Ars Technica: It’s criminal charges and leg shackles for man who shared Deadpool on Facebook

Ars Technica: It’s criminal charges and leg shackles for man who shared Deadpool on Facebook. “A California man who shared a copy of the movie Deadpool on Facebook has been arrested and charged with criminal copyright infringement. If convicted, he faces a penalty of up to three years in prison.”

Ars Technica: Supreme Court will weigh in on troll-killing patent-review process

Ars Technica: Supreme Court will weigh in on troll-killing patent-review process. “The Supreme Court has often overturned Federal Circuit rulings in recent years, and that pattern has generally led to rulings that are praised by opponents of so-called ‘patent trolls,’ a colloquial term for non-practicing entities—the licensing shops that file the majority of patent lawsuits. But if the Supreme Court continues that pattern in one of its next cases, it could actually result in the wholesale elimination of one of the most powerful tools for fighting patent trolls.”

Techdirt: Another Day, Another Bogus YouTube Takedown Because Of A Major Label

Techdirt: Another Day, Another Bogus YouTube Takedown Because Of A Major Label. “We’re constantly hearing about bogus takedowns thanks to bogus copyright claims, some more amusing than others. Last week we had Ariana Grande’s benefit concert in Manchester getting blocked by ContentID, despite being on her own channel. And now (via Sarah Jeong) we’ve got the band the Dandy Warhols rightfully complaining on Twitter that the video for the single ‘You Are Killing Me’ off of their 2016 album has been blocked on YouTube via a copyright claim from Universal Music Group.” Dandy Warhols aren’t on the Universal label. There should be financial consequences for this kind of stuff.

USPTO director Michelle Lee has resigned without warning (Ars Technica)

Ars Technica: USPTO director Michelle Lee has resigned without warning. “Director of the US Patent and Trademark Office Michelle Lee resigned today, without explanation. Lee, who has been director of the office since 2014, was a favored candidate by the tech sector, who thought she brought a balanced approach to patents. She is a former Google lawyer and was one of the first corporate lawyers to speak out about the problem of so-called ‘patent trolls.’ “

Library of Congress: Copyright Office Launches Online Database of Review Board Decisions

Library of Congress: Copyright Office Launches Online Database of Review Board Decisions. “Today, the Office is pleased to announce the launch of an online database of recent decisions (April 2016 to present) made by the Copyright Office Review Board. The Office will update the database as new decisions are issued. The Review Board makes final determinations on second appeals regarding decisions to refuse copyright registration. Types of works that fall under the Board’s review range from music, jewelry design, computer programs, and more.”

Alan Levine: If Dave Pell Won’t Attribute His Images I Guess Someone Has to Help

Alan Levine: If Dave Pell Won’t Attribute His Images I Guess Someone Has to Help. “I don’t know Dave Pell but I read his medium posts. He’s a good writer, and publishes NextDraft “a quick and entertaining look at the day’s most fascinating news.” Dave has 126,000 followers on medium. He uses great lead photos in his posts. He never, ever, as far as I can see, attributes the sources of his photos.”

Sydney Morning Herald: Google staves off death of its brand name, avoiding fate of Kleenex and Yo-Yo

Sydney Morning Herald: Google staves off death of its brand name, avoiding fate of Kleenex and Yo-Yo. “No matter how often you invoke a certain internet search engine’s name when doing online research, its parent company Alphabet still owns the brand. That’s the upshot of a US Federal Appeals Court’s decision on Tuesday rejecting the argument that Google has become so popular as a verb that it should lose its status as a protected trademark.”