MakeUseOf: How to Build Twitter, Instagram, and Reddit Bots Using Python

MakeUseOf: How to Build Twitter, Instagram, and Reddit Bots Using Python. “It’s 2019. You’ve heard of bots. There are chat bots, email bots, web scraping bots, and, social media bots. Have you created a bot yet? It’s surprisingly easy. Probably why they’re all over the place. Embrace our bot overlords by joining their rank. In this article, I’ll show you how you can leverage Python to interact with your Twitter, Reddit, and Instagram accounts automatically.”

Mashable: Instagram, Twitch, and other platforms helped creators make nearly $7 billion, study says

Mashable: Instagram, Twitch, and other platforms helped creators make nearly $7 billion, study says. “Creators in the U.S. are earning more than ever on internet platforms like Instagram, YouTube, and Tumblr — nearly $7 billion, according to a new study. The sprawling 97-page report by the Re:Create Coalition analyzes how many people in the U.S. are creating online content, where in the country they’re located, and how much they are earning. According to the study, nearly 17 million Americans earned an estimated $6.8 billion across nine internet platforms in 2017.”

Observer: Debunking the Myth of ‘Blogger Boyfriends’ and ‘Instagram Husbands’

Observer: Debunking the Myth of ‘Blogger Boyfriends’ and ‘Instagram Husbands’. “Toronto-based influencer Allegra Shaw has 234K followers on Instagram and 863K subscribers on YouTube. She also co-runs Uncle Studios, a sustainable clothing line. Her high-fashion style features occasional nods to the ‘influencer’ uniform (think: tiny sunglasses and biker shorts), but it’s her un-edited vlogs that set her apart from the rest. In them, she provides her viewers with an intimate look at the art of influencing and showcases her boyfriend’s role, too.”

Platform patricians and platform plebs: how social media favours the famous (New Statesman Tech)

New Statesman Tech: Platform patricians and platform plebs: how social media favours the famous. “In the spring of 2018, US celebrity Kim Kardashian uploaded a set of near nudes to her Instagram account to promote her new fragrance. The pictures were shocking, not for the skin shown but rather, for what they said about how content moderation rules on social media platforms are unequally enforced. Even though some of the pictures blurred particular body parts, it seems these platforms used a double standard. A regular user’s photos of the same nudity caliber drawing over 24,000 likes could have easily been banned. For the Instafamous, like Kim K, however, the photos remained.”

Chronicle of Higher Education: How to Get Students to Fill Out the Fafsa? Enlist Instagram Influencers

Chronicle of Higher Education: How to Get Students to Fill Out the Fafsa? Enlist Instagram Influencers. “Instagram influencers, or people who have a bevy of followers and manicured photos on the social-media website, will try to sell you weight-loss tea, prepared-meal kits, or subscription boxes of dog treats. Now, a select few influencers are hawking the Free Application for Federal Student Aid form.”

Wired: Child Stars Don’t Need Hollywood. They Have YouTube

Wired: Child Stars Don’t Need Hollywood. They Have YouTube. “In recent years, hundreds of kids have risen to bankable internet stardom on Instagram and YouTube. Marketers, ever the wordsmiths, have dubbed them ‘kidfluencers.’ They’re the child stars of the social media age, tiny captains of industry with their own toy lines and cookbooks. On Instagram, families seem to go for a controlled-chaos aesthetic—a Kondo’d Jon & Kate Plus 8. On YouTube, it’s more like late-capitalist Blue’s Clues. And somehow, despite the brand deals and the creeps in the comments and the constant watchfulness of parents’ cameras and the general ickiness our society attaches to living the most innocent years of your life on a public stage, these kids seem all right.” Man, I hope so.