Virtual Workshop Recap: Towards Better Sharing of Cultural Heritage (Creative Commons)

Creative Commons: Virtual Workshop Recap: Towards Better Sharing of Cultural Heritage. “We are developing our first ever CC Open Culture Guide for Policymakers to address the copyright barriers to universal access and reuse of knowledge and culture faced by GLAMs. To initiate this process, we held an interactive virtual workshop for policy experts and open culture enthusiasts to explore key policy issues and gather insights into how to effectively engage policy makers in our work.”

JD Supra: UK Considers How to Tackle Trend of Social Media Influencers Promoting Counterfeit Products

JD Supra: UK Considers How to Tackle Trend of Social Media Influencers Promoting Counterfeit Products. “The United Kingdom’s intellectual property laws provide to rights owners important protections, which encourage creativity and drives the free market economy. However, changing attitudes around counterfeits, the growth of the digital economy, and the continued influence of social media have culminated in ever-increasing violations of such rights, potentially resulting in direct harm to the market, stalled development, and the undermining of public welfare. More recently, influencers have come under scrutiny for facilitating trade in counterfeit products.”

Search Engine Land: DMCA request removes Moz from Google Search index

Search Engine Land: DMCA request removes Moz from Google Search index. “If you search for [Moz] in Google Search, you won’t be seeing the moz.com home page, that page was removed from the Google index due to a DMCA takedown request. The takedown complaint cites that Moz’s home page, along with 185 other URLs were ‘distribute modified, cracked and unauthorized versions’ of the Dr. Driving app.” Moz has since been restored.

New York Times: In Echo of Soviet Era, Russia’s Movie Theaters Turn to Pirate Screenings

New York Times: In Echo of Soviet Era, Russia’s Movie Theaters Turn to Pirate Screenings. “The screenings are reminiscent of the Soviet era, when the only way to see most Western films was to get access to a pirated version. Whereas those movies made their way to Russians in the form of smuggled VHS tapes, today, cinemas in the country have a simpler, faster method: the internet. Numerous websites offer bootleg copies of movies that take minutes to download. Some theaters in Russia are now openly screening pirated movies; others are being more careful, allowing private individuals to rent out spaces to show films, free or for a fee.”

Vedomosti: Movies, series and music from unfriendly countries legalized through compulsory license

Vedomosti, and machine-translated from Russian: Movies, series and music from unfriendly countries legalized through compulsory license. “The Russian authorities have found a way to keep films, series, music and other intellectual property in the country from companies from unfriendly countries that have announced they are leaving or suspending their activities in Russia. For this, a bill is being developed that expands the effect of a compulsory license, two interlocutors familiar with the discussion of the initiative told Vedomosti.”

Techdirt: Disney Gets Fans Who Made Their Own ‘Club Penguin’ Online Game Arrested Over Copyright

Techdirt: Disney Gets Fans Who Made Their Own ‘Club Penguin’ Online Game Arrested Over Copyright. “In the pantheon of aggressive intellectual property bullies, Disney certainly would be one of the companies that would be competing to be Zeus. Disney has simply never seen an opportunity for IP enforcement that it hasn’t acted upon, be it copyright, trademark, or anywhere in between. More to the point for this post, Disney also has this fun mindset that even if it isn’t going to use an IP it owns, it doesn’t like it if anyone else does, either…. Remember Club Penguin?”

Mashable: How to report plagiarized NFTs as stolen art

Mashable: How to report plagiarized NFTs as stolen art. “So you’ve been ripped off. Someone took your art and, without your permission, minted it as a non-fungible token. And now that same scammer has listed those NFTs of your plagiarized art for sale, and is raking in the ill-gotten gains. This is a depressingly common occurrence, and thankfully you’re not completely without recourse — though getting your stolen art removed from massive NFT exchanges like OpenSea and Rarible isn’t going to be easy.”

Orange County Register: Santa Ana police blasted Disney songs to prevent a resident from filming them

Orange County Register: Santa Ana police blasted Disney songs to prevent a resident from filming them . “The idea, according to the videographer and others, was that because social media platforms remove home-made videos with copyright-protected music, any video made by the blogger wouldn’t spend much time online and wouldn’t be seen by many people. The video was shot anyway. And it wound up starring Santa Ana police and a city councilman, Johnathan Ryan Hernandez, who chastised an officer for waking his neighbors and disrespecting his community.”

