Futurism: Oh No, Oil Companies Are Paying Social Media Influencers Now

Futurism: Oh No, Oil Companies Are Paying Social Media Influencers Now. “Surely, you may be telling yourself, surely no one is buying into an eco-friendly cross-country trip sponsored by big oil. But that’s exactly what’s happening, Earther reports. Just look at this disturbingly ironic post by lifestyle Cherrie Lynn Almonte that talks about the perils of climate change and how it threatens California’s iconic landscapes — right beneath a disclaimer that the post was paid for by Shell.”

EurekAlert: Social media influencing grows more precarious in digital age

EurekAlert: Social media influencing grows more precarious in digital age. “Influencing millions of people on social media and being paid handsomely is not as easy as it looks, according to new Cornell University research. Algorithm vagaries are just one of several challenges social media content creators face, according to study author Brooke Erin Duffy, associate professor of communication at Cornell.”

China org: Foreign social media influencers try livestream selling in Yiwu

China org: Foreign social media influencers try livestream selling in Yiwu. “Social media influencers from overseas tried their hands at livestream selling on Monday in Yiwu, Zhejiang province, as part of the ‘Daka China’ global communication event. After receiving basic training at the Yiwu Live Stream Industrial Park, the internet celebrities chose the products they wanted to promote and paired up to host their maiden livestreaming sales events.”

Rappler: Anti-vaxxers make up to $1.1 billion for social media companies

Rappler: Anti-vaxxers make up to $1.1 billion for social media companies. “The global anti-vaccination industry, including influencers and followers, generates up to $1.1 billion in annual revenue for social media giants, according to a damning new report published this week. Anti-vaccine content creates a vast amount of engagement for leading technology platforms, including Facebook and Instagram, with an estimated total social media audience of 62 million people. The arrangement works both ways, with the anti-vax industry earning up to $36million a year.”

Harper’s Magazine: The Anxiety of Influencers

Harper’s Magazine: The Anxiety of Influencers. “Also known as content houses or TikTok mansions, collab houses are grotesquely lavish abodes where teens and early twentysomethings live and work together, trying to achieve viral fame on a variety of media platforms. Sometime last spring, when most of us were making bread or watching videos of singing Italians, the houses began to proliferate in impressive if not mind-boggling numbers, to the point where it became difficult for a casual observer even to keep track of them.”

Platform launch: Qoruz launches India’s first comprehensive influencer search engine (The Tech Panda)

The Tech Panda: Platform launch: Qoruz launches India’s first comprehensive influencer search engine. “The search engine, termed Qoruz Search, gives access to India’s largest database of hundreds and thousands of influencers, including celebrities, macro, micro and nano influencers for free across Instagram, YouTube, Twitter, Facebook, and blogs. Advanced features like filters, detailed analytics, insights and campaign planning tools will be available for a small license fee.”

India Today: Social media influencers will now have to add labels for paid content, new guidelines out

India Today: Social media influencers will now have to add labels for paid content, new guidelines out. “The Advertising Standards Council of India (ASCI) has released new guidelines for social media influencers who upload content on various social media platforms like Instagram, Facebook, and YouTube. According to the new guidelines, influencers will now have to add a disclosure label to clarify if a post includes paid advertisements.”

RIP: The Uncanny Business of Dead Celebrity Endorsements on Social Media (TorrentFreak)

TorrentFreak: RIP: The Uncanny Business of Dead Celebrity Endorsements on Social Media. “The dead are more alive than ever. Thanks to social media and inherited ‘intellectual property rights,’ stars of the past enjoy digital immortality. Icons including Elvis, Marilyn Monroe, and John Lennon remain active on blue-checkmarked social media accounts that are often controlled by for-profit corporations, which don’t require a family tie to the deceased.”

Washington Post: Corporations are working with social media influencers to cancel-proof their racial justice initiatives

Washington Post: Corporations are working with social media influencers to cancel-proof their racial justice initiatives. “Advocating for racial allyship is not something corporate America has traditionally embraced. But the multiracial protests against police brutality last year prompted many companies to examine their role in combating systemic racism and pushing White Americans to reflect on their understanding of race and privilege — all while trying to increase market share. With every new well-meaning — or opportunistic, depending on the details — effort comes the potential for public and painful missteps.”

CNN: Social media platforms are going to war for online talent

CNN: Social media platforms are going to war for online talent. “When Katerina Horwitz started out as a social media influencer in 2016, she didn’t earn much money beyond a handful of sponsored posts. A few years later, Horwitz and her husband Yinon quit their day jobs, started a joint Instagram account and got creative with monetizing their 400,000 followers, including selling their own photo filters and building an app that offers editing templates for Instagram Stories. But recently they’ve found a simpler revenue stream: earning money directly from social media companies.”

Instagram-ready: Vietnamese influencer teaches art of posing (Agence France-Presse)

Agence France-Presse: Instagram-ready: Vietnamese influencer teaches art of posing. “How to smile, where to place a hand, which direction to face: young Vietnamese social media users are snapping up a popular influencer’s course on posing for the perfect photo. In communist Vietnam, where 70 percent of the population is under 35, the classes are particularly popular with young women. Instructor Pham Kieu Ly – who has hundreds of thousands of followers on Instagram and TikTok –set up the $130 course in Hanoi after women began asking her how to look their best in photos, largely for social media.”

The New York Times: How Do Influencers Get Jobs? It’s Changing

The New York Times: How Do Influencers Get Jobs? It’s Changing. “The business of influence is professionalizing. Content creators are signing to major talent agencies. In February, SAG-AFTRA, the largest union in the entertainment industry, expanded coverage to people who make sponsored content. And now, a new service wants to make it easier for creators to apply to work with brands, and for companies to hire them.”