Library and Archives Canada: A new Google map to search for Indigenous-related collection items

Thanks to Paul P. for the heads-up! Library and Archives Canada: A new Google map to search for Indigenous-related collection items. “Over the past three years, We Are Here: Sharing Stories has digitized and described over 590,000 images of archival and published materials related to First Nations, Inuit and the Métis Nation….In order to make it easier to locate recently digitized Indigenous heritage content at LAC, we have created a searchable list of the collections and introduced a Google map feature – allowing users to browse archival materials by geographic region!”

Alaska Native News: Alutiiq Museum to Create Online Database of Ancestral Collections

Alaska Native News: Alutiiq Museum to Create Online Database of Ancestral Collections. “With a $32,578 grant from the US Bureau of Indian Affairs, the Sun’aq Tribe of Kodiak and the Alutiiq Museum are collaborating on a tool that will help people locate, view, and study Alutiiq objects in the world’s museums. The Amutat project, which started this month, will begin developing a database of ancestral Alutiiq objects linked to the museum’s website. Visitors to the page will be able to search and study a wide range of Alutiiq tools, clothes, and ceremonial pieces assembled in one place.”

Sydney Arts Guide: Carriberrie Website Celebrates Indigenous Song And Dance This NAIDOC Week

Sydney Arts Guide: Carriberrie Website Celebrates Indigenous Song And Dance This NAIDOC Week. “The National Film and Sound Archive of Australia (NFSA) is marking NAIDOC Week 2020 with the release of Carriberrie, a breathtaking online journey of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander song and dance from the traditional to the contemporary, set across stunning Australian landscapes. Carriberrie features 156 dancers, 23 performances and nine cultural groups, and is available online now.”

InDaily: Zonfrillo’s $1.25m SA-funded Indigenous food database “launched”

InDaily: Zonfrillo’s $1.25m SA-funded Indigenous food database “launched”. “Celebrity chef Jock Zonfrillo’s controversial Orana Foundation is hailing the delivery of a ‘final Milestone Report’ to the South Australian Government for its $1.25 million taxpayer-funded Indigenous Food Database – although it’s unclear when or even if the resource will become publicly available.”

National Indigenous Times: New online resources help Indigenous people trace ancestors

National Indigenous Times: New online resources help Indigenous people trace ancestors. “A series of introductory videos and virtual seminars, Finding Your Ancestors was created in collaboration with members of the NSW Aboriginal community and historians, Paul Irish and Michael Bennett. The resources aim to assist Aboriginal people in New South Wales with tracing their bloodlines to learn about their family and ancestors. The resources were developed to address the concern that whilst there is a wealth of online information for non-Indigenous people to track their family history, there is little support and guidance for Aboriginal people.”

New York Times: The Coronavirus Unleashed Along the Amazon River

New York Times: The Coronavirus Unleashed Along the Amazon River. “As the pandemic assails Brazil, overwhelming it with more than two million infections and more than 84,000 deaths — second only to the United States — the virus is taking an exceptionally high toll on the Amazon region and the people who have depended on its abundance for generations. In Brazil, the six cities with the highest coronavirus exposure are all on the Amazon River, according to an expansive new study from Brazilian researchers that measured antibodies in the population.”

EurekAlert: Concordian co-leads effort to see future of AI from an Indigenous perspective

EurekAlert: Concordian co-leads effort to see future of AI from an Indigenous perspective. “The 205-page [Indigenous Protocol and Artificial Intelligence Position Paper] is a collection of scholarly articles, essays, short stories, poems and tech prototypes, each offering a unique perspective on what AI means and offers to Indigenous peoples. Topics are as diverse as the workshops’ participants: one essay asks us to imagine ways to design AI that align with Indigenous values and ethics. Another questions data sovereignty and appropriation. Others ask how AI can be incorporated into and become a part of creation stories or how blockchain technology combined with AI can be used to manage Indigenous communities’ business affairs.”

Weaving Indigenous knowledge with scientific research: A balanced approach (Phys .org)

Phys .org: Weaving Indigenous knowledge with scientific research: A balanced approach. “Indigenous knowledge, including oral histories, mythologies, place names and classification schemes, can span many generations, preserving information that has helped native communities adapt to natural hazards as well as gradually changing conditions. Although Western scientists have historically deemed such information unreliable, during the past decade there has been increasing recognition of the advantages of bicultural approaches to scientific research, including demonstration of reliability.”

SBS News: Deaths in custody database reinvigorates calls for justice system overhaul

SBS News: Deaths in custody database reinvigorates calls for justice system overhaul. “Researchers behind a national database of Australian deaths in custody over the past three decades say they hope it shines a light on the lives lost and the need for reform. Nearly 800 coroners’ reports can now be searched in the one place, including the 437 Aboriginal deaths in custody since 1991.”

Library and Archives Canada Blog: Archives as resources for revitalizing First Nations languages

Library and Archives Canada Blog: Archives as resources for revitalizing First Nations languages. “Since colonial contact, government policies have caused the displacement and separation of our people from their families, communities, lands and languages. Attempts at assimilation, such as the establishment of residential schools and the ongoing Millennium Scoop, have distanced multiple generations from their languages and cultures. Canada recognizes only English and French as official languages. First Nations communities have therefore taken leadership in ensuring that their languages are maintained, relearned and passed down. The decline in the natural inheritance of language through kinship has led to the rise of language-preservation and language-revitalization projects.”

KVAL: UO museum works to digitize collection of fragile Native American baskets

KVAL: UO museum works to digitize collection of fragile Native American baskets. “Close up and through a camera – that’s what’s happening quietly behind the scenes at the University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History….Teams from the museum are digitizing the UO’s entire collection of historic Native American baskets, a project made possible through grants from the State Heritage Commission and other sources.” There’s a video news story that goes with this — about two and a half minutes — that’s worth watching.

My Yellowknife Now: Library and Archives Canada funds projects to help preserve Indigenous culture and language recordings

My Yellowknife Now: Library and Archives Canada funds projects to help preserve Indigenous culture and language recordings. “Library and Archives Canada (LAC) is providing $2.3 million to support 31 projects by First Nations, Inuit and Métis Nation organizations. As part of the Government of Canada’s reconciliation efforts, LAC is supporting Indigenous communities as they seek to preserve and make accessible their existing audio and video heritage for future generations.”

South Dakota State University: SDSU Extension Releases Dakota and Lakota Traditional Games Resource Guide

South Dakota State University: SDSU Extension Releases Dakota and Lakota Traditional Games Resource Guide. “SDSU Extension recently released a resource guide on traditional Dakota and Lakota games. The free, downloadable guide contains six traditional Dakota games and six traditional Lakota games, including photos, instructions on how to play and how to craft the game pieces.” Not the largest resource I’ve ever mentioned, but not the kind of resource I see very often, either…