Jersey Digs: As Construction Boom Continues, Social Media Influencers are Becoming Preservationists

So, so good, from a source new to me. Jersey Digs: As Construction Boom Continues, Social Media Influencers are Becoming Preservationists. “Most people know Keith Taillon as the Instagrammer that is trying to walk every block of Manhattan. Impressive — but that’s hardly the driving force behind his popular social media page. The Harlem resident is trying to salvage the history of his city before it is lost to the construction boom.”

Engadget: Google’s latest experimental app lets influencers host paid online events

Engadget: Google’s latest experimental app lets influencers host paid online events. “Area 120, Google’s internal startup incubator, wants to give YouTubers and other influencers a platform to host paid online events. Fundo, its new app, allows those individuals to set up internet meet and greets and workshops with their fans. It gives hosts full control over how much it costs to attend an event, allowing them to offer free tickets if they so choose.” When I put this into ResearchBuzz Firehose, I was startled to see that “Fundo” was already a tag. Turned out Variety wrote about this app just over a year ago.

Citizen Digital: Bloggers, social media users with huge following to be ‘monitored by the state’- Ugandan gov’t orders

Citizen Digital: Bloggers, social media users with huge following to be ‘monitored by the state’- Ugandan gov’t orders . “The Ugandan Communication Commission has asked social media users and bloggers with a large following to ‘register for monitoring by the state’. Those who fit the bill are required to have registered with the commission before October 5, 2020.”

New York Times: Are Influencers Responsible for the Behavior of Their Followers?

New York Times: Are Influencers Responsible for the Behavior of Their Followers?. “Nearly all of Chris’s videos follow the same format: a video loops to his right, he smiles, sometimes gives a thumbs up, then something happens in the video and his smile drops. The majority of Chris’s videos are reactions to anodyne moments. In one, his smile drops when a man slams a brick of tofu in his own face; in another it’s when cockroaches appear onscreen. Some of his videos, however, feature reactions to LGBTQ creators. He has a shocked expression when men put on skirts, when a man sucks on a straw, or when trans people reveal transformations over time.”

New York Times: An Influencer House Wouldn’t Stop Partying, So L.A. Cut Its Power

New York Times: An Influencer House Wouldn’t Stop Partying, So L.A. Cut Its Power. “The City of Los Angeles cut the power at a Hollywood Hills mansion rented by the TikTok stars Bryce Hall, Noah Beck and Blake Gray on [August 19] in response to parties held at the residence amid the coronavirus crisis.”

The New Times (Rwanda): How social media is influencing the rise of brand ambassadors

The New Times (Rwanda): How social media is influencing the rise of brand ambassadors. “Last week, Miss Rwanda 2020 Naomie Nishimwe, signed a contract that will see her become the brand ambassador for Itel Mobile Rwanda in the next twelve months. She joins a number of local celebrities helping different companies grow their sales by tapping into the presence on social media of different celebrities including musicians Bruce Melodie and The Ben, socialite Shadia Mbabazi a.k.a Shaddyboo, footballer Yves Kimenyi, media personality Luckman Nzeyimana and Miss Rwanda 2018 finalist Claudine Uwase Muyango, among many others.”

Yonhap: S. Korea to ban ‘backdoor online advertising’ on social media

Yonhap: S. Korea to ban ‘backdoor online advertising’ on social media. “South Korea’s antitrust regulator said Monday that it will ban social media influencers from promoting a new product or service on their online platforms without disclosing their business ties with corporate sponsors.”

Egypt: Egypt TikTok and Instagram stars pay heavy price for ‘indecency’

BBC: Egypt TikTok and Instagram stars pay heavy price for ‘indecency’. “‘We were left in utter shock. She did nothing wrong – my sister is not a criminal,’ says Rahma al-Adham, talking of her younger sibling, a social media influencer in Egypt. Mawada, a 22-year-old university student, was last month sentenced to two years in prison after being convicted of violating Egyptian family values. She was arrested in May after publishing videos on TikTok and Instagram where she lip-synced to famous songs and danced in fashionable clothes. The prosecutor found her videos indecent.”

