CBC: Inuit sharing ancient knowledge of ice, sea and land with new app

CBC: Inuit sharing ancient knowledge of ice, sea and land with new app . “A social media app geared toward the outdoor lives of Inuit launched Wednesday with features that tie traditional knowledge to smartphone technology. The Siku app and web platform, named after the Inuktitut word for sea ice, allows users to trade observations about dangerous conditions, document wildlife sightings and trade hunting stories.”

The Guardian: The cultural pioneers bringing oral storytelling to the next generation

The Guardian: The cultural pioneers bringing oral storytelling to the next generation. “For millennia, Indigenous Australian communities have been passing down histories, knowledge, language and customs, largely through oral storytelling. But in a world of digital addiction, where even the most remote parts of the country are being infiltrated by smartphones, telling stories via screens is the new necessary: a way to both preserve tradition and reach out to the young.”

Phys .org: Scientists race to document Puerto Rico’s coastal heritage

Phys .org: Scientists race to document Puerto Rico’s coastal heritage. “A group of U.S.-based scientists is rushing to document indigenous sites along Puerto Rico’s coast dating back a couple of thousand years before rising sea levels linked to climate change destroy a large chunk of the island’s heritage that is still being discovered.”

University of North Carolina: Archaeologists open ‘virtual museum’ of ancient NC history online

University of North Carolina: Archaeologists open ‘virtual museum’ of ancient NC history online. “The public got its first peek at decades of work by Carolina archaeologists when the new interactive website, Ancient North Carolinians: A Virtual Museum of North Carolina Archaeology, launched Nov. 15. Using lesson plans, travel guides and a gallery of 3D artifact images, AncientNC raises awareness of the 15,000-year history of North Carolina’s indigenous populations and provides educational resources for the state’s teachers and students.”

National Library of New Zealand: Mrs Grimke’s scripture cards

National Library of New Zealand: Mrs Grimke’s scripture cards. “Last year the Library began looking into the possibilities of digitising all the publications listed in the Books in Māori bibliography. After the helpful feedback we got from the people who attended last year’s hui and some further research into the collection, we’ve decided to begin this project with two strands of work. Firstly we will digitise Te Kāhiti o Niu Tireni up to 1900, which is one of the serials listed in ‘Books in Māori’ (BIM). Te Kāhiti was the te reo version of the New Zealand Gazette, which primarily focused on applications and decisions made by the Native Land Court (later known as the Māori Land Court).”

KNOM: Alaska Native Voices from WWII Are Focus of Historical Project

KNOM: Alaska Native Voices from WWII Are Focus of Historical Project. “IN AUGUST, the National Center for American Indian Enterprise Development recognized forty Native leaders around the country for their ’40 Under 40 Awards,’ including Dr. Holly Miowak Guise, an Inupiaq woman raised in Anchorage and Unalakleet. The center recognizes Indigenous leaders across the U.S. for making significant impacts in business or their community. KNOM’s Emily Hofstaedter spoke with Dr. Guise about how she’s working to bring the history of Alaska Natives in World War II to a wider audience.” This is an audio interview but it has a lot of excerpts.

NPR: Historic Recordings Revitalize Language For Passamaquoddy Tribal Members

NPR: Historic Recordings Revitalize Language For Passamaquoddy Tribal Members. “Dwayne Tomah sits at his kitchen table in Perry, Maine, and pulls up an audio file on his computer. When he hits play, the speakers emit a cracked, slightly garbled recording. Through the white noise, Tomah scratches out the words he hears, rewinding every few seconds. Word by word, Tomah is attempting to transcribe and interpret dozens of recordings of Passamaquoddy tribal members, some of which are only recently being heard and publicly shared for the first time in more than a century.”