Washington Post: U.S. probing how American electronics wound up in Russian military gear

Washington Post: U.S. probing how American electronics wound up in Russian military gear. “Federal agents have begun questioning U.S. technology companies on how their computer chips ended up in Russian military equipment recovered in Ukraine. Commerce Department agents who enforce export controls are conducting the inquiries together with the FBI, paying joint visits to companies to ask about Western chips and components found in Russian radar systems, drones, tanks, ground-control equipment and littoral ships, according to people familiar with the matter, who spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss sensitive investigations.”

Yale School of Management: Over 1,000 Companies Have Curtailed Operations in Russia—But Some Remain

Yale School of Management: Over 1,000 Companies Have Curtailed Operations in Russia—But Some Remain. “Over 1,000 companies have publicly announced they are voluntarily curtailing operations in Russia to some degree beyond the bare minimum legally required by international sanctions — but some companies have continued to operate in Russia undeterred. Originally a simple ‘withdraw’ vs. ‘remain’ list, our list of companies now consists of five categories—graded on a school-style letter grade scale of A-F for the completeness of withdrawal.”

Baltic Times: Freely available sanctions screening tool for international businesses was launched

Baltic Times: Freely available sanctions screening tool for international businesses was launched. “Updated daily, the consolidated database of key sanctions lists… includes items subject to sanctions by the United States, the United Nations, the European Union and the United Kingdom. It is a fuzzy search engine for finding entities on the financial sanctions lists, even if there are mistakes, omissions or swapped words in the search box. The number of queries for screening on this platform is unlimited, and answers are provided within seconds.”

Ars Technica: Shanghai’s plan to reboot the supply chain will hit workers the hardest

Ars Technica: Shanghai’s plan to reboot the supply chain will hit workers the hardest. “…the central government in Beijing has made it a priority to restart Shanghai’s industrial sector. Liu He, the Chinese vice premier, announced this week that the government would aim to stabilize the country’s supply chain by helping 666 companies in COVID-ravaged Shanghai reboot their operations. Doing that while the city continues to battle China’s worst COVID outbreak since the pandemic began may prove an enormous challenge—and may not succeed in curbing the disruption that the global supply chain could feel for weeks or months to come.”

Tater Tragedy: McDonald’s Philippines halts sales of large fries due to potato shortage (Coconuts Manila)

Coconuts Manila: Tater Tragedy: McDonald’s Philippines halts sales of large fries due to potato shortage. “If you’ve recently left a McDonald’s counter frustrated and clueless as to why they’re out of larger french fry sizes, then the fast food chain has some answers: McDonald’s Philippines has announced that the global shipping crisis has caused a shortage of their beloved french fries.”

Renovated Mazda Museum Grand Reopening in May: New virtual museum opening today (Mazda)

Mazda Newsroom: Renovated Mazda Museum Grand Reopening in May: New virtual museum opening today. “Due to open to the public on May 23 this year, the museum’s spatial design and displays have seen a complete makeover with the aim to provide customers and people in the community with a space in which they can grow closer to Mazda, as well as to strengthen the Museum’s role as a base for communication of the Mazda brand. Additionally, an online Mazda Museum was launched today on our official website to allow many more visitors to browse through the museum’s displays.”

New York Times: Supply Chain Hurdles Will Outlast Pandemic, White House Says

New York Times: Supply Chain Hurdles Will Outlast Pandemic, White House Says. “The coronavirus pandemic and its ripple effects have snarled supply chains around the world, contributing to shipping backlogs, product shortages and the fastest inflation in decades. But in a report released Thursday, White House economists argue that while the pandemic exposed vulnerabilities in the supply chain, it didn’t create them — and they warned that the problems won’t go away when the pandemic ends.”

New York Times: Lockdowns in China Block Truck Shipments and Close Factories

New York TImes: Lockdowns in China Block Truck Shipments and Close Factories. “China’s mounting Covid-19 restrictions are creating further disruptions to global supply chains for consumer electronics, car parts and other goods. A growing number of Chinese cities are requiring truck drivers to take daily Covid P.C.R. tests before allowing them to cross municipal borders or are quarantining drivers deemed to be at risk of infection. The measures have limited how quickly drivers can move components among factories and goods from plants to ports.”

Engadget: Whistleblower says Microsoft spent millions on bribes abroad

Engadget: Whistleblower says Microsoft spent millions on bribes abroad. “In an essay published Friday on the whistleblower platform Lioness, former Microsoft manager Yasser Elabd alleged that Microsoft fired him after he alerted leadership to a workplace where employees, subcontractors and government operators regularly engaged in bribery. He further alleges that attempts to escalate his concerns resulted in retaliation within Microsoft by managers, and eventual termination from his role.”

Gulf Times: MoCI launches Qatar Business Map portal

Gulf Times: MoCI launches Qatar Business Map portal. “The business map portal provides a comprehensive database for users, allowing them to view the investment advantages of Qatar’s various regions through a search service for commercial establishments per region, and for the various available commercial activities. The portal also offers statistics on several commercial licenses registered in each municipality, new and signed-off commercial licences, and the latest commercial establishments registered in Qatar.”

These Companies Have Left Russia: The List Across Tech, Entertainment, Finance (CNET)

CNET: These Companies Have Left Russia: The List Across Tech, Entertainment, Finance. “As the Russia’s war on Ukraine continues, a growing number of companies have said they are stopping sales of products and services in Russia. This will make items, including video games, iPhones and the PS5, harder to get in Russia…. Here’s a look at tech, entertainment and finance companies that have stopped sales or other services in Russia.”

The Manufacturer: Real-time online sanctions tracker launched to help manufacturing businesses

The Manufacturer: Real-time online sanctions tracker launched to help manufacturing businesses. “The dynamic tool is free to use and covers US, EU and UK sanctions against companies and individuals, dual-use goods, and specifically sanctioned goods. Unlike other static sanctions trackers in the market, the real-time sanctions tracker aggregates data directly from a range of global government sources, including UN, EU and UK dual-use goods lists, the UN, US and EU Consolidated Screening Lists, and US Sanctions List (OFAC), among others, before presenting the information in a dynamic, searchable database.”

China lockdowns: The economic cost of a zero-Covid policy (BBC)

BBC: China lockdowns: The economic cost of a zero-Covid policy. “If you’re buying something online there’s a very good chance it was made in Shenzhen – a city of 17.5 million in the south east where roughly half of all China’s online retail exporters are based. So, when Shenzhen went into a six-day lockdown on Sunday after a massive surge in Covid cases, it sent shockwaves through the world’s businesses.”