Purdue University: Dashboard shows ‘Achilles’ heel’ of food supply chain

Purdue University: Dashboard shows ‘Achilles’ heel’ of food supply chain. “[Jayson] Lusk, who leads Purdue’s Center for Food Demand Analysis and Sustainability, and Ahmad Zia Wahdat, a postdoctoral research associate at the center, developed an interactive dashboard to share their findings. A working paper posted on SSRN details their work. The dashboard teases out the inputs needed for different food industries, provides the share of total cost of upstream inputs and labor, and evaluates the risk of an industry based on a diversity score. The score ranges from a value of zero to one, with higher scores indicating less vulnerability.”

From machine parts to dumbbells: How a cast iron foundry responded to the pandemic (CNET)

CNET: From machine parts to dumbbells: How a cast iron foundry responded to the pandemic. “Goldens’ Cast Iron didn’t always make workout equipment. Founded by two brothers in Columbus, Georgia, in 1882, the company spent its first century building things like machine parts, sugarcane syrup kettles and, during World War II, steering engines for Liberty ships. It was a lot of important stuff, though nothing you were likely to find in your home. It took COVID-19 to change that.”

Southeast Chicago Archive and Storytelling Project

Spotted in my Google Alerts: Southeast Chicago Archive and Storytelling Project . From the front page: “History is often told from the viewpoint of the powerful. For most of us, however, history is bound up with the everyday objects we save and the stories we tell that give them meaning. The Southeast Chicago Archive and Storytelling Project highlights a remarkable collection of objects, gathered and preserved by residents of a steel mill community as its industrial base was collapsing. Can looking more closely at what has been saved from the past spark conversations and make connections across generations, groups, and geographic regions? Can it help us better understand the present and reimagine the future?”

Radio Bulgaria: Digital archive to store history of Bulgaria’s industrial heritage

Radio Bulgaria: Digital archive to store history of Bulgaria’s industrial heritage. “Factories, railway facilities, bridges, slaughterhouses, showing the history of rapid industrial development in the first decades of the 20th century, are often left to destruction these days or they ‘accidentally’ burn down. To preserve the story of these valuable architectural specimens, a team of historians has decided to develop a digital archive and a mobile application dedicated to the industrial heritage of Bulgaria.”

Global Mining Review: Public database of mine tailings dams aims to prevent disasters

Global Mining Review: Public database of mine tailings dams aims to prevent disasters. “The release of the Global Tailings Portal coincides with the one-year anniversary of the tailings dam collapse in Brumadinho, Brazil, which killed 270 people. After that disaster, a group of institutional investors led by the Church of England Pensions Board asked 726 of the world’s largest mining companies to disclose details about their tailings dams. Many of the companies complied, and the information they released has been incorporated into the database.” I didn’t know what mine tailings are. Apparently they’re are basically mining waste.

The Local, Germany: New website shows how German industry used Auschwitz prisoners as slaves

The Local, Germany: New website shows how German industry used Auschwitz prisoners as slaves. “The site pulls together more than a decade of research on some 45 sub-camps or ‘kommandos’ located on the periphery of the most notorious site of the Nazi Holocaust. Based on first-hand accounts and research in the archives of the Auschwitz-Birkenau museum and others, the site contains more than 3,500 photos, documents and maps. It tells the story of each sub-camp, including lists of the survivors and SS guards and information about their personal stories. The site also lists the industrial organisations implicated in exploiting prisoners at the camps.”

Carnegie Mellon University: Archives Digitize Decades of Mellon Institute Records

Carnegie Mellon University: Archives Digitize Decades of Mellon Institute Records. “Carnegie Mellon’s University Libraries have organized and preserved 347 boxes of records from the Mellon Institute of Industrial Research, one of the nation’s premier independent research centers, making the records more widely discoverable and available to researchers…. Since its inception in 1913, the Mellon Institute engaged the brightest scientific minds of its time to develop, test, and refine new chemical, biological, and materials science innovations on behalf of its corporate partners. In the process, the institute defined the profession of sponsored research, spun off successful companies such as the Dow Corning and Union Carbide corporations, and developed industry-changing technologies.”

Harvard Gazette: New interactive website helps chart paths for economic growth

Harvard Gazette: New interactive website helps chart paths for economic growth. “The Growth Lab, a program of the Center for International Development (CID) at Harvard Kennedy School, has just launched its Country Profiles portal, an interactive website that boils down 6,000 data points into a handful of interactive graphs. The algorithms built into the program generate suggested growth strategies and identify economic opportunities for each of the 130 profiled countries.”

Arab News: Ministry of Culture launches first national competition to document Saudi industrial heritage

Arab News: Ministry of Culture launches first national competition to document Saudi industrial heritage. “The Ministry of Culture launched the first day of the national competition to document the Kingdom’s industrial heritage on Sunday July 14. The competition aims to establish the first national database for all industrial sites that fall under this category, with the participation of Saudis and residents from all social segments.”

Shropshire Star: Shropshire photos preserved through Express & Star archive project go live on new website

Shropshire Star: Shropshire photos preserved through Express & Star archive project go live on new website. “About 3,000 images of the history of the industrial past of the Black Country and its surrounding areas have been preserved for future generations… The Express & Star Photographic Collection partnership received a grant from the National Lottery Heritage Fund to produce a website and digitise photographs dating back over the past century.” My knowledge of England’s geography is woeful but the BBC gave me an overview of some opinions on what makes the “Black Country” of England. (like many geographical areas, there are disagreements.)