‘How to steal a Russian tank’: The extraordinary resistance tips the Ukrainian government is giving civilians (iNews)

iNews: ‘How to steal a Russian tank’: The extraordinary resistance tips the Ukrainian government is giving civilians. “The determination of Ukrainians to repulse the Kremlin’s invasion has taken many forms but few can sum it up better than the entry on an official website aimed at citizens living behind enemy lines. It reads: ‘How to start and steal a Russian tank.’ The online guidance comes complete with diagrams of a tank crew compartment and detailed instructions on how to get a T-72 moving, as well as information on accessing the fuel cap.”

University of Exeter: Efforts to take fake news and misinformation in Africa must take account of the continent’s unique “pavement media”, study shows

University of Exeter: Efforts to take fake news and misinformation in Africa must take account of the continent’s unique “pavement media”, study shows. “The spread of fake news through ‘pavement media’ in Africa means the continent needs unique techniques to tackle the spread of misinformation, a new study says. Discussions about current affairs in marketplaces, places of worship, bars, and other social spaces, and through songs, sermons, and graffiti form a key part of the media ecosystem in Africa.”

Radio Free Asia: How Russia’s disinformation on Ukraine is spreading to democratic Taiwan, via China

Radio Free Asia: How Russia’s disinformation on Ukraine is spreading to democratic Taiwan, via China. “Russian and Chinese disinformation about Ukraine, which is ideologically linked to ruling Chinese Communist Party (CCP) propaganda on Taiwan, is breaking through into online discourse on the democratic island, a fact-checking organization based there has said.”

NiemanLab: Putin’s control over Ukraine war news is being challenged by online news and risk-taking journalists

NiemanLab: Putin’s control over Ukraine war news is being challenged by online news and risk-taking journalists. “The Russian media is a powerful propaganda machine. Russian media outlets have been closely controlled by the government over the past several decades, and since Russia invaded Ukraine on Feb. 24, 2022, many journalists and editors have been turned into mere mouthpieces for the government line. But a few recent examples of journalistic defiance show that the Kremlin can’t guarantee full control over Russian journalists during the war. At the same time, Russians’ access to online information about the war constantly challenges the Kremlin’s lies about the invasion.”

TIME: Telegram Becomes a Digital Battlefield in Russia-Ukraine War

TIME: Telegram Becomes a Digital Battlefield in Russia-Ukraine War. “It’s difficult to imagine how Russia’s war in Ukraine would be playing out without Telegram. The messaging app, which last year reached a billion downloads, has turned into the conflict’s digital battle space. It’s an instrumental tool for both governments and a hub of information for citizens on both sides. Ukrainian government officials, including President Volodymyr Zelensky, rely on the app for everything from rallying global support to disseminating air raid warnings and maps of local bomb shelters. So do both the Russian government and Russian opposition channels, who now find themselves cut off from most mainstream social media.”

AFP: Neil Young demands Spotify remove his music over Joe Rogan ‘disinformation’

AFP: Neil Young demands Spotify remove his music over Joe Rogan ‘disinformation’. ” Neil Young demanded in an open letter to Spotify to remove his music from the platform he said is spreading vaccine disinformation via the popular podcaster Joe Rogan. ‘I am doing this because Spotify is spreading fake information about vaccines — potentially causing death to those who believe the disinformation being spread by them,’ wrote the legendary singer behind ‘Heart of Gold’ and ‘Harvest Moon.’”

FTC: Cease and Desist Demands show the role social media platforms play in the spread of dubious COVID claims

FTC: Cease and Desist Demands show the role social media platforms play in the spread of dubious COVID claims. “The Omicron variant has consumers saying ‘Omigosh,’ but even before the current surge, advertisers have been using questionable COVID-related claims to promote their products. FTC staff sent 25 more Cease and Desist Demands to businesses, most of whom have made unsubstantiated prevention or treatment representations for tinctures, teas, and sundry services. But there’s a key point that differentiates these Demands from the more than 400 letters that preceded them. Copies of the Cease and Desist Demands were sent to the social media platforms the advertisers used to convey their claims. For a numerical breakdown of those platforms, read on.”

Tech Xplore: Sharing on Facebook seems harmless, but leaked documents show how it may help spread misinformation

Tech Xplore: Sharing on Facebook seems harmless, but leaked documents show how it may help spread misinformation. “A video of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi seeming to slur her speech at an event tore through the internet, gaining steam on Facebook. Share after share, it spread to the point of going viral. The altered video from May 2019 was a slowed-down version of the actual speech the California Democrat gave but was being promoted as real. Even though Facebook acknowledged the video was fake, the company allowed it to stay on the platform, where it continued to be reshared. That exponential resharing was like rocket fuel to the manipulated video.”

Medical Xpress: Social media analysis reveals new insights into antivax movement

Medical Xpress: Social media analysis reveals new insights into antivax movement. “Analysis of social media posts in November and December 2021 shows the antivax movement is diverse and complex, with conflicting concepts and interpretations of freedom and human rights. The TIGER C19 project, run collaboratively between Burnet Institute and the University of Melbourne, has combined big data analytics of selected keywords and themes from Reddit and Twitter since the onset of COVID-19.”

New York University: Sources of Information Influence COVID-19 Knowledge, Protective Behaviors

New York University: Sources of Information Influence COVID-19 Knowledge, Protective Behaviors. “While those who rely on informal sources of information, such as social media or friends and family, had the lowest knowledge about COVID-19 and were less likely to take recommended steps to protect themselves and others, these interactive sources also held the most potential to help people to engage in healthful behaviors. The findings—drawn from surveys of more than 6,500 U.S. adults early in the COVID-19 pandemic—are published in PLOS ONE.”

Ohio State News: Groundbreaking ideas from women scientists get less attention

Ohio State News: Groundbreaking ideas from women scientists get less attention. “Researchers used a novel way of tracing the flow of ideas to find that even some of the most well-known breakthroughs in biomedical research from 1980 to 2008 had a more difficult road to adoption when research teams were dominated by women. Specifically, the five-year adoption rate of new ideas from female-majority teams was 23% lower than that of male-majority teams – even among the top 0.1% of ideas.”