ZDNet: Social media and influencers still dominate our online shopping habits

ZDNet: Social media and influencers still dominate our online shopping habits. “Online shopping will surge in popularity as we hunker down to ride out the COVID-19 pandemic by staying indoors. But we are influenced by others far more that we would like to admit. Redwood City-based social commerce platform Poshmark recently released its 2020:the year of social shopping report. It gained insights from 8,573 shoppers across the US and Canada, and Poshmark’s community of 60 million users.”

Tubefilters: Despite Some Naysayers, Influencer Marketing Set For Big Growth In 2020

Tubefilter: Despite Some Naysayers, Influencer Marketing Set For Big Growth In 2020. “A new report from Influencer Marketing Hub and CreatorIQ says the influencer marketing industry is set to grow to approximately $9.7 billion in 2020. Despite ongoing criticism and media coverage questioning its efficacy, this form of marketing is still incredibly popular: 91% of the 4,000 brands, marketing agencies, and industry professionals surveyed said using influencers is an effective marketing tool, the study reveals. Not only that, but 66% of those surveyed plan to increase influencer marketing budgets over the next year.”

Wired: A Brief History of Instagram’s Trouble With ‘Weight-Loss Tea’

Wired: A Brief History of Instagram’s Trouble With ‘Weight-Loss Tea’. “Do you want a lithe, toned body that absolutely does not take multiple photo-editing apps to achieve? Do you want to be a person whose hair and makeup look red-carpet-ready immediately after leaving the gym? Do you want to eat only photogenic smoothie bowls and be utterly unfazed by the fact that they are cold yogurt soup? Try this tea! The 30-Day Detox Starter Pack is now only $85—just use my promo code below. Oh, by the way: #ad.”

CNN: In the overlooked world of LinkedIn influencers, a plumber finds a following

CNN: In the overlooked world of LinkedIn influencers, a plumber finds a following. “At Texas Green Plumbing, a residential plumbing company in Dallas, the setup resembles a traditional workplace: a reception area, several offices and a training space. But one room has been transformed into a home-made studio decked out with a microphone, video camera, lights and a backdrop that features shelves held up by pipes. That’s where Roger Wakefield, a 56-year-old plumber and owner of the company, spends half of each week filming advice and how-to videos — with the help of a hired videographer — to post to his thousands of followers on LinkedIn, as well as other social media channels.”

Vox: Most Americans are not prepared for a disaster. Now survival kits are all over Instagram.

Vox: Most Americans are not prepared for a disaster. Now survival kits are all over Instagram.. “It was a bit odd to see the Kardashians pivot from pushing detox tea to preaching the preparedness gospel, but they weren’t the only influencers lining up behind the idea. Popular accounts, including those of Olivia Culpo, Nyle DiMarco, Comments by Celebs, Haylie Duff, WeWoreWhat, Makeup by Mario, and not one but two Real Housewives of New Jersey, posted Stories or photos featuring their own orange gear, part of a new line of preparedness kits called Judy.”

Ubergizmo: Top TikTok Stars Could Earn As Much As $1 Million Per Post

Ubergizmo: Top TikTok Stars Could Earn As Much As $1 Million Per Post. “Remember back in the day when bloggers could earn a ton of money for sponsored posts? This later moved on to social media platforms, where those who were particularly popular on platforms like Instagram could also earn a lot of money, but now it looks like we’re moving on to a new platform: TikTok.”

Ars Technica: Companies are stealing influencers’ faces

Ars Technica: Companies are stealing influencers’ faces. “The first time Lucy Kyselica’s face was stolen, it turned up in the window of a beauty salon in small-town America. Kyselica is a Dutch beauty YouTuber who mostly makes videos about historical hairdos, but she had also made a video showing her subscribers how to thread their own eyebrows. The salon took a screengrab from that video, enlarged it to poster size, and used it to advertise their eyebrow threading services.”