Ars Technica: Indian Supreme Court finds 150-day Internet blackout in Kashmir illegal

Ars Technica: Indian Supreme Court finds 150-day Internet blackout in Kashmir illegal. “The Indian region of Kashmir has had most Internet service blacked out since August. The government of Narendra Modi says the online blackout is a necessary security measure in the face of growing unrest in the region triggered by a change in Kashmir’s status under the Indian constitution. (Kashmir’s status within India has been a topic of controversy for decades.)… But on Friday, India’s highest court rejected the government’s rationale, arguing that the blackout violated Indian telecommunications laws.”

South China Morning Post: Internet access, social media shutdowns cost world over US$8 billion in 2019

South China Morning Post: Internet access, social media shutdowns cost world over US$8 billion in 2019. “The total economic cost of major internet access and social media shutdowns around the world topped US$8 billion last year, according to a new report, which predicted that these disruptions would continue amid ongoing political turmoil.”

The Next Web: India’s internet shutdowns have cost its businesses billions of dollars

The Next Web: India’s internet shutdowns have cost its businesses billions of dollars. “India has implemented more than 350 internet shutdowns across the country since 2014 — the most notable of which is the ongoing blackout in the erstwhile state of Jammu & Kashmir, which has already lasted 135 days (it is now active only in the Kashmir valley). The aforementioned shutdown was implemented after the Central government announced its intention to revoke Jammu & Kashmir’s special constitutional status, forcing it to abide by national legislation.”

CNET: Inside the dystopian nightmare of an internet shutdown

CNET: Inside the dystopian nightmare of an internet shutdown. “On Oct. 1, the Iraqi government pulled the plug on the country’s internet. With no warning, out it went like a light. Ever since, the internet, messaging services and social networks have flickered on and off like faulty bulbs. This is far from the first internet shutdown Iraq has suffered. But according to Hayder Hamzoz, CEO and founder of the Iraqi Network for Social Media, not since 2003 and the regime of Saddam Hussein has internet censorship been so severe.”