Hollywood Reporter: Marvel Suing to Keep Rights to ‘Avengers’ Characters From Copyright Termination

Hollywood Reporter: Marvel Suing to Keep Rights to ‘Avengers’ Characters From Copyright Termination. “Disney’s Marvel unit is suing to hold on to full control of Avengers characters including Iron Man, Spider-Man, Dr. Strange, Ant-Man, Hawkeye, Black Widow, Falcon, Thor and others. The complaints, which The Hollywood Reporter has obtained, come against the heirs of some late comic book geniuses including Stan Lee, Steve Ditko and Gene Colan. The suits seek declaratory relief that these blockbuster characters are ineligible for copyright termination as works made for hire. If Marvel loses, Disney would have to share ownership of characters worth billions.”

New York Times: Those Fancy Cars He Flaunted on YouTube? A $30 Million Fraud Scheme Paid for Them, U.S. Says

New York Times: Those Fancy Cars He Flaunted on YouTube? A $30 Million Fraud Scheme Paid for Them, U.S. Says. “On Wednesday, federal prosecutors said that they had charged Omi, whose real name is Bill Omar Carrasquillo, and two of his associates, in a scheme that involved illegally selling copyrighted video content to thousands of subscribers on Mr. Carrasquillo’s own online service, which was called, at various times, Reboot, Gears TV, Reloaded and Gears Reloaded.”

Flickr Blog: A Look at Nearly Two Decades of Creative Commons Licenses on Flickr

Flickr Blog: A Look at Nearly Two Decades of Creative Commons Licenses on Flickr. “The Creative Commons licenses were added to Flickr in 2004, two years after the nonprofit Creative Commons released its first set of copyright licenses. As of September 2021, nearly two decades after their introduction, Flickr has the honor of being home to more than 500 million Creative Commons licensed works, making Flickr one of the largest repositories of openly licensed works online. Today, as part of the year-long celebration of the 20th anniversary of the Creative Commons, we’ve compiled some data related to how Flickr members use Creative Commons licenses.”

New Yorker: The Surprisingly Big Business of Library E-books

New Yorker: The Surprisingly Big Business of Library E-books. “Libraries can buy print books in bulk from any seller that they choose, and, thanks to a legal principle called the first-sale doctrine, they have the right to lend those books to any number of readers free of charge. But the first-sale doctrine does not apply to digital content. For the most part, publishers do not sell their e-books or audiobooks to libraries—they sell digital distribution rights to third-party venders, such as OverDrive, and people like Steve Potash sell lending rights to libraries.”

Techdirt: Mystery Over Fake Section 1201 Takedown Claims Sent By ‘Video Industry Association of America’ Deepens

Techdirt: Mystery Over Fake Section 1201 Takedown Claims Sent By ‘Video Industry Association of America’ Deepens. “The Section 1201 DMCA notices have continued to flood Google, but now they are being supposedly sent directly by the Video Industry Association of America, with whoever is sending these dropping the pretense that they’re coming from the US Copyright Office. But that isn’t actually clearing much up other than to highlight, again, that the organization doesn’t actually exist and is coming from Russia.”

Prospect: How intellectual property laws zapped the comic creatives

Prospect: How intellectual property laws zapped the comic creatives . “To understand the comics industry today—and indeed the derived films, television and video game spin-offs—perhaps requires an understanding of the law more than lore. What can be done with characters and storylines is strictly regulated by an intricate and lucrative system of permissions and licences. This dominance of law is not new; legal issues have dominated from the very beginning of superhero comics in the 1930s, because of the very nature of the creative and commercial process.”

University of Exeter: Giving performers copyright over their work could protect them from deepfake technology, study shows

University of Exeter: Giving performers copyright over their work could protect them from deepfake technology, study shows. “Regulating the abusive use of deepfake technology is challenging because it was unforeseen by intellectual property policy-makers at the time current laws were designed. Currently performers are legally entitled to control the records made of their work, but this doesn’t apply to digital impersonation such as those generated by deepfakes. New research by Dr Mathilde Pavis, from the University of Exeter Law School, suggests existing performers’ legal rights should be reformed, so they have copyright over their performances instead.”

New York Times: Locast, a nonprofit streaming service for local TV, is shutting down

New York Times: Locast, a nonprofit streaming service for local TV, is shutting down. “Locast, a nonprofit streaming service that piped local broadcast signals over the internet, is shutting down after a federal judge ruled against the organization in a rare case tackling the legality of network content delivered online. The organization said it was ‘suspending operations, effective immediately,’ and it added that Locast was meant to “operate in accordance with the strict letter of the law,” but had to comply with the ruling, with which it disagreed.”

Legal Cheek: Museums legal threats to Pornhub are an ‘exhibition of hypocrisy’

Legal Cheek: Museums legal threats to Pornhub are an ‘exhibition of hypocrisy’. “As Burcu Günay points out, throughout history museums have progressed from merely exhibiting collections to being centres for observation, learning and questioning. Attempts to restrict access to these culturally important artworks goes against this trend. It also contravenes the values espoused by International Council of Museums (ICOM), where both France and Italy are influential. Although debate has recently become fraught over the extent to which museums should play an active role in society, the ICOM agrees that museums have a core social public function. Accessibility is therefore key to achieving these goals.”