Phys .org: Pandemic spawns ‘infodemic’ in scientific literature

Phys .org: Pandemic spawns ‘infodemic’ in scientific literature. “The science community has responded to the COVID-19 pandemic with such a flurry of research studies that it is hard for anyone to digest them all, underscoring a long-standing need to make scientific publication more accessible, transparent and accountable, two artificial intelligence experts assert in a data science journal.”

US officials: Russia behind spread of virus disinformation (AP)

AP: US officials: Russia behind spread of virus disinformation. “Russian intelligence services are using a trio of English-language websites to spread disinformation about the coronavirus pandemic, seeking to exploit a crisis that America is struggling to contain ahead of the presidential election in November, U.S. officials said Tuesday.”

MIT Technology Review: It’s too late to stop QAnon with fact checks and account bans

MIT Technology Review: It’s too late to stop QAnon with fact checks and account bans. “Researchers have known for years that different platforms play different roles in coordinated campaigns. People will coordinate in a chat app, message board, or private Facebook group, target their messages (including harassment and abuse) on Twitter, and host videos about the entire thing on YouTube. In this information ecosystem, Twitter functions more like a marketing campaign for QAnon: content is created to be seen and interacted with by outsiders. Meanwhile, Facebook is a powerhouse for coordination, especially in closed groups.”

Poynter: Fact-checkers fighting the COVID-19 infodemic drew a surge in readers

Poynter: Fact-checkers fighting the COVID-19 infodemic drew a surge in readers. “Fact-checkers across the globe responded to the COVID-19 pandemic with dramatic increases in their fact-checks, which drew unprecedented audiences to their sites, an International Fact-Checking Network survey shows. Sixteen fact-checking organizations from 15 countries responded to a survey about their performances designed to measure the impact of COVID-19 on the work of the fact-checking community from March 2019 to March 2020.”

New York Times: How the ‘Plandemic’ Movie and Its Falsehoods Spread Widely Online

New York Times: How the ‘Plandemic’ Movie and Its Falsehoods Spread Widely Online. “Just over a week after ‘Plandemic’ was released, it had been viewed more than eight million times on YouTube, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, and had generated countless other posts. The New York Times focused on the video’s spread on Facebook using data from CrowdTangle, a tool to analyze interactions across the social network. (YouTube and Twitter do not make their data as readily available.) The ascent of ‘Plandemic’ was largely powered by Facebook groups and pages that shared the YouTube link.”

Financial Times: Twitter failing to curb misinformation ‘superspreaders’, report warns

Financial Times: Twitter failing to curb misinformation ‘superspreaders’, report warns. “Twitter is failing to rein in ‘superspreaders’ of coronavirus misinformation on its platform, according to research detailing dozens of posts shared by high-profile accounts apparently flouting the social media group’s rules.”

MediaMatters: A coronavirus conspiracy theory film attacking vaccines has racked up million of views and engagements on YouTube and Facebook

MediaMatters: A coronavirus conspiracy theory film attacking vaccines has racked up million of views and engagements on YouTube and Facebook. “A film featuring a known anti-vaxxer pushing conspiracy theories and false claims about the novel coronavirus, including attacking vaccines, has racked up more than 9 million views on YouTube. Additionally, the video and its reuploads have tallied more than 16 million Facebook engagements. The spread of the film — called ‘Plandemic’ — through reuploads on YouTube shows the platform’s continuing issues with enforcing its policies against coronavirus misinformation during this public health crisis.”

Coconuts Bali: On social media, Indonesians fight back against dangerous COVID-19 conspiracy theories

Coconuts Bali: On social media, Indonesians fight back against dangerous COVID-19 conspiracy theories. “The COVID-19 pandemic has created a fertile ground for conspiracy theories to flourish, so much so that we’re seeing well-known figures here in Indonesia taking it upon themselves to echo these questionable ideas on their massive platforms. While the current state of our economy and society may in turn encourage these conspiracy beliefs, some Indonesians are not shying away from using social media to fight back against the dangerous infodemic.”

How to fight the COVID-19 infodemic: lessons from 3 Asian countries (World Economic Forum)

World Economic Forum: How to fight the COVID-19 infodemic: lessons from 3 Asian countries. “What makes the current pandemic more dangerous than any before is that the spread of rumours and false information on the internet is even faster than that of the coronavirus itself. Sylvie Briand, director of the WHO’s Infectious Hazard Management department, could not have better emphasized the need for governments to battle this parallel yet more vicious outbreak – that of the ‘infodemic’, or information epidemic.”

CNN: How health officials and social media are teaming up to fight the coronavirus ‘infodemic’

CNN: How health officials and social media are teaming up to fight the coronavirus ‘infodemic’. “As health officials in a growing number of countries fight to slow the spread of the novel coronavirus, they’re also working to stem a secondary issue that the World Health Organization is calling an ‘infodemic.'”