Canada, the often brutal residential school system, designed to assimilate Indigenous people into White, European culture, succeeded in breaking the tradition of passing on languages from generation to generation — and put the survival of some in jeopardy. But now, 25 years after the last residential school was shuttered, some Indigenous communities — including the one here that Pope Francis visited Monday — are reviving and relearning their native languages.” Please be advised that the first few paragraphs in this story have references to sexual abuse.

University of Melbourne: Bringing A Living Archive To Life

University of Melbourne: Bringing A Living Archive To Life . “Working with Indigenous partners and students in Australia and the US, we are engaging in creative practices, including storytelling through possum-skin cloak-making, intercultural collaborations and supporting the research through teaching and learning. These steps aim to enliven archived collections by making and doing, finding new ways to support Indigenous knowledges and stories.”