The Verge: It sure seems like Google is struggling to invent the future

The Verge: It sure seems like Google is struggling to invent the future. “If companies want to attract the sort of people who are going to build the future, they have to be the type of place where people can actually go out on limbs and not be worried about getting in trouble for barking up the wrong tree. It’d be a shame if Google became a company where that wasn’t the case.”

Notre Dame News: Gender-diverse teams produce more novel, higher-impact scientific discoveries, study shows

Notre Dame News: Gender-diverse teams produce more novel, higher-impact scientific discoveries, study shows. “New research from the University of Notre Dame examines about 6.6 million papers published across the medical sciences since 2000 and reveals that a team’s gender balance is an under-recognized, yet powerful indicator of novel and impactful scientific discoveries.”

Nature: A global database for conducting systematic reviews and meta-analyses in innovation and quality management

Nature: A global database for conducting systematic reviews and meta-analyses in innovation and quality management. “This study presents a complete (from 1975–2021), up-to-date, preprocessed and geocoded bibliometric database combining published articles of the two themes. The data collection was performed following the PRISMA methodology. The database consists of seven data tables, including one core dataset with 59,231 records and six citation network-related tables, including latitude and longitude values of the affiliations.” Open Access

Cornell University: Tear down academic silos: Take an ‘undisciplinary’ approach

Cornell University: Tear down academic silos: Take an ‘undisciplinary’ approach. “Solving societal problems such as climate change could require dismantling rigid academic boundaries, so that researchers from varying disciplines could work together collaboratively – through an ‘undisciplinary’ approach, a new Cornell study suggests. Instead of rallying around a specific mission, it’s best to incorporate a human approach and fixate on the process to find solutions. The work published May 16 in Nature’s Humanities and Social Sciences Communications.”

Creativity as Survival: Crowdsourcing Unexpected Ways We Use Technology (North Carolina State University)

North Carolina State University: Creativity as Survival: Crowdsourcing Unexpected Ways We Use Technology. “I’m part of a team of researchers that is collecting examples of how people are using mobile, networked technologies to accomplish unexpected things – from improving local transportation in low-income communities to sharing information about public health. To identify examples of these innovative efforts, we are enlisting the public’s help. We’ve created a website called the Mobile Networked Creativity Repository to crowdsource examples from around the world.”

University of Oxford: Long-distance collaboration makes scientific breakthroughs more likely

University of Oxford: Long-distance collaboration makes scientific breakthroughs more likely. “In an analysis of data for over ten million research teams, across eleven academic fields from 1961 to 2020, a new working paper from the Oxford Martin Programme on the Future of Work has determined that over the past decade remote collaboration between academic teams has led to more scientific breakthroughs. This is a reversal of what was observed from the 1960s to the 2000s, when remote collaboration led to fewer scientific breakthroughs and more incremental innovation.”

US Department of Defense: Defense Department New Website to Navigate Innovation Opportunities

US Department of Defense: Defense Department New Website to Navigate Innovation Opportunities. “The new website features user-friendly sections, called ‘pathways,’ to quickly provide the most relevant information to the user based on interests. The first is for the academic community. Students and faculty can search available DoD internships, grants, scholarships, and research opportunities. Second, there is a pathway for those in the commercial sector seeking business opportunities with the DoD. Businesses can also learn about ways to seek specific science, technology, prototyping, and experimentation opportunities. The last pathway is designed for military personnel and DoD civilians looking to leverage existing projects, participate in workshops, or collaborate.”

MIT Sloan Management Review: The Data Boom Is Here — It’s Just Not Evenly Distributed

MIT Sloan Management Review: The Data Boom Is Here — It’s Just Not Evenly Distributed. “As Big Tech becomes evermore powerful thanks to the vast troves of data that the major platforms have collected, and innovation becomes increasingly data-driven, entrepreneurs and enterprises may find it difficult to seize new opportunities. Keeping the engine of innovation running will require access not only to capital but to data as well.”

HBR IdeaCast: Why Some Companies Thrived During the Pandemic

HBR IdeaCast: Why Some Companies Thrived During the Pandemic. “Keith Ferrazzi, founder of the consulting firm Ferrazzi Greenlight, led a survey of more than 2,000 executives to study how they reengineered operations during the pandemic. The research identified a kind of extreme adaptability at the team and organizational levels that helped some companies come out on top. Ferrazzi argues that after months of ruthlessly adapting, leaders should continue on a path of resilience and agility to stay competitive in the post-Covid-19 world.”

New York Times: Facebook Has an Innovation Problem

New York Times: Facebook Has an Innovation Problem. “Facebook can’t seem to do it. The company just doesn’t appear to know how to invent successful new stuff. Most of its biggest hits — not just two of its main products, Instagram and WhatsApp, but many of its most-used features, like Instagram Stories — were invented elsewhere. They made their way to Facebook either through acquisitions or, when that didn’t work, outright copying. But buying and copying other ideas is becoming increasingly difficult for Facebook.”

TechCrunch: Pinterest launches TwoTwenty, its own in-house incubator for new projects

TechCrunch: Pinterest launches TwoTwenty, its own in-house incubator for new projects. “Pinterest today announced a new initiative designed to help the company increase its pace of innovation. The company is introducing an in-house, experimental products team called TwoTwenty — named after the address of Pinterest’s first office. The team is comprised of engineers, designers and other product experts who will research, prototype and test new features and ideas, then identify those that gain traction. Successful products will be handed off to other teams within the company to take to scale.”

Ohio State News: Groundbreaking ideas from women scientists get less attention

Ohio State News: Groundbreaking ideas from women scientists get less attention. “Researchers used a novel way of tracing the flow of ideas to find that even some of the most well-known breakthroughs in biomedical research from 1980 to 2008 had a more difficult road to adoption when research teams were dominated by women. Specifically, the five-year adoption rate of new ideas from female-majority teams was 23% lower than that of male-majority teams – even among the top 0.1% of ideas.”

Fast Company: MIT built a Google search to spot the most important tech innovations of the future

Fast Company: MIT built a Google search to spot the most important tech innovations of the future . “Is there any way to predict the improvements coming to other technologies, ranging from displays, to electric motors, to farming equipment? Now there is, thanks to researchers at MIT. They’ve built the equivalent of a Google search for innovation. Using their online search engine, you can type in one of 1,757 different technologies, and get one sharp number, which is its expected rate of improvement each year.”

Wired: I Love Reading 1980s Computer Magazines, and So Should You

Wired: I Love Reading 1980s Computer Magazines, and So Should You. “Some species of technology go extinct for good reason. The penny-farthing, with its huge front wheel, seems vaguely ridiculous in retrospect—and also pretty dangerous. In a Darwinian struggle, it should die. But sometimes an innovation dies out for some other, lesser reason—one that’s more a function of the market at the time, or other considerations, than any overarching principle of quality…. Many other good ideas have gotten buried in the past and are waiting to be rediscovered.”