Made In Chelsea’s Andy Jordan: Being an influencer made me ‘a puppet’ (BBC)

BBC: Made In Chelsea’s Andy Jordan: Being an influencer made me ‘a puppet’. “He was making money, but the constant selling took its toll on Andy. At the same time, he was starring in Made In Chelsea, a scripted show made to look like reality TV. ‘You just become a puppet… you’re literally like the packaging,’ he says. ‘I’d lost who I was because everything was directed by someone else.'”

Observer: Debunking the Myth of ‘Blogger Boyfriends’ and ‘Instagram Husbands’

Observer: Debunking the Myth of ‘Blogger Boyfriends’ and ‘Instagram Husbands’. “Toronto-based influencer Allegra Shaw has 234K followers on Instagram and 863K subscribers on YouTube. She also co-runs Uncle Studios, a sustainable clothing line. Her high-fashion style features occasional nods to the ‘influencer’ uniform (think: tiny sunglasses and biker shorts), but it’s her un-edited vlogs that set her apart from the rest. In them, she provides her viewers with an intimate look at the art of influencing and showcases her boyfriend’s role, too.”

Chronicle of Higher Education: How to Get Students to Fill Out the Fafsa? Enlist Instagram Influencers

Chronicle of Higher Education: How to Get Students to Fill Out the Fafsa? Enlist Instagram Influencers. “Instagram influencers, or people who have a bevy of followers and manicured photos on the social-media website, will try to sell you weight-loss tea, prepared-meal kits, or subscription boxes of dog treats. Now, a select few influencers are hawking the Free Application for Federal Student Aid form.”

Wired: Child Stars Don’t Need Hollywood. They Have YouTube

Wired: Child Stars Don’t Need Hollywood. They Have YouTube. “In recent years, hundreds of kids have risen to bankable internet stardom on Instagram and YouTube. Marketers, ever the wordsmiths, have dubbed them ‘kidfluencers.’ They’re the child stars of the social media age, tiny captains of industry with their own toy lines and cookbooks. On Instagram, families seem to go for a controlled-chaos aesthetic—a Kondo’d Jon & Kate Plus 8. On YouTube, it’s more like late-capitalist Blue’s Clues. And somehow, despite the brand deals and the creeps in the comments and the constant watchfulness of parents’ cameras and the general ickiness our society attaches to living the most innocent years of your life on a public stage, these kids seem all right.” Man, I hope so.

AdAge: Fake Followers Are Hard To Shake, According To New Report

AdAge: Fake Followers Are Hard To Shake, According To New Report . “Unilever’s effort to rid itself of influencers with fake followers hasn’t made much difference, at least for its Dove brand, according to a new report. And despite the industry’s concern about fakes, the report, from analytics firm Points North Group, says spending on influencers continues to snowball.”

BBC: Social media stars agree to declare when they post ads

BBC: Social media stars agree to declare when they post ads. “Sixteen social media stars including singers Ellie Goulding and Rita Ora, models Rosie Huntington-Whiteley and Alexa Chung, and vlogger Zoella have agreed to change how they post online. They will have to clearly state if they have been paid or received any gifts or loans of products they endorse.”

Advertising Age: 10 Influencers Under 10

Advertising Age: 10 Influencers Under 10. “Generation Alpha isn’t kidding around. A child influencer can earn, per post, $100 for every 1,000 followers, and a kid with 500,000 followers can earn $5,000 for a single image, Fast Company estimates. Seems like these 10 influencers are on their way to paying for college.”