The Verge: Exif is a clever tool that stops people from stealing your photos

The Verge: Exif is a clever tool that stops people from stealing your photos. “Exif applies an embedding-as-sharing model to photography. Upload your photos to Exif and it will generate HTML-based embed codes that websites can use to put your photos in a post. It replaces the standard way of doing things, which usually requires someone who works for said website to download that photo and upload it to their own hosting service or CMS. These steps sometimes strip out the image’s metadata, and they also introduce break points in the process where that person’s carelessness could mean the photographer never receives (or has to fight for) proper credit and compensation.”

Artnet News: Company Launches Tool for Weeding Out Fake Artworks Sold on the Dark Web

Artnet News: Company Launches Tool for Weeding Out Fake Artworks Sold on the Dark Web. “As online sales grow, so too do the chances of being conned. But fraudsters beware: a new tool launched by the Washington, DC-based consultancy Art Fraud Insights has been developed to spot fake artworks sold on the dark web, as well as identify those behind the spurious transactions.”

Backchannel: How Google Book Search Got Lost

Backchannel: How Google Book Search Got Lost. “Today, Google is known for its moonshot culture, its willingness to take on gigantic challenges at global scale. Books was, by general agreement of veteran Googlers, the company’s first lunar mission. Scan All The Books! In its youth, Google Books inspired the world with a vision of a ‘library of utopia’ that would extend online convenience to offline wisdom. At the time it seemed like a singularity for the written word: We’d upload all those pages into the ether, and they would somehow produce a phase-shift in human awareness. Instead, Google Books has settled into a quiet middle age of sourcing quotes and serving up snippets of text from the 25 million-plus tomes in its database.”

TorrentFreak: Russia Wants To Hold Social Networks Liable For Internet Piracy

TorrentFreak: Russia Wants To Hold Social Networks Liable For Internet Piracy. “A new proposal from the Russian government could see social networks held liable for piracy committed by their users. The Ministry of Culture says that social platforms should be stripped of their status as information intermediaries and held to account when infringing content is made available on their sites if they fail to take appropriate measures to tackle piracy.”

World Intellectual Property Review: Federal Circuit affirms data patent after Google challenge

World Intellectual Property Review: Federal Circuit affirms data patent after Google challenge. “The US Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit has upheld the validity of a data transmission patent, after Google had sought to invalidate it through an inter partes review (IPR). Google had appealed against a decision of the Patent Trial and Appeal Board (PTAB), which upheld the validity of US patent number 8,601,154 during the IPR.”

Advertising Age: Meet the Man Behind YouTube’s Sudden Ad Crisis. He Has a Patented Fix

Advertising Age: Meet the Man Behind YouTube’s Sudden Ad Crisis. He Has a Patented Fix. “Major marketers’ ads have likely been showing up on or near YouTube videos promoting terrorism, neo-Nazi groups and other web content for a long time. So why has the brand-safety problem suddenly burst into the open, prompting big advertisers such as General Motors, Walmart, Verizon, AT&T and Johnson & Johnson to stop spending on YouTube or other Google properties? Thank — or blame — Eric Feinberg, a longtime marketing-services executive who in recent months has made it his mission to find ad-supported content linked to terror and hate groups, then push links and screen shots proving it happened to journalists in the U.K. and U.S.”

TorrentFreak: Google Gets More WordPress.com Takedown Requests Than WordPress Itself

TorrentFreak: Google Gets More WordPress.com Takedown Requests Than WordPress Itself. “WordPress has published new data on the number of piracy takedown notices the company receives. Of all the DMCA requests copyright holders sent, roughly 40% were rejected due to inaccuracies or abuse. Most interesting, perhaps, is that Google processes more WordPress.com takedowns than WordPress itself.”