CNET: What is cheugy? And how do you know if you’re a cheug?

CNET: What is cheugy? And how do you know if you’re a cheug?. “You might have noticed the word ‘cheugy’ popping up online and wondered what it means and how to pronounce it. New slang is a surefire way to make you question your fleeting youth. In this case, that couldn’t be more true. In short, cheugy is a trendy way to say something is passe, and the word’s having a moment on TikTok, where folks are busy labeling what’s cheugy, having existential crises over being cheugy or just embracing life as a cheug.” Oh, so, like, someone who listens to disco and says “groovy” all the time?… oh. >cough

Reuters: Internet’s ‘Hide the Pain Harold’ accidentally used by Swedish COVID-19 vaccine website

Reuters: Internet’s ‘Hide the Pain Harold’ accidentally used by Swedish COVID-19 vaccine website. “A health authority in Sweden unwittingly used ‘Hide the Pain Harold’ – one of the internet’s most-recognised figures – as the face of its COVID-19 vaccination booking website, officials said on Tuesday evening, adding the image had now been removed. Harold is actually Hungarian man Andras Arato, who in 2008 and 2009 posed as a model for stock photographs.”

Arizona State University: Center on Narrative, Disinformation, and Strategic Influence to use interdisciplinary approach

Arizona State University: Center on Narrative, Disinformation, and Strategic Influence to use interdisciplinary approach . “The Global Security Initiative at Arizona State University has always focused on how disinformation influences people, and it has now dedicated a new unit to that research — the Center on Narrative, Disinformation, and Strategic Influence. The center will use an interdisciplinary method of researching disinformation campaigns and developing tools to combat them, according to Scott Ruston, a research professor who will lead the new center, housed within the Global Security Initiative.”

Boing Boing: Take a strange trip through r/QuarterLand, if you dare

Boing Boing: Take a strange trip through r/QuarterLand, if you dare. “Exploring r/QuarterLand feels like drifting off into a fever dream, one that veers into a full-on nightmare at times. The subreddit’s demented community of 4,000 people (which I admit, I am a part of) seems to have an unspoken understanding of the specific flavor of the content’s strangeness. Beware: the further one ventures through the QuarterLand page, the more they will stray from their sense of reality.”

Commentary: Social media worsens growing anti-China sentiments in Southeast Asia (Channel News Asia)

Channel News Asia: Commentary: Social media worsens growing anti-China sentiments in Southeast Asia. “It might be easy to dismiss the Milk Tea Alliance as a Gen-Z Internet joke. But the meme is successful in tapping into something deeper in the collective consciousness of a region that is famously diverse and defiant of collective action. It taps into discontent with the regional decline of democracy and fears about the rise of China as a hegemonic power. There is a bigger picture beyond the protests in Myanmar. The country fits a broader pattern of recent years in which disparate protests in Southeast Asia, triggered by different events, exhibit undercurrents of anxiety about the growing influence of China.”

NFT goldrush: A roundup of the strangest nonfungible tokens (CNET)

CNET: NFT goldrush: A roundup of the strangest nonfungible tokens. “Real digital artists are making real money on NFTs. Take Beeple. He’s a digital artist with a huge fanbase, over 1.8 million followers on Instagram. Art he sold as an NFT recently fetched $69 million in a Christie’s auction. That’s insane to you or me, but not to people who frequent Christie’s auctions, who spend $60 million on abstract expressionist paintings. But even if there is a small percentage of NFT sales you can make sense of, there are many more which are absolutely, positively nuts.”

CNN: How a year of living almost exclusively online made the internet weird again

CNN: How a year of living almost exclusively online made the internet weird again. “After several years of concerning headlines about misinformation, election meddling, filter bubbles, online harassment and more, there are flickers of a more carefree — and weird — internet. At times it felt like a throwback to a more innocent web, when Dancing Baby filled our inboxes, Second Life took on a life of its own and Rickrolling was an ever-lingering threat. And all it took was a devastating pandemic that forced many in the United States and around the world to live their lives almost exclusively online for much of the past year.”

TechCrunch: Memes for sale

TechCrunch: Memes for sale. “The creator of the Nyan Cat, Chris Torres, has organized an informal collection of meme originators — the creators or original popularizers of meme images — into a two-week-long auction of their works. Under the hashtag #memeconomy the creators of memes like Bad Luck Brian, Coughing Cat, Kitty Cat Dance, Scumbag Steve, Twerky Pepe and some others are finally finding a way to monetize the creation of genuine cultural phenomena that have been used freely for decades.”

PsyPost: The memes we read might influence how we love, study finds

PsyPost: The memes we read might influence how we love, study finds. “The prevalence and importance of social media has made the sharing of internet memes a primary method of communicating ideas today. Short and punchy, memes are pervasive and often emotionally salient, making them prime candidates for influencers of human behavior. This observation led a team of researchers to explore the influence of romantic memes on relationship beliefs. Their research is published in Psychological Studies.”

Mashable: There are two types of texters in the world. Which one are you?

Mashable: There are two types of texters in the world. Which one are you?. “Though you may not realize it, there are two types of texters in this world: those who send one detail-packed paragraph and those who use multiple messages to get their points across. Both styles have unique pros and cons, but chatting with someone who has different texting style than you isn’t always ideal.”

CNN: Sorry, millennials. The 😂 emoji isn’t cool anymore

CNN: Sorry, millennials. The 😂 emoji isn’t cool anymore. “In recent weeks, two internet-savvy generations have been clashing in videos and comments on TikTok over the hallmarks of millennial culture that are now deemed uncool by Gen Z. The list includes skinny jeans (Gen Z verdict: set them on fire), side parts (Gen Z verdict: middle part or bust) and perhaps most painful of all, the popular laughing crying emoji that some millennials, myself included, use hundreds of times a day, or more.”

Autumn Christian: The Problem with Future Nostalgia

Autumn Christian: The Problem with Future Nostalgia. “Many of us millennials seem to be mourning not just the loss of the past, but the loss of an alternate future. There’s a feeling that maybe we had a bright hope but seemed to have taken a wrong turn at some point. That’s what things like vaporwave, futurefunk, and high-resolution pixel art seem to be conveying — not just looking toward the past, but toward the future we could have, by creating something of an alternative past. An alternate world where maybe we could have moved toward the collective dream we shared.”

New York Times: Actually, QR Codes Never Went Away

New York Times: Actually, QR Codes Never Went Away. “Though QR codes have been persistently popular for payments and other services in Asia, in the United States, until recently, they were widely seen as unsexy, even a hassle. In 2015, TechCrunch called QR codes both a ‘laughingstock’ and ‘a frustrating symbol of over-engineering’ in the span of 41 words.” I love QR codes and I’m glad they’re coming back into style.