University of Missouri: MU professor says Google v. Oracle case leaves fair use ‘muddy’

University of Missouri: MU professor says Google v. Oracle case leaves fair use ‘muddy’. “After more than a decade of litigation, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in 2021 that Google did not violate copyright laws by including 11,500 lines of code from Java (which is owned by Oracle) in its own Android operating system. It was the first time the court updated fair use precedents since 1994 and one of the few cases specifically addressing how these laws intersect with software development. Now, new research from Gary Myers, Earl F. Nelson Professor of Law at the University of Missouri School of Law, is urging another look at the consequences of the Supreme Court’s decision. He said the ruling could introduce uncertainty when deciding how new software can build on what came before.”

WIRED: The Tricky Aftermath of Source Code Leaks

WIRED: The Tricky Aftermath of Source Code Leaks. “Businesses, governments, and other institutions have been plagued by ransomware attacks, business email compromise, and an array other breaches in recent years. Researchers say, though, that while source code leaks may seem catastrophic, and certainly aren’t good, they typically aren’t the worst-case scenario of a criminal data breach.”

U.S. Copyright Office: Copyright Office Launches New Copyright Claims Board Website

U.S. Copyright Office: Copyright Office Launches New Copyright Claims Board Website. “Today, April 7, 2022, the U.S. Copyright Office launched ccb.gov, a website serving as a gateway to the first copyright small-claims tribunal in the United States, the Copyright Claims Board (CCB)…. The website is the new online home of the CCB and is focused on helping everyone understand the mission and the processes of the CCB. Once the CCB starts hearing claims later this spring, ccb.gov will become the primary location for information about filing and responding to claims, opting out of a proceeding, accessing the CCB’s Handbook, and contacting the CCB with questions.”

Creative Commons: CC publishes policy paper titled Towards Better Sharing of Cultural Heritage — An Agenda for Copyright Reform

Creative Commons: CC publishes policy paper titled Towards Better Sharing of Cultural Heritage — An Agenda for Copyright Reform. “Over the past few months, members of the Creative Commons (CC) Copyright Platform along with CC friends from around the world have worked together to develop a policy paper addressing the key high-level policy issues affecting access and sharing of cultural heritage, notably by galleries, libraries, archives and museums (GLAMs). In this blog post, we provide some background on the paper and share a few highlights. “

USPTO: USPTO delays the effective date for identity verification requirement for trademark filers

USPTO: USPTO delays the effective date for identity verification requirement for trademark filers. “USPTO strives to ensure the tools utilized to verify trademark filers are equitable, inclusive, and secure. Accordingly, as the USPTO evaluates and solicits feedback on our online digital identity verification option, we are announcing that we are postponing the April 9 effective date upon which identity verification was scheduled to become mandatory. A new effective date will be announced at the appropriate time with reasonable advance notice.”

The Verge: Inside The Fight To Save Video Game History

The Verge: Inside The Fight To Save Video Game History. “As games age and as companies continue to remove the means to properly purchase and download them, people are looking at other, less than legitimate options to continue to play the games they enjoy. It’s created tension between players and companies. While it’s unrealistic to expect publishers to maintain their prolific libraries in perpetuity, it’s also not ideal that large swathes of games can, at any time, just disappear on the whims of the store operator. So how can we ensure that older games can be enjoyed by future generations without the expense of maintaining aging digital infrastructure or violating existing copyright laws? Video game preservationists are doing the work at the intersection between these two points.”

Techdirt: Ukrainian Soldier Moves To Trademark ‘Russian Warship, Go Fuck Yourself” Because Of Course

Techdirt: Ukrainian Soldier Moves To Trademark ‘Russian Warship, Go Fuck Yourself” Because Of Course. “You may recall the name Roman Gribov. He was one of several soldiers stationed on Snake Island in the Black Sea. When Russian warships began their part of the assualt of their sovereign neighbor, those warships communicated with Gribov, demanding that he and his fellow soldiers surrender. While staring down the barrel of the Russian Navy, Gribov offered up what is now an iconic response: ‘Russian warship… go fuck yourself!’ From there, the rebuttal took on meme status…. Which perhaps partially explains why Gribov, thorugh his family, is attempting to trademark the now iconic verbal middle finger.