CNET: Australia has invented Shazam for spiders

CNET: Australia has invented Shazam for spiders. “Critterpedia is a collaboration between creators Nic and Murray Scare and Australia’s National Science Agency, CSIRO. It’s a machine learning engine designed to automatically identify different species of spiders and snakes. An AI-powered algorithm like Critterpedia requires hundreds of thousands of images to become accurate in its assessments, so CSIRO and Data 61 are hoping to get as many people as possible to download Critterpedia and upload pictures of spiders and snakes they might see in the wild.”

MakeUseOf: Google AR Adds 3D Insects to Its Search Results

MakeUseOf: Google AR Adds 3D Insects to Its Search Results. “Google AR search results are one of the coolest new things to come out of Google’s labs in recent months. After all, who doesn’t want to have a wide variety of animals blasted into their living room on command? Starting today, Google has made its augmented reality search results a bit more terrifying with the addition of 23 3D insects.”

Phys .org: How well do you know your bumblebees?

Phys .org: How well do you know your bumblebees?. “To mark Bees’ Needs Week, the X-Polli:Nation project launched the fun species identification tool which helps to distinguish bumblebee species in photos, in collaboration with Artificial Intelligence technologies. Users can use an interactive identification key, seek suggestions from automated image recognition and receive formative feedback through automatically generated texts. There are over 100 photos to practice on, organized in four difficulty levels.”

The Roanoke Star: 3D Imaging Expands Access to Rare Insect Collection

The Roanoke Star: 3D Imaging Expands Access to Rare Insect Collection. “The digital collection will include the digitized physical picture or 3D model of the insect and metadata including measurements, chemical compositions, ancient DNA information, and other biological or geographical information. This gives anyone with an Internet connection an opportunity to learn from the past and build on future policies and discoveries. Several scientifically valuable collections in the museum will be digitized, including specimens of federally endangered species and ecologically critical pollinators.”

Commonwealth Journals: New Tool For Identifying Pests of Woody Plants

Commonwealth Journal: New Tool For Identifying Pests of Woody Plants. “The University of Kentucky Department of Entomology has created a new, interactive website to help concerned tree owners identify their insect problems. The ‘Guide to Insect Pests of Woody Plants’ will hopefully be of use to you if you have the pest in hand or if you just have the damage they left behind.”

Phys .org: New insect database to help with forensic investigations

Phys .org: New insect database to help with forensic investigations . “Researchers at Cranfield University are using blowflies and other insects to develop a database which will provide a complementary method of estimating time since death in forensic investigations.”

Natural History Museum Blog: Digitising Butterfly types of the 21st century |Digital Collections Programme

Natural History Museum Blog: Digitising Butterfly types of the 21st century |Digital Collections Programme. “Some of the Museum’s invaluable butterfly reference material, previously only accessible to a handful of scientists, has been released onto the Museum’s Data Portal. Over 90% of these specimens were designated as types in the 21st Century, but this is the first time that images of many of these species have been freely accessible to the global community.”

Carnegie Mellon University: Online Atlas of Aquatic Insects Aids Water-Quality Monitoring

Carnegie Mellon University: Online Atlas of Aquatic Insects Aids Water-Quality Monitoring. “Carnegie Mellon University, working with Carnegie Museum of Natural History (CMNH), the Stroud Water Research Center, the University of Pittsburgh, Clemson University and a set of volunteer biomonitoring organizations, led development of the new visual atlas and digital field guide. It features highly detailed images of 150 common aquatic bugs, such as mayflies, dragonflies and beetles, along with a few mussels, clams and snails of interest.”

Lifehacker: Track Rare Cicadas With The Cicada Safari App

Lifehacker: Track Rare Cicadas With The Cicada Safari App. “A better way to track and document the cicadas in your area is to download the Cicada Safari app (free on Android and iOS) from Mount St. Joseph University. Right now, I can check a map for sightings, and as soon as my local cicadas begin to emerge, I can snap pictures of them for cicada scientists to study.”

CBC News: University of Calgary unveils digital archive of 300 different bee species

CBC News: University of Calgary unveils digital archive of 300 different bee species. “It’s World Bee Day and thanks to a new digital collection of images featuring species native to Alberta, the bee community will have a valuable new resource to enable it to study endangered species and develop healthier environments for bees.”

Bham Now: Alabama Butterfly Atlas adds new “search by color” feature. Site includes eggs, caterpillars and more

New-to-me: a site devoted to Alabama butterflies. From the article: “Launched in April 2017, the Alabama Butterfly Atlas (ABA) collects, interprets, and shares information about Alabama’s butterfly populations for the purpose of education and conservation. It puts science-based information into the hands of those who need it—students and teachers, gardeners, conservationists, and green space planners across the state.”

The Ohio State University: Triplehorn Insect Collection asks public to help label Arctic butterflies

The Ohio State University: Triplehorn Insect Collection asks public to help label Arctic butterflies . “The Triplehorn Insect Collection at Ohio State is asking for the public’s help in creating a digital archive of thousands of Arctic butterflies, which were donated in 2015 as part of a larger collection from alumnus David K. Parshall. The goal is to image and catalogue detailed data for each specimen.”

Purdue University: Online tool identifies best and safest places to keep bees

Purdue University: Online tool identifies best and safest places to keep bees. “Beekeepers must… identify safe places to establish their colonies. A new online tool, developed by entomologists from Penn State University in partnership with Purdue University, the University of Illinois, the University of Minnesota and Dickinson College, helps them do just that.” Currently the tool only provides information for Indiana, Illinois, and Pennsylvania, but more states will be added over time.

USDA: New Web Page Makes Info on Agricultural Pests and Diseases More Accessible

USDA: New Web Page Makes Info on Agricultural Pests and Diseases More Accessible. “Each year, the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) must respond to new threats to America’s agricultural and natural resources often in the form of invasive species or emerging diseases. To raise awareness about these growing threats and our efforts to manage, monitor and regulate their impacts, we’ve launched the new Pests & Diseases web page.”