Pitchfork: How Artist Imposters and Fake Songs Sneak Onto Streaming Services

Pitchfork: How Artist Imposters and Fake Songs Sneak Onto Streaming Services. “Suspicious bootlegs and fraudulent uploads are nothing new in digital music, but the problem has infiltrated paid streaming services in unexpected and troubling ways. Artists face the possibility of impersonators uploading fake music to their official profiles, stolen music being uploaded under false monikers, and of course, simple human error resulting in botched uploads. Meanwhile, keen fans have figured out where they can find illegally uploaded, purposefully mistitled songs in user playlists.”

TorrentFreak: Internet Archive Faces Permanent ISP Blocking Following Audiobook Lawsuits

TorrentFreak: Internet Archive Faces Permanent ISP Blocking Following Audiobook Lawsuits. “An anti-piracy group representing the rights of authors is calling for the Internet Archive to be blocked by ISPs in Russia forever. A pair of lawsuits concerning two audiobooks, including Metro 2033, led to the request to have the massively popular Archive.org permanently rendered inaccessible in the region. A legal process is now underway to avoid that happening.”

Techdirt: Why Is MLB Claiming Revenue From Obviously Fair Use Videos On YouTube?

Techdirt: Why Is MLB Claiming Revenue From Obviously Fair Use Videos On YouTube?. “Nearly a decade ago, we wrote a bunch about an excellent book called Copyfraud, by law professor Jason Mazzone, which went into great detail about how the legacy entertainment industry companies have used copyright in ways that are clearly against copyright’s intent — to the point that they border on fraud. The concept of copyfraud should be referred to more frequently, and here’s a perfect example.”

Popular Science: Posting a copyright notice on social media doesn’t actually accomplish anything

Popular Science: Posting a copyright notice on social media doesn’t actually accomplish anything . “f you’ve logged into Instagram since last week, you may have seen people posting a long, typo-laden screed about a new rule going into effect that gives the company the ability to sell, use, or share your photos unless you repost a specific message denying it. I have even seen a few famous photographers doing it. The statement sounds official, but it’s actually just the latest iteration of an internet chain letter that won’t do anything to protect your privacy or intellectual property from the social media networks or the wilds of the internet in general.”

The Verge: YouTube sues alleged copyright troll over extortion of multiple YouTubers

The Verge: YouTube sues alleged copyright troll over extortion of multiple YouTubers. “YouTube is going after an alleged copyright troll using the Digital Millennium Copyright Act’s (DMCA) provisions, alleging that Christopher Brady used false copyright strikes to extort YouTube creators, harming the company in the process. Now, YouTube is suing Brady, using the DMCA’s provisions against fraudulent takedown claims, seeking compensatory damages and an injunction against future fraudulent claims.”

TorrentFreak: Anti-Piracy Efforts Are Unlikely to Beat Sci-Hub

TorrentFreak: Anti-Piracy Efforts Are Unlikely to Beat Sci-Hub. “Elsevier and other academic publishers see ‘pirate’ site Sci-Hub as a major threat to their billion-dollar industries. Many researchers, however, can’t function properly without the notorious site. Since anti-piracy efforts are unlikely to beat the site, perhaps it’s time for the publishers to draw a lesson from Sci-Hub instead?”

TorrentFreak: Rightsholders Remove Google Results of Legal Search Engine ‘JustWatch’

TorrentFreak: Rightsholders Remove Google Results of Legal Search Engine ‘JustWatch’. “Copyright holders would like Google to be more proactive when it comes to piracy. The company should promote legal services in its search results, is an often heard suggestion. A good idea perhaps but, at the moment, some copyright holders are taking things in the opposite direction.”