KVAL: UO museum works to digitize collection of fragile Native American baskets

KVAL: UO museum works to digitize collection of fragile Native American baskets. “Close up and through a camera – that’s what’s happening quietly behind the scenes at the University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History….Teams from the museum are digitizing the UO’s entire collection of historic Native American baskets, a project made possible through grants from the State Heritage Commission and other sources.” There’s a video news story that goes with this — about two and a half minutes — that’s worth watching.

My Yellowknife Now: Library and Archives Canada funds projects to help preserve Indigenous culture and language recordings

My Yellowknife Now: Library and Archives Canada funds projects to help preserve Indigenous culture and language recordings. “Library and Archives Canada (LAC) is providing $2.3 million to support 31 projects by First Nations, Inuit and Métis Nation organizations. As part of the Government of Canada’s reconciliation efforts, LAC is supporting Indigenous communities as they seek to preserve and make accessible their existing audio and video heritage for future generations.”

South Dakota State University: SDSU Extension Releases Dakota and Lakota Traditional Games Resource Guide

South Dakota State University: SDSU Extension Releases Dakota and Lakota Traditional Games Resource Guide. “SDSU Extension recently released a resource guide on traditional Dakota and Lakota games. The free, downloadable guide contains six traditional Dakota games and six traditional Lakota games, including photos, instructions on how to play and how to craft the game pieces.” Not the largest resource I’ve ever mentioned, but not the kind of resource I see very often, either…

CBC: Why this ‘language geek’ provides hundreds of Indigenous language tools for free

New-to-me, from CBC: Why this ‘language geek’ provides hundreds of Indigenous language tools for free. “Chris Harvey had a ‘pivotal moment’ when he was in Grade 7. He found a book in the library on how to speak Moose Cree. That’s where he discovered syllabics, what he calls the language of his northern neighbours, and hasn’t looked back since. Harvey, 47, is the man behind… a site that provides keyboards and fonts in more than 100 Indigenous languages, including all of the ones in northern Canada, as well as languages in Australia, New Zealand and the U.S.”

ABC News (Australia): Bangarra Dance Theatre marks 30 years with digital archive and exhibition

ABC News (Australia): Bangarra Dance Theatre marks 30 years with digital archive and exhibition. “In October 1989, Australia’s premiere Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander dance company was born around a kitchen table in the Sydney suburb of Glebe. The kitchen belonged to South-African born Cheryl Stone, a founding student of the National Aboriginal Islander Skills Development Association (NAISDA).”

Creative Commons: Indian State of Odisha Releases 21 Dictionaries Under CC BY

Creative Commons: Indian State of Odisha Releases 21 Dictionaries Under CC BY. “Recently, CC India’s Global Network Representative (GNC) Subhashish Panigrahi brought to our attention that the Indian state of Odisha licensed 21 dictionaries—in all 21 Indigenous languages that are spoken in the province—under CC BY 4.0. This opens them up for adaptation, distribution, and remixing by anyone.”

Mirage News: Archie Roach’s story told in new online exhibition

Mirage News: Archie Roach’s story told in new online exhibition. “Archie Roach’s powerful songs tell his story of heartbreaking loss, love and healing through music. He is a Gunditjmara and Bundjalung man, born in Mooroopna, Victoria in 1956. A musician, author and human rights campaigner, Archie is also a member of the Stolen Generations. He was forcibly separated from his family when he was two years old, placed into foster care and told he was an orphan.”