CNET: Facebook accused of stealing Calibra logo from online bank Current

CNET: Facebook accused of stealing Calibra logo from online bank Current. “Current, an online banking company, has accused Facebook of borrowing its logo for the social network’s newly unveiled cryptocurrency play. The Calibra logo bears a resemblance to Current’s logo, the company tweeted Thursday, as reported earlier by CNBC.” I recommend this article if you haven’t done your daily eyeroll exercises yet.

Boing Boing: Countries with longer copyright terms have access to fewer books (pay attention, Canada!)

Boing Boing: Countries with longer copyright terms have access to fewer books (pay attention, Canada!). “Rebecca Giblin (previously) writes, “We’ve just dropped a new study we’ve been working on for a year. You know how it keeps being claimed that we need longer copyrights because nobody will invest in making works available if they’re in the public domain? Heald and some others have done some great work debunking that in the US context, but now we’ve finally tested this hypothesis in other countries by looking at the relative availability of ebooks to libraries.”

Creative Commons: Looking forward and back: Five years at Creative Commons

Creative Commons: Looking forward and back: Five years at Creative Commons. “This month, I’ll mark five years as CEO at Creative Commons. That makes me the longest-serving CEO in the organization’s history, and it’s also the longest I’ve served with the same job title. Every day I get to work with some of the brightest, most dedicated staff and community members in the open movement. Anniversaries are a good time to reflect, and as we all arrive home from our annual CC Summit in Lisbon, I wanted to share a few reflections on where we’ve come from, and where we’re headed.”

The Next Web: Sorry, but you can’t copyright a meme

The Next Web: Sorry, but you can’t copyright a meme. “Epic Games, creator of the smash hit Fortnite, currently faces a tornado of lawsuits over its use and sale of in-game animations based on dance moves popularized by celebrities. The Supreme Court is involved, the public is divided, and entertainers are seemingly getting screwed. But who really owns a meme? For the answer to that question we turned to legal experts and the ghost of a dancing celebrity from the 1930s.”

Reuters: Poland files complaint with EU’s top court over copyright rule change

Reuters: Poland files complaint with EU’s top court over copyright rule change. “Poland has submitted a complaint to the European Union’s top court against copyright rules adopted by the bloc in April to protect Europe’s creative industries, which Warsaw says may result in preventive censorship.”

The Verge: YouTubers And Record Labels Are Fighting, And Record Labels Keep Winning

The Verge: YouTubers And Record Labels Are Fighting, And Record Labels Keep Winning. “Copyright issues have plagued YouTube and its community for years, but creators are calling this moment in time one of the worst eras for trying to navigate the platform. Over the past six months, multiple YouTubers have run into issues with what they describe as aggressive copyright claims from record labels.”

Mashable: Facebook reveals more details on AR glasses in new patent

Mashable: Facebook reveals more details on AR glasses in new patent . “We may still be years away from Facebook’s augmented reality glasses becoming an actual product, but we now know a little more about how they might work. A new patent filing reveals additional details about Facebook’s AR glasses, including how they might handle audio. The patent, originally filed in January but published Thursday, describes a ‘cartilage conduction audio system for eyewear devices.'”