Disappearing movies and games: How safe is your digital collection? (The Age)

The Age: Disappearing movies and games: How safe is your digital collection?. “It’s not just video content, either. We’ve also gone digital in a big way for music (only 25 per cent of revenue in 2017 was from physical formats like vinyl and CD) and interactive electronic games (just one dollar in every five comes from actual disc sales). Only books are bucking the trend, with e-books accounting for less than a fifth of the market. You don’t have to be a devotee of Marie Kondo – author of the 2014 bestseller The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up – to see why. Digital libraries are just so much neater, tidier, more space-efficient. But are they as safe?”

Everybody’s Libraries: Announcing a draft guide for identifying public domain serial content

Everybody’s Libraries: Announcing a draft guide for identifying public domain serial content. “Back in June, I announced that we had completed an inventory of all serials with active copyright renewals made through 1977, based on listings in the Copyright Office’s Catalog of Copyright Entries. At the time, I said we’d also be releasing a draft of suggested procedures for using the information there, along with other data, to quickly identify and check public domain serial content. (If you’ve been following the Public Domain Day advent calendar I’ve been publishing this month, you’ll have seen the inventory or its records mentioned in some recent entries.) It took a little longer than I’d hoped, but after having some librarians and IP experts have a look at it, I’m pleased to announce that the draft of ‘Determining copyright status of serial issues’ is open for public comment.”

Washington Post: Step aside Edison, Tesla and Bell. New measurement shows when U.S. inventors were most influential.

Washington Post: Step aside Edison, Tesla and Bell. New measurement shows when U.S. inventors were most influential.. “The U.S. patent office has stockpiled the text to more than 10 million patents. But that’s often all they have: an enormous amount of text. Many early patents lack any form of citation or industry specification, which researchers could use to understand the history of American invention. Now a team of economists has created a clever algorithm that processes that text — often the only consistent data we have for many of the country’s most famous inventions — to create a measure of the influential inventors and industries of the past 180 years.”

The Register: The dingo… er, Google stole my patent! Biz boss tells how Choc Factory staff tried to rip off idea from interview

The Register: The dingo… er, Google stole my patent! Biz boss tells how Choc Factory staff tried to rip off idea from interview . “Jie Qi, cofounder of edu-tech electronics biz Chibitronics, marked the launch of patent education site PatentPandas.org with her account of how Google tried to patent her research after inviting her to meet with company executives.”

Everybody’s Libraries Launches Public Domain Day Advent Calendar for December

Everybody’s Libraries has started a Public Domain Day Advent Calendar. “During the month of December, this blog will feature various works from 1923 that will be joining the public domain in the US this coming January 1, Public Domain Day. The Prophet is fairly well-known and still easy to find in print. Many other interesting works from 1923 are not so well-known or easy to find, and I hope to feature a wide variety of works over the next 31 days. (I already have some works planned to feature, but have not yet filled out a full roster; if there are any in particular you’d like to suggest, let me know by commenting here or by contacting me.)”

Ars Technica: I’ve got a bridge to sell you. Why AutoCAD malware keeps chugging on

Ars Technica: I’ve got a bridge to sell you. Why AutoCAD malware keeps chugging on. “Criminal hackers continue to exploit a feature in Autodesk’s widely used AutoCAD program in an attempt to steal valuable computer-assisted designs for bridges, factory buildings, and other projects, researchers said Tuesday.”

New Scientist: Time to break academic publishing’s stranglehold on research

New Scientist: Time to break academic publishing’s stranglehold on research. “HERE is a trivia question for you: what is the most profitable business in the world? You might think oil, or maybe banking. You would be wrong. The answer is academic publishing. Its profit margins are vast, reportedly in the region of 40 per cent. The reason it is so lucrative is because most of the costs of its content is picked up by taxpayers. Publicly funded researchers do the work, write it up and judge its merits. And yet the resulting intellectual property ends up in the hands of the publishers.”