Slate: Preserving Today’s Internet

Slate.com: Preserving Today’s Internet. “You have a kid who goes on YouTube and looks at subway commutes, surfing his way through amateur footage of trains entering stations. Occasionally, he encounters an automatically generated recommendation that’s sketchy-looking. (You usually catch it before he can click.) His five- or 10-minute breakfast screen-time session may seem like an everyday event, but it’s also totally unique: a singular interaction of a particular human with a particular permutation of the YouTube algorithm. To Clifford Lynch, normal 2017 experiences like these are something special—something that we should think about saving.”

Defense One: Russia Will Build Its Own Internet Directory, Citing US Information Warfare

Defense One: Russia Will Build Its Own Internet Directory, Citing US Information Warfare. “The Russian government will build an “independent internet” for use by itself, Brazil, India, China, and South Africa — the so-called BRICS nations — ‘in the event of global internet malfunctions,’ the Russian news site RT reported on Tuesday. More precisely, Moscow intends to create an alternative to the global Domain Name System, or DNS, the directory that helps the browser on your computer or smartphone connect to the website server or other computer that you’re trying to reach. The Russians cited national security concerns, but the real reason may have more to do with Moscow’s own plans for offensive cyber operations.” Skip the comments.

The Register: ‘Break up Google and Facebook if you ever want innovation again’

The Register: ‘Break up Google and Facebook if you ever want innovation again’. “If the tech industry wants another wave of innovation to match the PC or the internet, Google and Facebook must be broken up, journalist and film producer Jonathan Taplin told an audience at University College London’s Faculty of Law this week. He was speaking at an event titled Crisis in Copyright Policy: How the digital monopolies have cornered culture and what it means for all of us, where he credited the clampers put on Bell then IBM for helping to create the PC industry and the internet.”

CNET: Ignored by big telecom, Detroit’s marginalized communities are building their own internet

CNET: Ignored by big telecom, Detroit’s marginalized communities are building their own internet. “Being stuck without access to the internet is often thought of as a problem only for rural America. But even in some of America’s biggest cities, a significant portion of the population can’t get online. Take Detroit, where 40 percent of the population has no access to the internet — of any kind, not only high speed — at home, according to the Federal Communications Commission. Seventy percent of school-aged children in the city are among those who have no internet access at home. Detroit has one of the most severe digital divides in the country, the FCC says.”

TechCrunch: After the end of the startup era

TechCrunch: After the end of the startup era. “Hordes of engineering and business graduates secretly dream of building the new Facebook, the new Uber, the new Airbnb. Almost every big city now boasts one or more startup accelerators, modeled after Paul Graham’s now-legendary Y Combinator. Throngs of technology entrepreneurs are reshaping, ‘disrupting,’ every aspect of our economy. Today’s big businesses are arthritic dinosaurs soon devoured by these nimble, fast-growing mammals with sharp teeth. Right Er, actually, no. That was last decade. We live in a new world now, and it favors the big, not the small. The pendulum has already begun to swing back. Big businesses and executives, rather than startups and entrepreneurs, will own the next decade; today’s graduates are much more likely to work for Mark Zuckerberg than follow in his footsteps.”

Digital Trends: Think Your ISP Is Cheating You? The Best Internet Speed Tests Help You Find Out

Digital Trends: Think Your ISP Is Cheating You? The Best Internet Speed Tests Help You Find Out. “Internet service providers like to make a lot of claims about upload and download speeds when you sign up, but do you ever wonder how those numbers compare to the speeds you’re actually getting once your connection is set up? These alternative browser-based speed tests will help you determine your upload and download speeds, as well as identify other issues with your network, such as packet loss, latency issues, or physical connection problems. Here are several of our favorite internet speed tests, each of which is dependent on the kind of data and interface you’re looking for.”

New York Times: How to Use Twitter and Facebook for Emergency Travel Information

New York Times: How to Use Twitter and Facebook for Emergency Travel Information. “The key to using Twitter and Facebook in travel emergencies is choosing the right people, groups and companies to follow. Misinformation is common. So who to trust Below, a beginner’s guide to finding the most helpful accounts.” None of the resources here are going to astonish expert searches, but it’s a great overview articles for beginners and intermediate folks.