BetaNews: Cloudflare and the Internet Archive are working together to help make the web more reliable

BetaNews: Cloudflare and the Internet Archive are working together to help make the web more reliable. “The Wayback Machine has been archiving much of the web for over 20 years now and has cached 468 billion pages to date, with more than a billion new URLs being added every day. As part of this new tie up, sites that make use of Cloudflare’s Always Online service will have their content automatically archived, and if the original host isn’t available, then the Internet Archive will step in to provide the pages.”

Internet Archive Blog: How the Internet Archive is Ensuring Permanent Access to Open Access Journal Articles

Internet Archive Blog: How the Internet Archive is Ensuring Permanent Access to Open Access Journal Articles. “Open Access journals, such as New Theology Review (ISSN: 0896-4297) and Open Journal of Hematology (ISSN: 2075-907X), made their research articles available for free online for years. With a quick click or a simple query, students anywhere in the world could access their articles, and diligent Wikipedia editors could verify facts against original articles on vitamin deficiency and blood donation. But some journals, such as these titles, are no longer available from the publisher’s websites, and are only available through the Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine. Since 2017, the Internet Archive joined others in concentrating on archiving all scholarly literature and making it permanently accessible.”

The Nation: Publishers Are Taking the Internet to Court

The Nation: Publishers Are Taking the Internet to Court. “The trial is set for next year in federal court, with initial disclosures for discovery scheduled to take place next week. The publishers’ ‘prayer for relief’ seeks to destroy the Open Library’s existing books, and to soak the Internet Archive for a lot of money; in their response, the Archive is looking to have its opponents’ claims denied in full, its legal costs paid, and “such other and further relief as the Court deems just and equitable.” But what’s really at stake in this lawsuit is the idea of ownership itself—what it means not only for a library but for anyone to own a book.”

Internet Archive Blog: Judge Sets Tentative Trial Date for November 2021

Internet Archive Blog: Judge Sets Tentative Trial Date for November 2021. “This week, a federal judge issued this scheduling order, laying out the road map that may lead to a jury trial in the copyright lawsuit brought by four of the world’s largest publishers against the Internet Archive. Judge John G. Koeltl has ordered all parties to be ready for trial by November 12, 2021. He set a deadline of December 1, 2020, to notify the court if the parties are willing to enter settlement talks with a magistrate judge.”

Internet Archive: The Legend of GayBlade

Internet Archive: The Legend of GayBlade. “The recently released video game documentary High Score includes a sequence in the third episode about a game called GayBlade. GayBlade is one of the first commercially-sold LGTBQ-themed video games, a role-playing romp for Windows and Macintosh occasionally referred to as ‘Dungeons and Drag Queens’. Once thought to have been lost, the game’s software was recently discovered and preserved—and is now available in the Internet Archive!”

Publishers Weekly: Publishers, Internet Archive Propose Yearlong Discovery Plan for Copyright Case

Publishers Weekly: Publishers, Internet Archive Propose Yearlong Discovery Plan for Copyright Case. “In a joint filing last week, attorneys for the Internet Archive and four publishers suing for copyright infringement proposed a discovery plan for the case that would extend for more than a year. The filing, known as a rule 26(f) report, lays out a potential road map for the case that would begin with the first proposed deadline for initial fact disclosures on September 11, 2020, and would conclude with expert depositions due by September 20, 2021.”

Internet Archive Blog: Can You Help us Make the 19th Century Searchable?

Internet Archive Blog: Can You Help us Make the 19th Century Searchable?. “What we need is ‘Culture Tech’ (a riff on fintech, or biotech) and Culture Techies to work on important and useful projects–the things we need, but are probably not going to get gushers of private equity interest to fund. There are thousands of professionals taking on similar challenges in the field of digital humanities and we want to complement their work with industrial-scale tech that we can apply to cultural heritage materials.”

DeseretNews: Internet archivists have remastered MTV’s first broadcast. Will it get taken down?

