Economic Times: Film maker wins copyright infringement case against Google, YouTube

Economic Times: Film maker wins copyright infringement case against Google, YouTube. “Indian filmmaker Suneel Darshan has won a copyright infringement case against Google and its YouTube video-streaming platform, after an eight-year-long court battle.”

Ars Technica: Justices debate allowing state law to be “hidden behind a pay wall”

Ars Technica: Justices debate allowing state law to be “hidden behind a pay wall”. “The courts have long held that laws can’t be copyrighted. But if the state mixes the text of the law together with supporting information, things get trickier. In Monday oral arguments, the US Supreme Court wrestled with the copyright status of Georgia’s official legal code, which includes annotations written by LexisNexis.”

Bright Lines: Musicologists Police the Boundaries of Copyright Law (Variety)

Variety: Bright Lines: Musicologists Police the Boundaries of Copyright Law. “Todd Decker is a music historian who chairs the music department at Washington University in St. Louis. A few years ago, a local attorney called the department looking for help on a case. The lawyer represented Flame, a little-known Christian rapper who claimed that Katy Perry had ripped off his song in her 2014 smash hit ‘Dark Horse.’ Decker had never worked on a lawsuit before, but he volunteered his services as a forensic musicologist — an expert who parses melodies and chord structures to determine if two songs are ‘substantially similar.'”

The Register: Europol wipes out 30,000+ piracy sites, three suspects cuffed to walk the legal plank

The Register: Europol wipes out 30,000+ piracy sites, three suspects cuffed to walk the legal plank. “In total, Europol says it was able to shut down 30,506 domains. They also arrested three people, seized 26,000 pieces of clothing and perfume, grabbed 363 litres of alcohol (about 10 Reg holiday parties), an unspecified number of hardware devices, and upwards of €150,000 in bank and online payment accounts.”

The End Of Ownership, Military Edition: Even The US Military Can’t Fix Its Own Equipment Without Right To Repair Laws (Techdirt)

Techdirt: The End Of Ownership, Military Edition: Even The US Military Can’t Fix Its Own Equipment Without Right To Repair Laws. “This lack of a ‘right to repair’ is showing up in more and more places including, somewhat incredibly, the US military. The NY Times recently ran an op-ed from Capt. Elle Ekman, a logistics officer in the US Marine Corps., expressing her dismay at how the lack of right to repair laws is actually making it difficult to impossible for the US military to repair its own equipment.”

Publishers Weekly: Educational Publishers File Suit to Block Sale of Pirated E-books

Publishers Weekly: Educational Publishers File Suit to Block Sale of Pirated E-books. “According to the lawsuit filed in the U. S. District Court for the Southern District of New York, the pirate sites are selling unlicensed e-books using Google ads which they place in response to searches for the publishers’ legitimate content. While the lawsuit proceeds, the publishers, through the Educational Publishers Enforcement Group which brought the action, were granted a temporary restraining order that calls for the immediate shut down of the illegal activity on these sites, as well as the cessation of the services that support the sites.”

BBC: Rise of comic book piracy ‘a real problem’

BBC: Rise of comic book piracy ‘a real problem’. “A comic book writer’s claim that the proliferation of piracy is “a real problem” has encouraged others in the industry to share their concerns. Jim Zub, who writes for Marvel and IDW, tweeted that 20 times as many people read comics illegally shared online, than pay for digital or physical works.”