EIN Presswire: Ho-Chunk Nation Releases Milestone Indigenous Language Digital Dictionary

EIN Presswire: Ho-Chunk Nation Releases Milestone Indigenous Language Digital Dictionary (PRESS RELEASE). “On July 30, 2022, Ho-Chunk Nation is proudly releasing their dictionary at the General Council in Madison, Wisconsin…. The new Hoocąk Wazijaci dictionary is freely available online and via mobile download. It includes nearly 12,000 entries and over 9,000 example sentences.”

Ars Technica: Lidar reveals networks of pre-Columbian cities and towns in Bolivia

Ars Technica: Lidar reveals networks of pre-Columbian cities and towns in Bolivia. “An airborne lidar survey recently revealed the long-hidden ruins of 11 pre-Columbian Indigenous towns in what is now northern Bolivia. The survey also revealed previously unseen details of defensive walls and complex ceremonial buildings at 17 other settlements in the area, built by a culture about which archaeologists still know very little: the Casarabe.”

The First News: Extraordinary life of Józef Piłsudski’s older brother told in new website

The First News: Extraordinary life of Józef Piłsudski’s older brother told in new website. “The extraordinary life of Józef Piłsudski’s older brother Bronisław is showcased in the first website dedicated to the man many regarded as a real king…. After being exiled to Sakhalin Island in the far east of the Russian Empire, Bronisław soon learned the language of one of the most mysterious peoples in the world, the Ainu, and set about documenting the life and culture of the island’s people.”

CBC: N.W.T. museum digitizes hundreds of fine art pieces in new online collection

CBC: N.W.T. museum digitizes hundreds of fine art pieces in new online collection. “The Northwest Territories’ Prince of Wales Heritage Centre is making hundreds of its fine art items searchable online, something museum curatorial assistant Ryan Silke says will bring one of the biggest collections of northern sculptures, paintings, prints and textiles to users without leaving their home.”

NBC News: As omicron lurks, Native Americans wary of boosters

NBC News: As omicron lurks, Native Americans wary of boosters. “Nationally, 72 percent of American Indians and Alaska Natives of all ages had received at least one dose of a Covid vaccine as of March 28, and 59 percent were fully vaccinated — having received two doses of Moderna’s or Pfizer-BioNTech’s vaccine or one dose of Johnson & Johnson’s. A much smaller share had received booster shots — 44 percent of fully vaccinated Native Americans ages 12 and up, below the booster rates for whites, Asian Americans, and Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders.”

New York Times: How Native Americans Are Trying to Debug A.I.’s Biases

New York Times: How Native Americans Are Trying to Debug A.I.’s Biases. “Ms. [Chamisa] Edmo explained that tagging results are often ‘outlandish’ and ‘offensive,’ recalling how one app identified a Native American person wearing regalia as a bird. And yet similar image recognition apps have identified with ease a St. Patrick’s Day celebration, Ms. [Davar] Ardalan noted as an example, because of the abundance of data on the topic. As Mr. [Tracy] Monteith put it, A.I. is only as good as the data it is fed. And data on cultures that have long been marginalized, like Native ones, are simply not at the levels they need to be.”

CBC: Oblates to open Rome archives next month for residential school records search

CBC: Oblates to open Rome archives next month for residential school records search. “The National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation (NCTR) plans to begin a search as soon as next month in the archives of a Roman Catholic order that ran 48 residential schools in Canada, including the institution in Kamloops, B.C., where last year more than 200 unmarked graves were discovered. Raymond Frogner, head of archives for the NCTR, will be visiting the Rome archives of the Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate to review and digitize residential school-related records. It’s the first time any Canadian researcher has been granted access to the Oblate General Archives.”

CBC: Innovative atlas puts Indigenous knowledge on the map — literally — to help tackle climate crisis

CBC: Innovative atlas puts Indigenous knowledge on the map — literally — to help tackle climate crisis. “Hetxw’ms Gyetxw is Gitxsan, a matrilineal society which doesn’t use last names. He goes by his full traditional name…. The Indigenous Knowledges component of the Climate Atlas of Canada, launched today, is the culmination of years of work by Hetxw’ms Gyetxw and the team at the University of Winnipeg’s Prairie Climate Centre, in collaboration with Indigenous communities across the country. “

Associated Press: Tech tool tribe uses to save language

Associated Press: Tech tool tribe uses to save language. “By itself, being able to read smartphone home screens in Cherokee won’t be enough to safeguard the indigenous language, endangered after a long history of erasure. But it might be a step toward immersing younger tribal citizens in the language spoken by a dwindling number of their elders. That’s the hope of Principal Chief Richard Sneed of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, who is counting on more inclusive consumer technology — and the involvement of a major tech company — to help out.”

Saskatchewan Polytechnic: Innovative digitization toolkit preserves Indigenous history

Saskatchewan Polytechnic: Innovative digitization toolkit preserves Indigenous history. “When Chasity Berast, program head and instructor for the Saskatchewan Polytechnic Library & Information Technology program, was approached by Harry Lafond of Muskeg Lake Cree Nation to assist with creating a digital archive for their analog records, an idea was born. Rather than sending a student to archive Muskeg Lake Cree Nation’s records, Berast wanted to collaborate with the First Nation to create a digitization toolkit on best practices. Through this process Berast could test best practices while creating the toolkit and helping digitize Muskeg Lake Cree Nation’s archives.”

World Economic Forum: 1,500 endangered languages could disappear by the end of the century

World Economic Forum: 1,500 endangered languages could disappear by the end of the century. “There are 7,000 documented languages currently spoken across the world, but half of them could be endangered, according to a new study. It is predicted that 1,500 known languages may no longer be spoken by the end of this century. Researchers from The Australian National University (ANU) analyzed thousands of languages to identify factors that put endangered ones at risk. The findings highlight a link between higher levels of schooling and language loss, as regionally dominant languages taught in class often overshadow indigenous tongues.”

Stuff New Zealand: Iwi wants to protect and own their memories with archive partnership

Stuff New Zealand: Iwi wants to protect and own their memories with archive partnership. Iwi is a way to describe a particular kind of Māori group. I think in America a similar word would be tribe. “Ngāi Tahu has leased state-of-the-art office and archive space to store its historical papers and research the history of the tribe in a bid to ‘own their own memory’. The iwi has taken out a three-year lease on space in an Archives New Zealand building in Christchurch. The building houses hundreds of boxes of iwi files dating back to the 1940s, with 4000 boxes of files being sorted for possible future storage at the facility.”

Penn State University: Libraries launches Library Guide for Indigenous Peoples in Pennsylvania History

Penn State University: Libraries launches Library Guide for Indigenous Peoples in Pennsylvania History. “Penn State University Libraries recently completed development of a new Library Guide to Indigenous Peoples in Pennsylvania History. Finalized in November, in time for the observance of Native American Heritage Month, the Library Guide is a collection of resources related to the history of Native Americans in Pennsylvania, including maps, treaties and land appropriations.”

CBC: Hundreds of Blackfoot artifacts are held in British museums. Here’s how one project bridges the gap

CBC: Hundreds of Blackfoot artifacts are held in British museums. Here’s how one project bridges the gap. “In 2019, a group of researchers, Blackfoot elders and students from southern Alberta and Montana travelled to England to view Blackfoot items held in three museum collections…. Three years later, the culmination of the work undertaken is available on the Mootookakio’ssin website. The interactive website allows users to interact with historic non-sacred Blackfoot belongings that previously were only seen in museums.”