The National Interest: Why Cyberattacks on America’s Elections and Infrastructure Are Here to Stay

The National Interest: Why Cyberattacks on America’s Elections and Infrastructure Are Here to Stay. “Nations have been in the business of interfering in other nations’ elections since the beginning of recorded history. Since cyber-meddling in other countries’ electoral processes is also now well established, and there appear to be a variety of means and incentives to engage in cyber-meddling, what, if anything, can be done to discourage it? Imposing sanctions on Russia has not proven to be particularly effective, illustrating the relative powerlessness countries have to keep other countries from engaging in cyber-election meddling. Doing so could be rendered somewhat less effective by seeking to reduce or counter its influence on electoral debates by swiftly exposing and/or ignoring them. That is largely what occurred during the 2017 French election.”

Tehran Times: Iran, Hungary libraries sign MOU

Tehran Times: Iran, Hungary libraries sign MOU . “The MOU [Memorandum Of Understanding] was inked by Istvan Monok, the director general of the Hungarian library, and INLA deputy director Fariborz Khosravi, the INLA announced on Tuesday. Based on the MOU, the two sides agreed to begin joint cooperation to establish an online database to introduce the cultural heritage of the two countries, and also to exchange experts.”

The Atlantic: Social Media Is Revolutionizing Warfare

The Atlantic: Social Media Is Revolutionizing Warfare. “‘The exponential explosion of publicly available information is changing the global intelligence system … It’s changing how we tool, how we organize, how we institutionalize—everything we do.’ This is what a former high-level intelligence official told us back in the summer of 2016, explaining how the people who collect secrets—professional spies—were adjusting to a world increasingly without secrets. We were asking him about one of the most important changes in technology and politics today: the rising power of social media. “

North Korea: Operatives exploited Facebook, LinkedIn, other social media sites to get money and dodge sanctions (Boing Boing)

Boing Boing: North Korea: Operatives exploited Facebook, LinkedIn, other social media sites to get money and dodge sanctions. “An investigation by reporters at the Wall Street Journal uncovered North Korean online military operatives who used fake personas on Facebook, LinkedIn, and other social sites to generate income and evade U.S. sanctions.”

Central Asia: Database tracks authoritarians’ long arm (Eurasianet)

Not new, but new-to-me. Eurasianet: Central Asia: Database tracks authoritarians’ long arm. “The database, now in its second edition, draws on publicly available information, such as media reports and archives. It currently includes 255 individuals, among them former regime insiders, secular opposition figures, banned clerics, alleged religious extremists, journalists, civil society activists and relatives of exiled individuals who have been persecuted for the actions of family members.”

FBI: The FBI Launches a Combating Foreign Influence Webpage

FBI: The FBI Launches a Combating Foreign Influence Webpage. “Today the FBI is launching a webpage on combating foreign influence. This information is provided to educate the public about the threats faced from disinformation campaigns, cyber attacks, and the overall impact of foreign influence on society. The FBI is the lead federal agency responsible for investigating foreign influence operations.”

BuzzFeed News: No Big Deal, Just A US President Telling A Former Russian President He Needs To Eat More

BuzzFeed News: No Big Deal, Just A US President Telling A Former Russian President He Needs To Eat More. “As the US–Russia relationship continues to twist and turn, documents declassified on Thursday show just how much the position of the two countries has — and hasn’t — changed. Ties between the two countries have been among the issues dominating Donald Trump’s first term, with everything from accusations of election meddling to tussling over Ukraine and Syria. No one knows exactly what the relationship between Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin is really like — when the two met in Helsinki in July there was no one else, except for translators, in the room. Things weren’t always so informal. Previous presidents kept meticulous records, and on Thursday a host of those files, from the presidency of Bill Clinton, were released.”