Internet Archive: Books from 1923 to 1941 Now Liberated!

Internet Archive: Books from 1923 to 1941 Now Liberated!. “The Internet Archive is now leveraging a little known, and perhaps never used, provision of US copyright law, Section 108h, which allows libraries to scan and make available materials published 1923 to 1941 if they are not being actively sold. Elizabeth Townsend Gard, a copyright scholar at Tulane University calls this “Library Public Domain.” She and her students helped bring the first scanned books of this era available online in a collection named for the author of the bill making this necessary: The Sonny Bono Memorial Collection. Thousands more books will be added in the near future as we automate. We hope this will encourage libraries that have been reticent to scan beyond 1923 to start mass scanning their books and other works, at least up to 1942.”

Times Higher Education: Publishers seek removal of millions of papers from ResearchGate

Times Higher Education: Publishers seek removal of millions of papers from ResearchGate. “Leading publishers are stepping up their fight against ResearchGate by ordering the academic social network to take down papers that they say infringe copyright. The move could see millions of articles removed from the site, as the publishers say up to 40 per cent of papers on ResearchGate are copyrighted.”

Spencer Greenhalgh: Copyright, Fair Use, and Creative Commons in 7 more videos

From my Twitter buddy Spencer Greenhalgh: Copyright, Fair Use, and Creative Commons in 7 more videos. “Last year, I wrote a post about a series of YouTube videos that I used to give a guest lecture on copyright, fair use, and Creative Commons. It went well enough that I was asked to come back this year and guest lecture again. I made some tweaks to the presentation this time around, switching the order of some of the videos, and replacing a couple of them…. Rather than write everything out here (since there is a lot of overlap with last year’s post), I’ll embed the slides for the new presentation here; you can also check out this link if you want to see my presentation notes, too.”

WIPR: Germany’s Supreme Court backs Google over thumbnail images

World Intellectual Property Review: Germany’s Supreme Court backs Google over thumbnail images. “Germany’s Federal Court of Justice has backed search engine Google in a dispute over whether the use of thumbnail images constitutes copyright infringement. The applicant in the dispute operates a website that offers photographs.”

Cearta: The copyright implications of a publicly curated online archive of Oireachtas debates

Cearta: The copyright implications of a publicly curated online archive of Oireachtas debates. “From a twitter thread by Philip Boucher-Hayes last week, I learned that Ken Foxe had reported in the Irish Mail on Sunday that nearly ten years of video footage of Oireachtas debates and hearings had been taken offline. A spokesperson for the Houses of the Oireachtas said that the videos were removed because they had little traffic and were in an obsolete format. However, after an outcry online, the footage was restored, though with limited functionality. To overcome first the takedown, and then the limitations, various concerned netizens – including, I understand, Gerard Cunningham, Emerald De Leeuw, Elaine Edwards, and Sterling Plisken – have begun work on a publicly curated online archive of Oireachtas debates and hearings.”

When filters fail: These cases show we can’t trust algorithms to clean up the internet (Julia Reda)

Julia Reda: When filters fail: These cases show we can’t trust algorithms to clean up the internet. “Installing censorship infrastructure that surveils everything people upload and letting algorithms make judgement calls about what we all can and cannot say online is an attack on our fundamental rights. But there’s another key question: Does it even work? The [European Commission] claims that where automatic filters have already been implemented voluntarily – like YouTube’s Content ID system – ‘these practices have shown good results’. Oh, really? Here are examples of filters getting it horribly wrong, ranging from hilarious to deeply worrying…”

NJIT: NJIT Launches Annotated Patent History Archive

New Jersey Institute of Technology: NJIT Launches Annotated Patent History Archive. “The Federated History Department at New Jersey Institute of Technology and Rutgers University-Newark has launched the Annotated Patent History Digital Archive. Funded by a faculty seed grant from NJIT, this project makes use of undergraduate, graduate, and faculty research to explore the history of patents in the United States. While both the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and Google maintain databases of every patent filed in the United States, there is no resource online that puts these technical documents into context. The Annotated Patent History Digital Archive changes this.”