The Register: UN’s freedom of expression top dog slams European copyright plans

The Register: UN’s freedom of expression top dog slams European copyright plans . “The campaign against a key aspect of new European copyright legislation has picked up a significant backer: the United Nations’ freedom of expression expert. David Kaye, the UN Special Rapporteur, has sent a lengthy letter to the European Commission outlining his concerns about Article 13 of the Copyright in the Digital Single Market Directive, which would require large internet platforms to introduce automated upload filters that remove copyrighted content.”

TorrentFreak: Yandex and Google Put on Notice Over ‘Pirate’ Search Results

TorrentFreak: Yandex and Google Put on Notice Over ‘Pirate’ Search Results. “Russia’s most powerful entertainment producers and distributors have written to Yandex, the country’s leading search provider, demanding the removal of ‘pirate’ sites from search results. The letter, signed by movie, music, and TV bosses, demands both detection and deletion of content. According to one of the signatories, Google will receive the same letter.”

Ars Technica: Inventor says Google is patenting work he put in the public domain

Ars Technica: Inventor says Google is patenting work he put in the public domain. “When Jarek Duda invented an important new compression technique called asymmetric numeral systems (ANS) a few years ago, he wanted to make sure it would be available for anyone to use. So instead of seeking patents on the technique, he dedicated it to the public domain. Since 2014, Facebook, Apple, and Google have all created software based on Duda’s breakthrough. But now Google is seeking a patent that would give it broad rights over the use of ANS for video compression. And Duda, a computer scientist at Jagiellonian University in Poland, isn’t happy about it.”

BBC News: Copyright law could put end to net memes

BBC News: Copyright law could put end to net memes. “The Copyright Directive is an attempt to reshape copyright for the internet, in particular rebalancing the relationship between copyright holders and online platforms. Article 13 states that platform providers should ‘take measures to ensure the functioning of agreements concluded with rights-holders for the use of their works’. Critics say this will, in effect, require all internet platforms to filter all content put online by users, which many believe would be an excessive restriction on free speech.”

VOX EU: Effects of copyrights on science

VOX EU: Effects of copyrights on science. “Copyrights grant publishers exclusive rights to content for almost a century. In science, this can involve substantial social costs by limiting who can access existing research. This column uses a unique WWII-era programme in the US, which allowed US publishers to reprint exact copies of German-owned science books, to explore how copyrights affect follow-on science. This artificial removal of copyright barriers led to a 25% decline in prices, and a 67% increase in citations. These results suggest that restrictive copyright policies slow down the progress of science considerably.”

Internet Archive: The ACCESS to Recordings Act is the Right Way to Fix Music Copyright

Internet Archive: The ACCESS to Recordings Act is the Right Way to Fix Music Copyright. “Senator Wyden (D-OR) has introduced a common sense bill to fix a bad mistake made by Congress in the 1970s as an alternative to the bad bill Congress is currently considering. The Accessibility for Curators, Creators, Educators, Scholars, and Society (ACCESS) to Recordings Act would extend full federal copyright to sound recordings created before 1972–works that currently only have state law protection.”

The Verge: Google’s Selfish Ledger ideas can also be found in its patent applications

The Verge: Google’s Selfish Ledger ideas can also be found in its patent applications. “I trust by now we’ve all seen and been at least a little disturbed by The Selfish Ledger, the nearly 9-minute-long concept video from inside Google’s ‘moonshot factory’ X labs. In the wake of it becoming public this week, Google quickly disavowed the video, claiming it was just a thought experiment ‘not related to any current or future products.’ And yet, the company’s patent applications exhibit a mode of thinking that runs at least in parallel, if not on the exact same tracks, as The Selfish Ledger’s total data collection proposal.”