DeseretNews: Internet archivists have remastered MTV’s first broadcast. Will it get taken down?. “Back in May, members of the Internet Archive, a nonprofit online library, uploaded a massive amount of early MTV broadcasts from 1981 to 1991. It didn’t last long, as the content was taken down, likely for copyright reasons. An anonymous Internet Archive user is giving it another try. The user recently uploaded remastered audio and video of the first four hours of MTV — which originally aired on Aug. 1, 1981.”

Internet Archive: An Archive of a Different Type

Internet Archive, and this one is a real wow: An Archive of a Different Type . “Imagine being so well-known for your craft that letters addressed to ‘Mr. Typewriter, New York’ would get delivered by the Post Office to your door. Imagine you mount a letter wrong while crafting a typewriter, and it causes a country (Burma) to change that letter to accommodate your mistake. Or that, through decades, your expert testimony about the accuracy of a brand of typewriter and the characters it types means the difference between guilt, incarceration, freedom or the swapping of fortunes. Such was the life of Pearl and Martin Tytell, of Tytell Typewriter. From a shop on Fulton Street of NYC from 1938 to 2000, the couple oversaw not just endless consultations and repairs, but fabrications and projects that were revolutions in themselves.”

Search for Sound: A New Feature on Internet Archive (Data Horde)

Data Horde: Search for Sound: A New Feature on Internet Archive. “If you’ve been browsing the Internet Archive recently, you might have noticed a new search option called ‘Search radio transcripts’. You can now search through radio broadcasts as if looking up something in a book, it’s pretty neat!”

Jurist: Libraries Are Not a Crime

Jurist: Libraries Are Not a Crime. “There is nothing wrong with being a landlord, and there is nothing wrong with collecting rent. But there is nothing particularly special or morally compelling about it, either. If copyright owners want to complain about the [National Emergency Library], let them do it as landlords, and let us see their arguments as landlord arguments. After all, unlike real landlords, they aren’t even objecting to the loss of actual income on a property they are maintaining. Literary landlords object to the possibility they might not collect every possible rent on a literary property they created or purchased long ago. Maybe we should feel sorry for them? I will confess, my sympathy is limited.”

TorrentFreak: Google Takes No Action for 99.2% of Copyright Notices Targeting Internet Archive

TorrentFreak: Google Takes No Action for 99.2% of Copyright Notices Targeting Internet Archive. “Copyright holders and anti-piracy groups might want to consider best use of their resources when sending takedown notices to Google targeting the Internet Archive. According to data published by Google, 99.2% of complaints against IA result in ‘no action taken’, with just 0.1% of complaints resulting in some kind of takedown.”

Motherboard: Internet Archives Fires Back in Lawsuit Over Covid-19 Emergency Library

Motherboard: Internet Archives Fires Back in Lawsuit Over Covid-19 Emergency Library. “In a brief filed in a New York district court on Tuesday night, the Internet Archive fired back in response to a lawsuit brought against it by five of the world’s largest publishers. The lawsuit seeks to shut down an online National Emergency Library started by the Internet Archive during the Covid-19 pandemic and levy millions of dollars in fines against the organization.”

Kotaku: Hundreds Of Unreleased Prototype Games Are Playable For Free

Kotaku: Hundreds Of Unreleased Prototype Games Are Playable For Free. “Hundreds of prototypes of some of the most iconic games — Double Dragon, Street Fighter 2, Mega Man 3, AKIRA, Prince of Persia, Dr. Mario, NBA JAM, Killer Instinct and much more — have been uploaded to the Internet Archive and are now accessible to all.”

The Block: Arweave aims to make the Internet Archive’s data accessible forever

The Block: Arweave aims to make the Internet Archive’s data accessible forever. “The Internet Archive is a non-profit library of digital content, ranging from websites to music and even software. But this ‘amazing resource’ is also ‘fundamentally centralized,’ says Sam Williams, Arweave’s founder. So, Arweave’s developers are adding torrents — files that can be distributed and accessible via a peer-to-peer network — to Arweave’s ‘next-generation archive.'”