Billings Gazette: New Crow language app launches

Billings Gazette: New Crow language app launches . “For years, organizers have been collecting a massive database of Crow words, comparing nuance about their meanings and translations, and seeking out as many speakers of the language as possible — all with the goal of creating a new way for people to learn the language. It’s ready. A new Crow language app launched in mid-November, offering convenient access to a wealth of knowledge. ”

The Star (Malaysia): Alena Murang launches virtual platform Project Ranih to archive Kelabit folk songs

The Star (Malaysia): Alena Murang launches virtual platform Project Ranih to archive Kelabit folk songs . “Have you heard the Leleun Kuh Ba’o Buda, a beautiful lullaby from a mother monkey to her baby? What about Piu’ Piu’ Alung Alung, a chant-song about a child who is good at fishing? Kuching-born KL-based musician/artist Alena Murang, 31, and her cousin Joshua Maran grew up listening to these Kelabit children’s folk songs. Now, the cousin-duo want to share it with the world via their newly launched Project Ranih, an online archive of Kelabit children’s songs and rhymes (complete with lyrics in Kelabit and English).” New, still in progress.

University of Melbourne: Partnership helps lay the foundations for treaty making in Australia

University of Melbourne: Partnership helps lay the foundations for treaty making in Australia. “Launched in a partnership between the University of Melbourne and the National Native Title Council, the new Agreements, Treaties and Negotiated Settlements (ATNS) website is a resource that aims to empower Traditional Owners through information, capturing the range and variety of agreement making with First Nations peoples in Australia and other parts of the world. Its purpose is to encourage transparency and knowledge around agreement making with a focus on nation building, First Nations governance and treaty making.”

KTOO: Sealaska Heritage Institute awarded federal grant to publish Tlingit, Haida archives for language revitalization project

KTOO: Sealaska Heritage Institute awarded federal grant to publish Tlingit, Haida archives for language revitalization project. “Late Tlingit scholars Nora Ḵeixwnéi Marks and Richard Xwaayeenák̲ Dauenhauer once dedicated the first volume of their book ‘Classics of Tlingit Oral Literature’ to Tlingit orators. They co-edited the four-volume series and were two-time winners of the American Book Award. The couple carried the knowledge of Southeast Alaska’s Native languages into the 21st century. Recently, the federal Institute of Museum and Library Services awarded Sealaska Heritage Institute a two-year grant to process and digitally publish a massive collection of Tlingit and Haida documents archived by the late scholars.”

Sydney Arts Guide: Carriberrie Website Celebrates Indigenous Song And Dance This NAIDOC Week

Sydney Arts Guide: Carriberrie Website Celebrates Indigenous Song And Dance This NAIDOC Week. “The National Film and Sound Archive of Australia (NFSA) is marking NAIDOC Week 2020 with the release of Carriberrie, a breathtaking online journey of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander song and dance from the traditional to the contemporary, set across stunning Australian landscapes. Carriberrie features 156 dancers, 23 performances and nine cultural groups, and is available online now.”

SBS News: You can now hear 50 everyday words spoken in Indigenous languages from across Australia

SBS News: You can now hear 50 everyday words spoken in Indigenous languages from across Australia. “A new online resource is educating Australians about how to communicate using Indigenous words in the hopes of maintaining the languages.”

The Spinoff: The website helping Māori access crucial data about their own communities

The Spinoff: The website helping Māori access crucial data about their own communities. “A new website has consolidated data about and involving Māori, making it easier for iwi groups, trusts and Māori communities to access the statistics that impact their lives. A collaboration years in the making, the new Figure NZ and Callaghan Innovation website Pātaka Raraunga aims to make Māori data access easier for everyone. Consolidating thousands of data sets from hundreds of sources into one hub with tools, reports and graphs all about Māori, it’s been made to help Māori find out more about themselves.”

WBUR: Online Exhibit At Harvard’s Peabody Museum Elevates Wampanoag Voices

WBUR: Online Exhibit At Harvard’s Peabody Museum Elevates Wampanoag Voices. “‘Listening to Wampanoag Voices: Beyond 1620’ features artists, storytellers and researchers, discussing some of their cultural items and photographs that are housed in the museum’s collection. “Early on, we decided to blur the focus on the 17th century,” says Meredith Vasta, collections steward at the Peabody. ‘We wanted to look at more contemporary lives and perspectives of Wampanoag people.'”

