HuffPost: Trump Insiders Are Quietly Paying Teen Memers For Posts

HuffPost: Trump Insiders Are Quietly Paying Teen Memers For Posts. “In the fever swamps of Instagram, a network of right-wing meme accounts run by teenage boys and young men has erupted into an advertising powerhouse reaching millions. These memers — who regularly post far-right conspiracy theories, anti-vaccine propaganda and other incendiary clickbait — first caught the attention of obscure brands selling cheap MAGA merch, who started paying them to display ads to their rapidly growing conservative audiences. The money wasn’t great, as a few memers told HuffPost last summer, but it still felt like a big deal to watch their Instagram pages blossom into mini businesses. Little did they know, members of Donald Trump’s inner circle would soon come knocking.”

Wired: In Kenya, Influencers Are Hired to Spread Disinformation

Wired: In Kenya, Influencers Are Hired to Spread Disinformation. “ON MAY 18 of this year, the insidious hashtag #AnarchistJudges appeared on Kenyan Twitter timelines. Apparently driven by a number of faceless bots, and retweeted by a series of sock puppet accounts, the deluge of tweets cast suspicion on both the competence and integrity of senior High Court of Kenya judges that had just shot down the Constitutional Amendments Bill of 2021. Many falsely claimed the judges were involved in narcotics dealings, bribery, and political partisanship. It quickly became one of the country’s top trending topics. Such malicious, coordinated disinformation attacks are rapidly growing in Kenya, my Mozilla Foundation colleague Brian Obilo and I have found in a new investigation.”

Nation’s Restaurant News: Chipotle Mexican Grill launches new ‘Creator Class’ of TikTok infuencers

Nation’s Restaurant News: Chipotle Mexican Grill launches new ‘Creator Class’ of TikTok infuencers. “Officials on Thursday announced 14 founding members. One more superfan will have the opportunity to join the class by making a Chipotle-themed TikTok video using #chipotlecreator and #entry between Sept. 9-13. Company officials will choose the top three videos and members of the creator class will select the 15thmember.”

AP: Social media’s 70-up ‘grandfluencers’ debunking aging myths

AP: Social media’s 70-up ‘grandfluencers’ debunking aging myths. “Joan MacDonald’s health was in shambles at age 71. She was overweight and on numerous medications with high cholesterol, rising blood pressure and kidney trouble. Her daughter, a fitness coach, warned that she’d wind up an invalid if she didn’t turn things around. She did, hitting the gym for the first time and learning to balance her diet with the help of a brand new tool, an iPhone. Now 75, MacDonald is a hype beast for health with a bodybuilder’s physique and 1.4 million loyal followers on Instagram.”

Wall Street Journal: The Social-Media Stars Who Move Markets

Wall Street Journal: The Social-Media Stars Who Move Markets. “Total users at the six top online brokerages, which are used mainly by individual investors, topped 100 million in 2021. At Robinhood Financial LLC, the investing app popular among younger investors, accounts have grown explosively, from 7.2 million in March of 2020 to 18 million a year later, according to company financial filings. Along with the rise of commission-free online trading has come demand for advice at the lowest price in the most accessible place: free, and online. Now, a new generation of Jim Cramers has risen up on social media with massive followings as guides to these market newbies.”

Influencers in the boxing ring: Are they the new fighters? (WTKR)

WTKR: Influencers in the boxing ring: Are they the new fighters?. “For a number of social media influencers, the main event is in the ring. Controversial YouTuber Logan Paul — known for 20 million-plus subscribers — fought retired boxing legend Floyd Mayweather Jr. in an exhibition match. His brother, also an internet celebrity, is set to fight an MMA fighter in the next few days.”

The Verge: The Rise Of The TikTok Tour Guide

The Verge: The Rise Of The TikTok Tour Guide. “TikTok tour guides like [Jack] Gillespie now seem to exist in every major city, introducing viewers to trendy new shops and restaurants, often in a minute or less. You can get recommendations for soju margaritas in Manhattan, crystal shops in Los Angeles, or burgers in Boston. These accounts can be great ways to learn about new locations and a boon for local businesses that suddenly see lines out the door. But they also come with hidden limitations, with influencers gravitating toward newer, hipper businesses — and often ones that are willing to compensate them for the chance to go viral.”

CNN: China now wants to tell influencers how to speak and dress when live-streaming

CNN: China now wants to tell influencers how to speak and dress when live-streaming. “The Chinese Ministry of Commerce on Wednesday outlined proposals for an ‘industry standard’ for live-streamers who market products on online shopping platforms. The rules include details about how hosts on such shows should dress or speak in front of the camera, as well as guidelines for how platforms should allow consumers to provide reviews for hosts or the products that they market. Those reviews should also be made public, the ministry said.

Mashable: Meet TikTok’s Spotify influencers

Mashable: Meet TikTok’s Spotify influencers. “The new iteration of music bloggers is TikTokkers with wildly popular Spotify playlists. Some TikTokkers have gained popularity from sharing their musical tastes in videos based around their unique or relatable Spotify playlists. These users have thousands of followers on both TikTok and Spotify, and the music industry is taking notice of their influence.”

Women Love Tech: The Power of TikTok Skinfluencers

Women Love Tech: The Power of TikTok Skinfluencers. “While these beauty influencers appear on all social platforms, TikTok is the platform of choice because it allows them to produce short, unfiltered videos which can go viral quickly that talk about skincare routines and what products they recommend. Traackr data revealed that TikTok influencer posts about skincare have increased by 16% when comparing the first half of 2020 to the first half of 2021.”

Social media fraud: The influencers promoting criminal scams (BBC)

BBC: Social media fraud: The influencers promoting criminal scams. “On social media, there’s a new type of influencer. But instead of promoting clothing lines and lifestyle products, they promote fraud. They flash stacks of cash, hide their faces, and some even lure new recruits by selling guides on committing fraud. You’d think these scammers and their illegal products would be hard to find, and once upon a time, they were, hidden in the shadows of the dark web. But not any more.”