Ars Technica: A decade and a half of instability: The history of Google messaging apps

Ars Technica: A decade and a half of instability: The history of Google messaging apps. “Google Talk, Google’s first-ever instant messaging platform, launched on August 24, 2005. This company has been in the messaging business for 16 years, meaning Google has been making messaging clients for longer than some of its rivals have existed. But thanks to a decade and a half of nearly constant strategy changes, competing product launches, and internal sabotage, you can’t say Google has a dominant or even stable instant messaging platform today.”

MakeUseOf: How to Use Facebook’s New Soundmojis on Messenger

MakeUseOf: How to Use Facebook’s New Soundmojis on Messenger. “There are different ways of expressing yourself on Facebook Messenger. You can call, via audio or video, sent plain text messages, audio messages, or even use emojis, GIFs, and stickers to convey a message. In addition to that, you can also now use Soundmojis—emojis with sound—which makes chatting even better. This article will explain what Soundmojis are, how Soundmojis work, and how to use them in Facebook Messenger.”

BGR: Sadly, you now need a Facebook account to start using Facebook Messenger

BGR: Sadly, you now need a Facebook account to start using Facebook Messenger. “A few years ago, Facebook made it possible for new Messenger users to start talking to their friends and family without registering for Facebook. That was actually a great way to stay off Facebook for anyone not happy with the intrusiveness of the world’s biggest social network, without giving up one of the best things about Facebook. Going forward, however, new Facebook Messenger users will have to register for a Facebook account to actually use the chat service.”

Cointelegraph: Researchers Find Thousands of Crypto Pump-and-Dump Groups on Messaging Apps

Cointelegraph: Researchers Find Thousands of Crypto Pump-and-Dump Groups on Messaging Apps. “There are thousands of pump-and-dump groups on popular messaging apps, a study conducted by the Social Science Research Network (SSRN) revealed Dec. 18. Pump-and-dump is the fraudulent practice of perpetrators encouraging unwitting investors to buy an asset to inflate its price artificially, and then selling it when the price gets high enough.”

[Update: Google statement] 2019 is your last year to use Google Hangouts if you haven’t moved on already (9to5Google)

9to5 Google: [Update: Google statement] 2019 is your last year to use Google Hangouts if you haven’t moved on already . “According to source familiar with the product’s internal roadmap, Google Hangouts for consumers will be shutting down sometime in 2020. That’s not surprising at all since Google essentially ceased development on the app more than a year ago. But just know, going into 2019, this is indeed your last year to keep using the beloved (?) legacy chat app.” I saw stories about this swirling all weekend. Google is saying it doesn’t have a date for shutting down Hangouts. Right now all I can say is if you rely on Google Hangouts, keep a close eye on this story.

TechCrunch: Yahoo Messenger is shutting down on July 17, redirects users to group messaging app Squirrel

TechCrunch: Yahoo Messenger is shutting down on July 17, redirects users to group messaging app Squirrel. “It’s the end of an era for Yahoo Messenger, one of the first instant messaging apps on the market. Today, Oath (which also owns TechCrunch) announced that it would be winding down the service on July 17 as it continues to experiment and consider how and if it can have a relevant place in the messaging landscape amid huge domination from Facebook and others in mobile apps.”

Mashable: Here’s why Reddit is replacing PMs with chat

Mashable: Here’s why Reddit is replacing PMs with chat. “Reddit is about to make one of its biggest changes yet. The site will soon launch a new instant messaging feature called Reddit Chat. Unlike Reddit’s current private messaging system, Reddit Chat will allow individual users and groups to connect instantaneously much like the chat features on Facebook or other social networks.”

CNET: AOL’s AIM sets its away message… permanently

And in our “Man-do-I-feel-old,” department, from CNET: AOL’s AIM sets its away message… permanently. “AOL Instant Messenger, a popular form of communication in the early days of the internet, goes dark on Dec. 15, AOL, now a unit of Verizon’s Oath, said on Friday. AIM was once one of the dominant instant-messaging platforms on the internet, helped by the massive number of dialup subscribers using AOL internet service. After launching in 1997, it enjoyed its peak in the late ’90s and early 2000s.”

Phys.org: Computer scientists address gap in messaging privacy

Phys.org: Computer scientists address gap in messaging privacy. “Researchers have developed a solution to a longstanding problem in the field of end-to-end encryption, a technique that ensures that only sender and recipient can read a message. With current end-to-end encryption, if an attacker compromises a recipient’s device, they can then put themselves in a position to intercept, read and alter all future communications without sender or recipient ever knowing.”

Fossbytes: What Is Sarahah? How To Use This Viral ‘Anonymous’ Messaging App?

Fossbytes: What Is Sarahah? How To Use This Viral ‘Anonymous’ Messaging App?. “Sarahah anonymous messaging app is currently one of the most popular apps on App Store. Created by a Saudi developer, Sarahah mobile app helps you discover your friends and co-workers and leave a feedback. You can also share your own profile link to invite “honest” feedback from others. While this app has garnered a huge following in a short span of time, it’s also facing flak due to cyber bullying possibilities.”

The Next Web: How secure is your favorite messaging app?

The Next Web: How secure is your favorite messaging app? “WhatsApp, Messenger, Facetime, iMessage, Allo, Telegram, Hangouts, Skype. You have dozens of mainstream messaging apps to choose from, each with tens—if not hundreds—of millions of users and more than enough features to fulfill your communication needs. But not all of these messaging apps are equally reliable in ensuring your privacy and security—a commodity that is becoming increasingly expensive and rare.”

Engadget: Keybase brings seamless encrypted chats to anyone on the web

Engadget: Keybase brings seamless encrypted chats to anyone on the web. “Keybase is on a mission to make end-to-end encryption as easy as possible, everywhere you go online. After launching frictionless encrypted file sharing last year, the open-source security company rolled out Keybase Chat, a desktop and mobile chat app that allows users to send encrypted messages to anyone on the internet using just their Twitter, Facebook or Reddit username. Today, Keybase announced a few new launches that will make it even easier to send encrypted messages to anyone — even if your recipient isn’t set up to receive them yet.”

CNET: Opera’s new browser lets you chat on WhatsApp while you work

CNET: Opera’s new browser lets you chat on WhatsApp while you work. “Opera today introduced a new browser that integrates messaging apps to its sidebar. Codenamed Reborn, the browser lets you chat with friends through Facebook Messenger, WhatsApp and Telegram on a side window while you work on the main browser. Other apps such as Viber and WeChat are not yet included in the support, although the company tells CNET it is working to make them available soon.”

How to Turn off Read Receipts on Various Social Media

Newstalk has a roundup of how to remove read receipts on various social media platforms. “Last week we told you about the new ‘read receipts’ feature on Twitter. This means the sender will know when the recipient has read a DM. While some people love the addition of this feature, others don’t like it at all. The small tick has become a staple of WhatsApp, Facebook and iMessage. If you’re not a fan, you can turn the receipt off on all of those platforms, without too much hassle. “