Infected after 5 minutes, from 20 feet away: South Korea study shows coronavirus’ spread indoors (Los Angeles Times)

Los Angeles Times: Infected after 5 minutes, from 20 feet away: South Korea study shows coronavirus’ spread indoors. “Dr. Lee Ju-hyung has largely avoided restaurants in recent months, but on the few occasions he’s dined out, he’s developed a strange, if sensible, habit: whipping out a small anemometer to check the airflow. It’s a precaution he has been taking since a June experiment in which he and colleagues re-created the conditions at a restaurant in Jeonju, a city in southwestern South Korea, where diners contracted the coronavirus from an out-of-town visitor. Among them was a high school student who became infected after five minutes of exposure from more than 20 feet away.”

Bloomberg BusinessWeek: To Make a Building Healthier, Stop Sanitizing Everything

Bloomberg BusinessWeek: To Make a Building Healthier, Stop Sanitizing Everything. “In the Western world, humans spend 90% of their time indoors. The average American spends even more than that—93%—inside buildings or cars. For years scientists have sounded the alarm that our disconnect from the outdoors is linked to a host of chronic health problems, including allergies, asthma, depression, irritable bowel syndrome, and obesity. More recently, experts in various fields have begun studying why buildings, even those designed to be as germ-free as possible, are vectors for disease, not the least Covid-19.”

The Atlantic: How to Tell If Socializing Indoors Is Safe

The Atlantic: How to Tell If Socializing Indoors Is Safe. “Beyond ‘stay at home’ and ‘it’s okay to go out now,’ government officials aren’t explaining the relative risks clearly and widely enough for everyone to understand. Ever since states publicized their ‘reopenings,’ some people have seen unrelated people only from a six-foot distance and outside. Others are throwing indoor weddings. Often, these people live in the same city. Given this information vacuum, researchers like [Dr. Megan] Ranney and some public-health workers have launched their own efforts to help people decide what types of social activities are safe, based on where they live.”

Mother Jones: The Gas Industry Is Paying Instagram Influencers to Gush Over Gas Stoves

Mother Jones: The Gas Industry Is Paying Instagram Influencers to Gush Over Gas Stoves. “The gas cooking Insta–trend is no accident. It’s the result of a carefully orchestrated campaign dreamed up by marketers for representatives with the American Gas Association and American Public Gas Association, two trade groups that draw their funding from a mix of investor- and publicly owned utilities. Since at least 2018, social media and wellness personalities have been hired to post more than 100 posts extolling the virtues of their stoves in sponsored posts. Documents from the fossil fuel watchdog Climate Investigations Center show that another trade group, the American Public Gas Association, intends to spend another $300,000 on its millennial-centric ‘Natural Gas Genius’ campaign in 2020.”

Berkeley Lab: New Research Launched on Airborne Virus Transmission in Buildings

Berkeley Lab: New Research Launched on Airborne Virus Transmission in Buildings. “As society prepares to reopen indoor spaces and ease back into some sense of normalcy during the COVID-19 pandemic, a team of researchers at the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) is launching a study of the risk of airborne transmission of viruses within buildings and how to mitigate those risks.”