MIT Technology Review: What researchers learned from deliberately giving people covid

MIT Technology Review: What researchers learned from deliberately giving people covid. “The 36 volunteers, all aged 18 to 30, were exposed to a low dose of the original SARS-CoV-2 virus in the nose, the equivalent of the amount found in just a single drop of nasal fluid. Half the participants developed covid symptoms; they became infectious within just two days, with levels of infectious virus peaking at five days. It has previously been estimated that the time from exposure to first symptoms was about five days. Participants in the study remained infectious for an average of nine days and still had detectable levels of virus in their nose 12 days after initial exposure.”

University of Exeter: One in ten people may still be infectious for COVID after ten days, new research indicates

University of Exeter: One in ten people may still be infectious for COVID after ten days, new research indicates. “One in 10 people may have clinically relevant levels of potentially infectious SARS-CoV-2 past the 10 day quarantine period, according to new research. The study, led by the University of Exeter and funded by Animal Free Research UK, used a newly adapted test which can detect whether the virus was potentially still active.”

Ars Technica: As COVID cases rise, so do hospital-related infections

Ars Technica: As COVID cases rise, so do hospital-related infections. “Stories of patients unable to get into hospitals—stuck in waiting rooms, lingering in ambulances, life-flighted to other states where there might be an open bed—have been an awful constant during this hot-spot summer. Overcrowding is an obvious threat to their health. But it poses a more subtle threat to already-admitted patients: it creates conditions and demands on hospital staff that allow dangerous infections to spread. Now, a new study shows how real that threat is, based on infection statistics from hospitals that battled the first waves of COVID in 2020.”

MobiHealthNews: FDA, NIH’s newest app asks clinicians to log case data when treating difficult infections

MobiHealthNews: FDA, NIH’s newest app asks clinicians to log case data when treating difficult infections. “The FDA and National Institutes of Health are tapping the clinical community and a newly launched mobile platform in its search for novel infectious disease interventions. Called CURE ID, the online data repository will allow clinicians to report instances in which existing FDA-approved drugs are used to successfully treat infections.”

Seattle Times: Seattle doctors, scientists fight superbugs that could kill millions

Seattle Times: Seattle doctors, scientists fight superbugs that could kill millions. “Catching an ear infection is uncomfortable enough, but imagine if the antibiotics a doctor prescribed didn’t work. It’s a problem that at least 2 million people in the U.S. face every year, when they catch infections that are resistant to antibiotics, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That makes the phenomenon known as antimicrobial resistance, or AMR, ‘one of the biggest public health challenges of our time,’ the agency said. AMR may cause 10 million deaths globally by 2050, based on rising drug resistance for six pathogens, according to a report commissioned by the British government in 2016.”

Revitalizing the drug pipeline: AntibioticDB, an open access database to aid antibacterial research and development (Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy)

Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy: Revitalizing the drug pipeline: AntibioticDB, an open access database to aid antibacterial research and development. “The current state of antibiotic discovery, research and development is insufficient to respond to the need for new treatments for drug-resistant bacterial infections. The process has changed over the last decade, with most new agents that are in Phases 1–3, or recently approved, having been discovered in small- and medium-sized enterprises or academia. These agents have then been licensed or sold to large companies for further development with the goal of taking them to market. However, early drug discovery and development, including the possibility of developing previously discontinued agents, would benefit from a database of antibacterial compounds for scrutiny by the developers. This article describes the first free, open-access searchable database of antibacterial compounds, including discontinued agents, drugs under pre-clinical development and those in clinical trials: AntibioticDB.” The article is free.