MobiHealthNews: FDA, NIH’s newest app asks clinicians to log case data when treating difficult infections

MobiHealthNews: FDA, NIH’s newest app asks clinicians to log case data when treating difficult infections. “The FDA and National Institutes of Health are tapping the clinical community and a newly launched mobile platform in its search for novel infectious disease interventions. Called CURE ID, the online data repository will allow clinicians to report instances in which existing FDA-approved drugs are used to successfully treat infections.”

Seattle Times: Seattle doctors, scientists fight superbugs that could kill millions

Seattle Times: Seattle doctors, scientists fight superbugs that could kill millions. “Catching an ear infection is uncomfortable enough, but imagine if the antibiotics a doctor prescribed didn’t work. It’s a problem that at least 2 million people in the U.S. face every year, when they catch infections that are resistant to antibiotics, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That makes the phenomenon known as antimicrobial resistance, or AMR, ‘one of the biggest public health challenges of our time,’ the agency said. AMR may cause 10 million deaths globally by 2050, based on rising drug resistance for six pathogens, according to a report commissioned by the British government in 2016.”

Revitalizing the drug pipeline: AntibioticDB, an open access database to aid antibacterial research and development (Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy)

Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy: Revitalizing the drug pipeline: AntibioticDB, an open access database to aid antibacterial research and development. “The current state of antibiotic discovery, research and development is insufficient to respond to the need for new treatments for drug-resistant bacterial infections. The process has changed over the last decade, with most new agents that are in Phases 1–3, or recently approved, having been discovered in small- and medium-sized enterprises or academia. These agents have then been licensed or sold to large companies for further development with the goal of taking them to market. However, early drug discovery and development, including the possibility of developing previously discontinued agents, would benefit from a database of antibacterial compounds for scrutiny by the developers. This article describes the first free, open-access searchable database of antibacterial compounds, including discontinued agents, drugs under pre-clinical development and those in clinical trials: AntibioticDB.” The article is free.