Un-Adopted: YouTubers Myka and James Stauffer shared every step of their parenting journey. Except the last. (The Cut)

The Cut: Un-Adopted: YouTubers Myka and James Stauffer shared every step of their parenting journey. Except the last.. “According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, anywhere from one percent to 5 percent of the more than 100,000 adoptions in the U.S. each year are legally terminated in what’s called a ‘dissolution’ — making the Stauffers’ decision to relinquish custody rare but not unheard of. Had they not shared Huxley’s adoption with the world, building an audience from videos about everything from his medical diagnoses to his food anxiety, they would be dealing with a private family tragedy rather than a public scandal. Instead, the Stauffers have been held up as examples of what is wrong with both influencer and adoption culture — and what can happen when a child is caught at the intersection.”

New York Times: Why Influencers Won’t Stop Partying Anytime Soon

New York Times: Why Influencers Won’t Stop Partying Anytime Soon. “California, where coronavirus cases remained low in the first few months of the pandemic, has experienced a summer outbreak. Last week it became the first state to report half a million cases, according to a database maintained by The New York Times, and the infection rate has been especially high in Los Angeles County. Still, many of its young residents keep partying.”

Mukbang: Why is China clamping down on eating influencers? (BBC)

BBC: Mukbang: Why is China clamping down on eating influencers?. “For some, the idea of watching and hearing someone eat piles of food on camera is not appealing. But the trend, started about 10 years ago, has become extremely popular in Asia. Now, though, the Chinese government is cracking down on the videos, which soon may be banned altogether in the country.”

New York Times: Nordstrom Uses Influencers to Promote Safety and Draw Anxious Shoppers

New York Times: Nordstrom Uses Influencers to Promote Safety and Draw Anxious Shoppers. “Even before the coronavirus pandemic, retailers were struggling to get more people into stores. Now foot traffic to malls, including outdoor shopping centers, is down about 30 percent from last year, according to aggregated data from the location analysis company Cuebiq, which tracks about 15 million cellphone users nationwide daily. It was down as much as 57 percent earlier this year, as widespread shutdowns essentially ended in-person shopping in many areas of the country. By hiring influencers to highlight safety measures, retailers, especially those that sell apparel and other discretionary goods, are trying to restore a sense of normalcy to activities like in-store shopping that were utterly banal six months ago but now may seem dangerous to many customers.”

Middle East Monitor: Egypt releases social media influencer jailed for ‘immoral videos’

Middle East Monitor: Egypt releases social media influencer jailed for ‘immoral videos’. “TikTok influencer Manar Samy has been released from Egyptian jail on a bail of 20,000 Egyptian pounds ($1,253) after being arrested earlier this month for posting ‘immoral videos’. Samy was sentenced to three years imprisonment earlier this month on charges of “inciting debauchery, immorality and stirring up instincts” through her online videos, according to a prosecution statement.”

The Scotsman: Influencer accused of £200m plot to defraud Edinburgh firm

The Scotsman: Influencer accused of £200m plot to defraud Edinburgh firm. “Ramon Abbas, who has attracted millions of followers on the social media network by sharing images of his lavish lifestyle, is alleged to have conspired to launder hundreds of millions of pounds from frauds known as Business Email Compromise (BEC) and other scams.”

The Verge: Black influencers are underpaid, and a new Instagram account is proving it

The Verge: Black influencers are underpaid, and a new Instagram account is proving it. “Mikai McDermott first realized how underpaid she was while at her first photoshoot. McDermott, then a 19-year-old influencer and the only Black model on set, asked for £100 for the day, not knowing what she should have been asking for. During a break, she turned to a white model and asked how much she was making. The answer shocked her. The woman said she was making £1,000 total for the day — 10 times more.”