CBC: New Cree language app targets students, teachers and newcomers

CBC: New Cree language app targets students, teachers and newcomers. “More than 150 elders from five northern Alberta First Nations have contributed to a new tool designed to preserve Cree words and phrases. The free app, KTCEA Elders Speak, is a product of the Kee Tas Kee Now Tribal Council Education Authority, which oversees six schools within five northern Alberta First Nations: Peerless Trout First Nation, Whitefish Lake First Nation, Loon River First Nation, Lubicon Lake Band, and Woodland Cree First Nation.”

Western Carolina University: Graduate student working to translate Cherokee language from native newspaper

Western Carolina University: Graduate student working to translate Cherokee language from native newspaper. “Constance Owl’s master’s degree thesis is more than a means to a graduate degree in American history. It’s a portal to understanding, and perhaps saving, a disappearing language. Owl, a member of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians who grew up in Cherokee County, is a second-year graduate student at Western Carolina University. She is working with local Cherokee language speakers, Tom Belt and Wiggins Blackfox, to translate portions of the Cherokee Phoenix newspaper, published from about 1828 to 1834 by Elias Boudinot, a formally educated Cherokee.”

National Tribune: Queenslands lost hi 1800s Indigenous police database launched at museum

National Tribune: Queenslands lost hi 1800s Indigenous police database launched at museum. Not sure what’s going on with the headline. “The archive – the Frontier Conflict and the Native Mounted Police in Queensland Database – is the result of a four-year project funded by the Australian Research Council (ARC) and undertaken by University of Southern Queensland (USQ), Flinders University, The University of Notre Dame, James Cook University and Northern Archaeology Consultancies. It was launched at Queensland Museum yesterday (December 9) and includes more than 11,000 documents about 200 Native Mounted Police camps, 12,000 artefacts, 400 officers, 850 troopers and 1800 frontier conflict events across Queensland through the 19th century.”

Radio New Zealand: Online resource journeys through hidden history of Waipā

Radio New Zealand: Online resource journeys through hidden history of Waipā. “Te Ara Wai Journeys is a self-guided tour of New Zealand Land Wars battle sites, landscapes and early settlements around the district. The website was launched on Friday by the Waipā District Council.” If you’d like an overview of the New Zealand Land Wars, check out This page from Christchurch City Council Libraries.

CBC: Inuit sharing ancient knowledge of ice, sea and land with new app

CBC: Inuit sharing ancient knowledge of ice, sea and land with new app . “A social media app geared toward the outdoor lives of Inuit launched Wednesday with features that tie traditional knowledge to smartphone technology. The Siku app and web platform, named after the Inuktitut word for sea ice, allows users to trade observations about dangerous conditions, document wildlife sightings and trade hunting stories.”

The Guardian: The cultural pioneers bringing oral storytelling to the next generation

The Guardian: The cultural pioneers bringing oral storytelling to the next generation. “For millennia, Indigenous Australian communities have been passing down histories, knowledge, language and customs, largely through oral storytelling. But in a world of digital addiction, where even the most remote parts of the country are being infiltrated by smartphones, telling stories via screens is the new necessary: a way to both preserve tradition and reach out to the young.”

Phys .org: Scientists race to document Puerto Rico’s coastal heritage

Phys .org: Scientists race to document Puerto Rico’s coastal heritage. “A group of U.S.-based scientists is rushing to document indigenous sites along Puerto Rico’s coast dating back a couple of thousand years before rising sea levels linked to climate change destroy a large chunk of the island’s heritage that is still being discovered.”