Ars Technica: CenturyLink, Frontier took FCC cash, failed to deploy all required broadband

Ars Technica: CenturyLink, Frontier took FCC cash, failed to deploy all required broadband. “CenturyLink and Frontier Communications have apparently failed to meet broadband-deployment requirements in numerous states where they are receiving government funding to expand their networks in rural areas. CenturyLink notified the Federal Communications Commission that it ‘may not have reached the deployment milestone’ in 23 states and that it hit the latest deadline in only 10 states.” Note this fail did not stop CenturyLink from winning a $1.6 billion federal contract this month.

BBC: Internet provider faces big GDPR fine for lax call centre checks

BBC: Internet provider faces big GDPR fine for lax call centre checks. “A German internet service provider faces a €9.6m ($10.6m; £8m) fine after being accused of failing to carry out tough enough customer ID checks. Germany’s data protection watchdog said anyone who called 1&1 Telecom could get extensive personal information about someone else solely by giving their name and date of birth.”

Ars Technica: ISPs lied to Congress to spread confusion about encrypted DNS, Mozilla says

Ars Technica: ISPs lied to Congress to spread confusion about encrypted DNS, Mozilla says. “Mozilla is urging Congress to reject the broadband industry’s lobbying campaign against encrypted DNS in Firefox and Chrome. The Internet providers’ fight against this privacy feature raises questions about how they use broadband customers’ Web-browsing data, Mozilla wrote in a letter sent [yesterday] to the chairs and ranking members of three House of Representatives committees.”

Ars Technica: The count of managed service providers getting hit with ransomware mounts

Ars Technica: The count of managed service providers getting hit with ransomware mounts. “When more than 20 local governments in Texas were hit this summer by ransomware in one day. The attack was apparently tracked back to one thing the organizations had in common: a managed service provider. With limited IT resources of their own, local governments have increasingly turned to MSPs to operate significant portions of their networks and applications, as have other organizations and businesses—often placing critical parts of their business operations in the MSPs’ hands. And that has made MSPs a very attractive target to ransomware operators.”

Ars Technica: FCC finally orders ISPs to say exactly where they offer broadband

Ars Technica: FCC finally orders ISPs to say exactly where they offer broadband. “The Federal Communications Commission voted today to collect more accurate data about which parts of the US have broadband and which parts lack high-speed connectivity. From now on, home Internet providers will have to give the FCC geospatial maps of where they provide service instead of merely reporting which census blocks they offer service in.”

Neowin: UK ISPs stop issuing educational copyright infringement notices

Neowin: UK ISPs stop issuing educational copyright infringement notices . “A little over two years ago, internet service providers (ISPs) began issuing educational copyright infringement notices to users suspected of engaging in digital piracy to push them towards using legal services such as Netflix and Spotify. Now, notices under the Creative Content UK (CCUK) initiative have stopped being sent to copyright infringers.”

Yahoo Finance: The FCC said repealing net-neutrality rules would help consumers: It hasn’t

Yahoo Finance: The FCC said repealing net-neutrality rules would help consumers: It hasn’t. “FCC chairman Ajit Pai repeatedly emphasized that eliminating the rules would help smaller ISPs in particular bring competition to the market. ‘They told us that these rules prevented them from extending their service because they had to spend money on lawyers and accountants,’ he said in a June 2018 statement. A year later, the bargain looks unfulfilled. Evidence remains scant of ISPs saving money from this regulatory rollback, or working to give consumers faster or better broadband options. But they also don’t seem to be using their new power, much less abusing it.”

TechSpot: Maine passes bill prohibiting ISPs from selling customer data without consent

TechSpot: Maine passes bill prohibiting ISPs from selling customer data without consent. “The state’s Senate voted unanimously to pass the bill, after the bill found similar favor in the state House. The bill, LD 946, requires ISPs to obtain consent before collecting, disclosing, selling or permitting access to customer information. LD 946 outlines exceptions where ISPs can use customer information without consent, such as honoring a court order or in case of emergency services.”

Techdirt: The Pai FCC Sits On Its Hands While Phone Companies Rip Off American Taxpayers

Techdirt: The Pai FCC Sits On Its Hands While Phone Companies Rip Off American Taxpayers. “We’ve talked often about how the nation’s phone companies, now fixated on video and online advertising, have effectively just been letting their DSL and phone networks fall apart while still charging exorbitant rates. Not only did these companies take billions in taxpayer dollars to build these older copper-based networks, they took billions more in subsidies for fiber upgrades they never fully deployed. Yet increasingly we’ve watched as they’ve refused to upgrade or even repair their networks across countless states, leaving customers trapped with expensive service that often doesn’t even meet the FCC’s standard definition of broadband (25 Mbps).”

Ars Technica: Entire broadband industry sues Vermont to stop state net neutrality law

Ars Technica: Entire broadband industry sues Vermont to stop state net neutrality law. “The nation’s largest broadband industry lobby groups have sued Vermont to stop a state law that requires ISPs to follow net neutrality principles in order to qualify for government contracts. The lawsuit was filed yesterday in US District Court in Vermont by mobile industry lobby CTIA, cable industry lobby NCTA, telco lobby USTelecom, the New England Cable & Telecommunications Association, and the American Cable Association (ACA), which represents small and mid-size cable companies.”

Techdirt: The Entire Broadband Industry Just Sued California For Daring To Protect Net Neutrality

Techdirt: The Entire Broadband Industry Just Sued California For Daring To Protect Net Neutrality. “As expected, the broadband industry filed suit against the state of California today over the state’s shiny new net neutrality law. The lawsuit (pdf), filed in US District Court for the Eastern District of California, echoes many of the same arguments made in the DOJ’s own recent lawsuit against the state.”

FCC Approves New Privacy Rules

The FCC has approved new rules to protect consumer privacy. “The rules, passed Thursday in a 3-2 vote by the Federal Communications Commission, require Internet providers, such as Comcast and Verizon, to obtain their customers’ explicit consent before using or sharing that behavioral data with third parties, such as marketing firms. Also covered by that requirement are health data, financial information, Social Security numbers and the content of emails and other digital messages.”

Bangladesh Developing Database of ISPs

The government of Bangladesh is developing a database of Internet service providers. “Bangladesh Telecommunication Regulatory Commission has issued licences to 434 internet service providers (ISPs) in six categories….Officials said apart from the authorised ISPs, a huge number of unauthorised ISPs based on the small areas in the capital and other parts of the country were offering internet services by collecting bandwidth from the licence holders. But, miscreants carry out different cyber crimes using the internet line from the unauthorised ISPs as well as cyber cafes.”