Watch recording for case: David Elliott v. Google Inc., No. 15-15809 (Ninth Circuit)

This popped up in my Google Alerts, and I don’t think I’ve never seen this before. From the United States Ninth Circuit Court: Watch recording for case: David Elliott v. Google Inc., No. 15-15809. It’s about half an hour and the video is on YouTube as well as embedded on the page. The “United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit” YouTube Channel has what looks like hundreds of videos.

Library of Congress Launches New Blog — Copyright: Creativity at Work

The Library of Congress has launched a new blog called Copyright: Creativity at Work. “The blog will introduce readers to the important work of the Copyright Office and its multitalented staff—many of whom have a personal stake as musicians, artists, and book lovers in the office’s mission to support authors and users of creative works. Upcoming posts will inform readers about the office’s studies and reports, developments in domestic and international copyright law and policy, registration practice and other exciting news related to the Office.”

Complete Music Update: Facebook advertising for Legal Director of Music Licensing

Complete Music Update: Facebook advertising for Legal Director of Music Licensing. “Facebook is continuing to build a new team to sort out music licensing on the social network. Having headhunted Tamara Hrivnak from YouTube in January to work on the social network’s ‘global music strategy’, it’s now advertising for a Legal Director of Music Licensing.”

CNET: Google camera hat takes on Snap, and then some

Google has apparently patented a camera hat. “Budding paparazzi rejoice. A new patent filed Tuesday by Google reveals what could become the newest tool for grabbing candid shots of the Kardashian clan — although that particular use case isn’t mentioned in the document.” I can see this being useful for work.

Google Report: 99.95 Percent Of DMCA Takedown Notices Are Bot-Generated Bullshit Buckshot (Techdirt)

From Techdirt, which is not into word-mincing: Google Report: 99.95 Percent Of DMCA Takedown Notices Are Bot-Generated Bullshit Buckshot. “…Google noted that more than half the takedown notices it was receiving in 2009 were mere attempts by one business targeting a competitor, while over a third of the notices contained nothing in the way of a valid copyright dispute. But if those numbers were striking in 2009, Google’s latest comment to the Copyright Office (see our own comment here) on what’s happening in the DMCA 512 notice-and-takedown world shows some stats for takedown notices received through its Trusted Copyright Removal Program… and makes the whole ordeal look completely silly.”

The Internet Archive Pushes Back on “Notice and Staydown” in Recent Comments to the Copyright Office (Internet Archive)

Internet Archive: The Internet Archive Pushes Back on “Notice and Staydown” in Recent Comments to the Copyright Office. “The US Copyright Office sought comments in its ongoing study of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) Section 512 safe harbor study. They are generally looking to find out how well the notice and takedown system is working for everyone—Internet platforms and users, as well as creators and copyright holders. We think the 1998 statute struck the right balance and is generally working well, a view shared by nearly all Internet platforms and users. However, some incumbent rightsholders and their advocacy organizations disagree and think the system needs to be completely redone because it is too hard to police copyright infringement online. These complaints fail to account for the exceeding high statutory damages rightsholders can claim and other mechanisms in copyright law that favor certain categories of rightsholders over new media creators and consumers.”

Recode: Alphabet’s Waymo is suing Otto and Uber for allegedly stealing the design of a key self-driving system

Recode: Alphabet’s Waymo is suing Otto and Uber for allegedly stealing the design of a key self-driving system. “Waymo, formerly Google’s self-driving car unit, is suing Otto — the self-driving trucking company co-founded by former Waymo employee Anthony Levandowski and quickly acquired by Uber — for allegedly stealing the company’s proprietary design for its laser-based radar system.”