Phys .org: Research team developing Indigenous languages app

Phys .org: Research team developing Indigenous languages app . “… [Dr. Marguerite] Koole, an assistant professor of curriculum studies in the College of Education at the University of Saskatchewan (USask), is working with a team of teachers, researchers and programmers from across campus in order to launch a web-based database to help educators revive Indigenous languages. The database, named wîcêhtowin, contains information and links to websites, video/audio repositories, and apps designed to improve language knowledge.”

CBC: Online database for Inuit art looking for Nunatsiavut artists

CBC: Online database for Inuit art looking for Nunatsiavut artists. “The Inuit Art Foundation is looking for Nunatsiavut artists to add to their growing online database, which highlights Inuit artists from across Canada. The IAF’s goal is to broaden the public’s awareness of the history of Inuit art and to connect artists with researchers or anyone who is interested in the art an artist creates.”

Slate: The Complicated Decisions That Come With Digitizing Indigenous Languages

Slate: The Complicated Decisions That Come With Digitizing Indigenous Languages. “When Europeans first made contact with tribes across the continent, more than 2,000 languages were being spoken. Today, after centuries of forced relocations, broken treaties, abusive residential schools, and other discriminatory practices, only 256 languages are spoken. A full 199 are endangered, according to the Catalogue of Endangered Languages. Yet even after everything those communities endured, they’re fighting for their words—and the ability to protect them. New technology like smartphone keyboards, language-learning apps, and digital databases makes revitalization work easier than ever, but it also requires hard conversations about which parts of a language must be kept offline.”

Minecraft: Education Edition gets a new world focused on the Māori culture (Neowin)

Neowin: Minecraft: Education Edition gets a new world focused on the Māori culture. “Now, Minecraft: Education Edition’s New Zealand team has unveiled a brand new world for learners, focusing on the indigenous Māori culture in the country. Coromandel-based Piki Studios, the driving force behind the creation of the first official world for the title based in New Zealand, has now also become an official member of the Minecraft Partner Program.”

Alaska Native News: National Science Foundation Supports Additional Alutiiq Language Research

Alaska Native News: National Science Foundation Supports Additional Alutiiq Language Research. “With a $56,462 grant from the National Science Foundation (award #1360839), the Alutiiq Museum will extend its Naken–Natmen (Where From–Where To) language project for an additional year. First funded in 2014, the multi-year project improved access to Alutiiq language resources by developing an online archive of Alutiiq recordings, creating an Alutiiq speaker registry, and planning future language documentation projects. Now, a supplemental grant will allow the museum to study rare examples of written Alutiiq preserved in historic texts.”

CBC: Hear Indigenous language speakers from around the globe through Google Earth

CBC: Hear Indigenous language speakers from around the globe through Google Earth. “Users of Google Earth are now able to hear over 50 Indigenous language speakers from across the globe saying words and simple phrases and even singing traditional songs. The project, called Celebrating Indigenous Languages, is designed to honour the United Nations International Year of Indigenous Languages.”

Nunatsiaq News: Toronto gallery to digitize almost 100,000 Cape Dorset prints, drawings

Nunatsiaq News: Toronto gallery to digitize almost 100,000 Cape Dorset prints, drawings. “Artists and art enthusiasts will soon have access to a digital collection of around 100,000 Cape Dorset drawings and prints. A project from the McMichael Canadian Art Collection, called Iningat Ilagiit, which means ‘a place for family,’ will act as a digital gallery. It will showcase prints and drawings from the West Baffin Eskimo Co-op between 1959 and 1989.”