Smithsonian Magazine: A Native American Community in Baltimore Reclaims Its History

Smithsonian Magazine: A Native American Community in Baltimore Reclaims Its History. “Baltimore may be famous for John Waters, Edgar Allan Poe, and steamed crabs, but very few people are aware that there was once a sizeable population of American Indians, the Lumbee tribe, who lived in the neighborhoods of Upper Fells Point and Washington Hill. By the 1960s, there were so many Native Americans living in the area that many Lumbee affectionately referred to it as ‘The Reservation.’ In the early 1970s, this part of Baltimore underwent a massive urban renewal development project and many Lumbee residences were destroyed, including most of the 1700 block of East Baltimore Street.”

The Eastern Door: Preserving History Through Beadwork Project

The Eastern Door: Preserving History Through Beadwork Project. “The Kanien’kehá:ka Onkwawén:na Raotitióhkwa Language and Cultural Center (KOR) recently launched the Kahnawake Beadwork Oral History Project, which seeks to collect, preserve and share the community’s stories and records related to beadwork. “The purpose of the project is for cultural community enrichment, historical preservation and scholarly research,” said Karonhiióstha Shea Sky, the former cultural development officer at KOR.”

‘There are no words’: As coronavirus kills Indigenous elders, endangered languages face extinction (Washington Post)

Washington Post: ‘There are no words’: As coronavirus kills Indigenous elders, endangered languages face extinction. “The old man knew he was dying. The disease he’d been warning of for weeks had taken hold, and it wouldn’t be long now. He looked to his son, who would soon be the leader of what remained of their people. The old man was fluent in five languages, but the one he chose to speak now was one that virtually no one else in the world could understand.”

Olympic .org: Catherine Freeman’s Golden Olympic Moment To Last Thousands Of Years With New Technology

Olympic .org: Catherine Freeman’s Golden Olympic Moment To Last Thousands Of Years With New Technology. “To celebrate the 20th anniversary of the Olympic Games Sydney 2000, the famous white exterior sails of the Sydney Opera House are becoming an enormous movie screen, showing Australian Catherine Freeman’s 400-metre gold medal win on 25 September 2000. She ran her final in 49.11 seconds, becoming the first Aboriginal athlete to win gold in an individual event at the Olympic Games. The cinematic event celebrates not only Freeman’s historic achievement, but also its audiovisual preservation for future generations on an innovative, sustainable, long-term storage technology called ‘synthetic DNA’.”

Reuters: Australia asks Google to block users ‘walking’ sacred site

Reuters: Australia asks Google to block users ‘walking’ sacred site . “Australia in 2019 closed Uluru, formerly known as Ayers Rock, after a decades-long campaign by indigenous communities to protect it. Parks Australia, which is responsible for the national park where Uluru is located, said Google images contains photographs of the sacred site, which effectively defies the ban.” Google put Uluru on Google Street View in 2017. According to an Australian news source, Google has removed the images.

The Hill / Changing America: Native American communities make a final push to get out the vote this November

The Hill / Changing America: Native American communities make a final push to get out the vote this November. “Many Native American households lack access to the internet, where the census count is taking place for the first time ever, and in-person efforts were postponed due to COVID-19. Now, members of the community are concerned that they will be disenfranchised yet again at the ballot box. The nonprofit is hosting two virtual town halls on Facebook about the importance of voting and representation on Sept. 22, National Voter Registration Day, and Oct. 14. A new website includes resources for Native American people to check their voter registration and make a plan to vote safely.”

Donald Warne: We Need More Indigenous Doctors, Stat. Here’s How to Do It. (Mother Jones)

Mother Jones: Donald Warne: We Need More Indigenous Doctors, Stat. Here’s How to Do It.. “A member of the Oglala Lakota tribe from the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota, Dr. Donald Warne had an early interest in medical work—he comes from a long line of traditional healers. Today, Warne oversees the Master of Public Health degree program and a specialized PhD in Indigenous Health at the University of North Dakota. He’s also the director of Indians into Medicine, a program that creates much-needed pathways for Indigenous students to enter careers in health. Like other communities of color, Native Americans have been hit hard by COVID-19, with seven different tribes currently seeing case rates between 2,200 and 12,850 per 100,000—higher than the rates of any US state.”