The Next Web: The Wayback Machine can now highlight changes in copy on websites

The Next Web: The Wayback Machine can now highlight changes in copy on websites. “The new feature, called ‘Changes,’ lets you compare two different archives of a given URL. It gives a side-by-side comparison, with changes highlighted in blue (added content) and yellow (deleted content).” ooo!

Boston Public Library’s 78rpm Records Come to the Internet: Reformatting the Boston Public Library Sound Archives (Internet Archive)

Internet Archive: Boston Public Library’s 78rpm Records Come to the Internet: Reformatting the Boston Public Library Sound Archives. “Following eighteen months of work, more than 50,000 78rpm record ‘sides’ from the Boston Public Library’s sound archives have now been digitized and made freely available online by the Internet Archive.” I listened to a Cab Calloway song from 1946 (“Hey Now, Hey Now” if you care) and while it did have pops and crackles I was surprised at how good the sound quality was.

Archive-It Blog: Announcing the “Pitch a Collection” Contest Winners

Archive-It Blog: Announcing the “Pitch a Collection” Contest Winners. “We are excited to introduce the winners of our first ever Pitch a Collection contest! The selected collections are as diverse as our partners and will ensure the preservation of online content from a variety of under-represented subject areas.” Ooo, you had me at Interactive Fiction Web Archive.

TechCo: 5 Tools to Help You Search the Archived Internet

TechCo: 5 Tools to Help You Search the Archived Internet . “Anything that’s low tech is dismissed as ‘from the stone age,’ but stone is by far the most stable way to record information. Not only will the hard drives and networked routers of today never last a thousand years, but plenty of information online won’t even last the decade. As local newspapers or long-in-the-tooth startups go under, they all leave dead links scattered across the internet, constantly replaced with fresh links that will themselves eventually die. Wow, sorry, didn’t mean to get too dark there. My point is, memories that you might want to keep are increasingly likely to exist only on the internet — rambling G-Chat conversations with your best friend, say, or your first WordPress blog. If you want to preserve, protect, or search through your online footprint, read on to learn which five online tools can best help you comb through the archived internet.”

Hoodline: Internet Archive To Preserve, Share Unsold ‘Recycled Records’ Inventory

Hoodline: Internet Archive To Preserve, Share Unsold ‘Recycled Records’ Inventory. “If you were worried about the loss of Recycled Records’ inventory now that owner Bruce Lyall is retiring and selling his building, fear not. As reported by CBS early this week, Lyall came to an agreement to give the collection—including some records so obscure they haven’t sold in decades—to the Internet Archive, a 21-year-old local nonprofit dedicated to preserving information and cultural artifacts.”

Bitcoin Magazine: OpenTimestamps Has Timestamped the Entire Internet Archive — Here’s How

Bitcoin Magazine: OpenTimestamps Has Timestamped the Entire Internet Archive — Here’s How. “OpenTimestamps, a project led by Bitcoin Core developer Peter Todd, just made sure the Internet Archive cannot be forged. Well, sort of. In a blog post published last week, the developer and consultant explained how he used his OpenTimestamps project to timestamp all the Internet Archive’s 750,000,000 files onto Bitcoin’s blockchain. This means that no one — not even the Internet Archive itself — can modify this collection of books, videos, images and other records; not unnoticeably.”

Mashable: The Trump team just tried to delete old press releases because it doesn’t understand the internet

Mashable: The Trump team just tried to delete old press releases because it doesn’t understand the internet. “Trump’s team appeared to realize its mistake … so they deleted literally every last press release from Trump’s site. Check it out for yourself. The press releases are nowhere to be found. Buuuuttt … unfortunately, that’s not how the internet works. Trump’s team may have pulled the press releases from his website, but they are still available on the Wayback Machine, a project run by the Internet Archive that keeps records of the internet’s past for all to see.”