Cosmopolitan no more: Russians feel sting of cultural and economic rift (The Guardian)

The Guardian: Cosmopolitan no more: Russians feel sting of cultural and economic rift. “Three months into the war, Russia has become the most sanctioned country in the world, and almost 1,000 foreign brands – the majority of them voluntarily – have curtailed their operations there, according to records kept by the Yale School of Management. The exodus of companies continued this week with McDonald’s officially announcing it would leave Russia after three decades.”

The Diplomat: How the War in Ukraine is Accelerating India’s Desire for Tech Autonomy

The Diplomat: How the War in Ukraine is Accelerating India’s Desire for Tech Autonomy. “In India, Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has stipulated a loss of trust in both Russian and Western sources of technology as well as a new alertness over any major technological dependence on one partner country. New Delhi’s reinforced belief in self-reliance, or Atmanirbhar Bharat, might in the short run compromise its economic growth, but India’s domestic consensus for technological strategic autonomy is here to stay.”

Prishtina Insight: Website Presents Better Side of Serbian-Albanian Relations

Prishtina Insight: Website Presents Better Side of Serbian-Albanian Relations. “Despite the historically tense relations between Kosovo and Serbia, the new website, ‘Serbian-Albanian Friendship’, focuses on the good sides of this complex relationship. The website is in three languages: Serbian, Albanian and English, and the content mainly comprises material on friendships between Albanians and Serbs, in order to improve relations and cooperate with each other.”

Lieber Institute West Point: Ukraine Symposium – The Ukraine Conflict And The Future Of Digital Cultural Property

Lieber Institute West Point: Ukraine Symposium – The Ukraine Conflict And The Future Of Digital Cultural Property. “Various international instruments explicitly provide for the protection of cultural property in armed conflict. As conceived, the law was formulated to protect physical works from damage or destruction in war. Events in Ukraine, however, have demonstrated that armed conflict can endanger digital material as well. Some digital creations might even qualify as a digital form of cultural property—that is, digital cultural property. Given the growing prevalence of digital material and the threat posed to all forms of cultural works in war, how should States approach their legal obligation to protect digital cultural property in the event of armed conflict?”

USC Center on Public Diplomacy: Why Russia Is Losing The Information War

USC Center on Public Diplomacy: Why Russia Is Losing The Information War . “Given Russia’s apparent preeminence in information warfare, taking control of Ukraine seemed well within the Kremlin’s grasp. This year, as its troops massed along the Russia-Ukraine border, Russia’s information attacks were relentless, claiming that Ukraine was riddled with corruption, was run by Nazis, and was not really a nation. Once again, with this messaging as a foundation, Russia rolled into Ukraine. Despite its past successes, Russia’s information strategy did not work this time. The reason, in a word: pushback.”

StopFake: Russia-Ukraine War through the Prism of Mass Communications

StopFake: Russia-Ukraine War through the Prism of Mass Communications. “Ukraine’s struggle for independence from Russia has become truly global from the perspective of mass communications. This war is universally covered in the world media. It is extremely visible. It is a war that demands the expression of public judgment, thus becoming a point of political identification. The current confrontation between Russian and Ukrainian media discourses is not an ordinary clash of warring parties propaganda rhetoric. In this war, Western civilization is searching for an answer to a question of utmost importance: can it withstand within its own value framework – or is it no longer able to do so.”

The Mayor: Czechia helps Ukraine preserve its endangered cultural heritage

The Mayor: Czechia helps Ukraine preserve its endangered cultural heritage. “Yesterday morning, two trucks filled with packaging, bubble wrap, polyethylene foams and other materials left the National Museum in Prague and set off to Ukraine. According to the museum, this consignment of materials was commissioned by the Czech Ministry of Culture to help Ukraine preserve its endangered cultural heritage, monuments, and artworks.”

Fueling Secession, Promising Bitcoins: How a Russian Operator Urged Catalonian Leaders to Break With Madrid (OCCRP)

OCCRP: Fueling Secession, Promising Bitcoins: How a Russian Operator Urged Catalonian Leaders to Break With Madrid. “On a trip to Barcelona in 2017, Nikolai Sadovnikov offered to give the Catalonians $500 billion to aid their attempts to make the region an independent state. In return, he asked them to turn Catalonia into a haven for cryptocurrencies.”

Update: Yandex seeks new electricity contract as Finland data center runs on diesel (Data Center Dynamics)

Data Center Dynamics: Update: Yandex seeks new electricity contract as Finland data center runs on diesel. “The 40MW facility in Mäntsälä, Finland, was cut off on 25 April because Yandex’s electricity contract had run out, according to local news services. The data center appears to be running at reduced capacity on its diesel generators and is putting little or no heat into the district heating system, which is now being fed using light fuel oil and natural gas, according to Nivos.”

From comedian to wartime leader: How President Zelenskyy is helping Ukraine win the information war (ABC News)

ABC News: From comedian to wartime leader: How President Zelenskyy is helping Ukraine win the information war. “LONDON — Just after the Russian invasion of Ukraine began, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy was offered the chance by the U.S. government to leave the city of Kyiv for his own safety. What he is said to have responded has come to embody the defiance of the former comedic actor turned wartime leader: ‘The fight is here,’ he reportedly said, ‘I need ammunition, not a ride.’”

CNET: US Pledges to Keep an Open Internet With Dozens of Other Countries

CNET: US Pledges to Keep an Open Internet With Dozens of Other Countries. “The United States, along with 60 other countries and partners, have pledged to keep an open internet in the face of ‘rising digital authoritarianism’, the White House said in a statement Thursday. The Declaration for the Future of the Internet includes commitments to protecting human rights, making internet connections ‘inclusive and affordable,’ and promoting the free flow of information.”

The Times: Italy offers to rebuild Mariupol theatre and save Ukraine’s cultural heritage

The Times: Italy offers to rebuild Mariupol theatre and save Ukraine’s cultural heritage. “Italy has offered to rebuild Mariupol’s theatre, a symbol of the wanton destruction of war, and to provide the assistance of its ‘monuments men’ to protect Ukraine’s artistic heritage. The offer to rebuild the Donetsk Regional Drama Theatre, where as many as 300 people may have died, was made last month by Dario Franceschini, Italy’s culture minister.”

Call Russia: UK volunteers phone random Russian numbers to ‘plant seed of doubt’ about Ukraine war (iNews)

iNews: Call Russia: UK volunteers phone random Russian numbers to ‘plant seed of doubt’ about Ukraine war. “These ‘phone calls to end the war’ are part of Call Russia, a volunteer network of more than 30,000 people from around 116 countries dialling into Russian homes to speak directly about war in Ukraine. It’s the brainchild of 45-year-old Paulius Senuta, the Lithuanian CEO of Not Perfect Companies who has experience working across Russia, Lithuania, Estonia, Belarus and Kazakhstan.”