Daily Dot: YouTube ads are rife with coronavirus conspiracies—from the same right-wing site

Daily Dot: YouTube ads are rife with coronavirus conspiracies—from the same right-wing site. “Others have complained about Epoch Times’ coronavirus ads in the past. An April 25 complaint on the company’s support page asked, ‘Why are you allowing “Epoch Times” to spread Alex Jones level conspiracy theories about COVID-19??!?’ But it’s not just YouTube; Epoch Times is all over the web. It presents itself as a new conservative publication, little different than the Breitbarts and Daily Wires of the world. But the more you look, the less that image holds up.”

New York Times: How the ‘Plandemic’ Movie and Its Falsehoods Spread Widely Online

New York Times: How the ‘Plandemic’ Movie and Its Falsehoods Spread Widely Online. “Just over a week after ‘Plandemic’ was released, it had been viewed more than eight million times on YouTube, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, and had generated countless other posts. The New York Times focused on the video’s spread on Facebook using data from CrowdTangle, a tool to analyze interactions across the social network. (YouTube and Twitter do not make their data as readily available.) The ascent of ‘Plandemic’ was largely powered by Facebook groups and pages that shared the YouTube link.”

How to fight the COVID-19 infodemic: lessons from 3 Asian countries (World Economic Forum)

World Economic Forum: How to fight the COVID-19 infodemic: lessons from 3 Asian countries. “What makes the current pandemic more dangerous than any before is that the spread of rumours and false information on the internet is even faster than that of the coronavirus itself. Sylvie Briand, director of the WHO’s Infectious Hazard Management department, could not have better emphasized the need for governments to battle this parallel yet more vicious outbreak – that of the ‘infodemic’, or information epidemic.”

EurekAlert: Researcher repurposes social networking models to predict COVID spread

EurekAlert: Researcher repurposes social networking models to predict COVID spread. “Since the COVID-19 epidemic began, there has been plenty of opportunity to observe how a vast array of truths, half-truths, and falsehoods can flare up and spread like wildfire across social media, swirl around, and just as quickly get buried and forgotten. It could serve as a fascinating case study for CSL and computer science professor Tarek Abdelzaher, who for years has studied how information propagates through social media. But he and his students Chaoqi Yang and Ruijie Wang have taken a big step further. They recognized that the dissemination of information through a population of online users is closely analogous to the transmission of a virus through a population of flesh-and-blood human beings, and that realization has inspired them to repurpose their information propagation models to predict COVID-19 spread. Furthermore, they have made the findings available to the public on an interactive website.”

CNET: How you talk about coronavirus actually impacts its spread

CNET: How you talk about coronavirus actually impacts its spread. “[Vicky Chuqiao] Yang and other researchers argue anecdotes like this show just how complicated the spread of COVID-19 is. Beyond coughs and contaminated surfaces, its movement also depends on the spread of information through the media and online, which can change human behavior and the trajectory of the epidemic.”

Slate: WhatsApp Limits Message Forwarding to Curb the Spread of Coronavirus Rumors

Slate: WhatsApp Limits Message Forwarding to Curb the Spread of Coronavirus Rumors. “On Tuesday, WhatsApp announced that it will impose strict limits on forwarding messages. It’s part of the messaging service’s push to slow the spread of false information about the coronavirus.”

Social media, spreading contagion: Twitter and Facebook are making the coronavirus pandemic worse (New York Daily News)

New York Daily News: Social media, spreading contagion: Twitter and Facebook are making the coronavirus pandemic worse. “It’s not news that social media platforms like Twitter and Facebook can be hotbeds of rumor and misinformation. Spend anytime online, and there’s a friend of a friend retweeting some implausible bit of Kardashian news. But the COVID-19 pandemic is showing that information on social media is particularly unreliable, a crapshoot of so-called advice that can have disastrous effects on public health. ”