Reuters: Kenyan museum, Mau Mau fighter shed light on British colonial abuses

Reuters: Kenyan museum, Mau Mau fighter shed light on British colonial abuses. “The camps, where tens of thousands are thought to have died, are a traumatic but largely forgotten part of Kenya’s past. They were set up to jail activists and sympathisers during the Mau Mau uprising of 1952-1960, in which [Gitu Wa] Kahengeri, born in the 1920s and a Secretary General of the independence movement’s Veterans Association, participated. Using eye-witness accounts, documents and field visits, Kenyan and British historians from the Museum of British Colonialism are now building an online archive of the period, complete with 3D recreations of some of the camps.”

Michigan State University: Social Scientists Awarded National Parks Service Grant

Michigan State University: Social Scientists Awarded National Parks Service Grant. “This grant will be used to develop The Internment Archaeology Digital Archive, an open digital archive that will host, preserve and provide broad public access to digitized collections of archaeological materials, archival documents, oral histories and ephemera that speak to the experiences of Japanese Americans incarcerated during World War II in the United States.”

Rafu Shimpo: Northeastern Illinois University Expands JA Redress Collection with Newly Digitized Videos

Rafu Shimpo: Northeastern Illinois University Expands JA Redress Collection with Newly Digitized Videos. “Northeastern Illinois University’s Ronald Williams Library has added newly digitized video footage of the 1981 Commission on the Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians (CWRIC) hearings to its Japanese American Redress Collection.”

Sierra Sun Times: National Park Service Awards More than $3.1 Million in Grants to Preserve and Interpret World War II Japanese American Confinement Sites

Sierra Sun Times: National Park Service Awards More than $3.1 Million in Grants to Preserve and Interpret World War II Japanese American Confinement Sites. “The National Park Service is pleased to announce more than $3.1 million in Japanese American Confinement Sites grants that will fund preservation, restoration and education projects throughout the country. The 22 projects funded will help tell the stories of the more than 120,000 Japanese Americans, two-thirds of whom were U.S. citizens, imprisoned by the U.S. government during World War II following the attack on Pearl Harbor by the nation of Japan in 1941.”

Internet Archive Blog: What Happens When Everyone who Experienced an Event is Gone?

Internet Archive Blog: What Happens When Everyone who Experienced an Event is Gone?. “This week at a community event at the Internet Archive, Tom Ikeda and I were happy to announce that you can now borrow No-No Boy here, at the Digital Library of Japanese American Incarceration on archive.org. Working with scholars from Densho, we’ve selected, purchased and digitized more than 500 important books about WWII experiences of Japanese Americans.”

California State University, Dominguez Hills: CSUDH Receives Grant to Continue Japanese American Digitization Project

California State University, Dominguez Hills: CSUDH Receives Grant to Continue Japanese American Digitization Project. “California State University, Dominguez Hills’ (CSUDH) Donald R. and Beverly J. Gerth Archives and Special Collections has received $282,102 from the National Parks Service’s (NPS) World War II Japanese American Confinement Sites (JACS) grant program to continue its work on the California State University Japanese American Digitization Project (CSUJAD).”

KNOM: Alaska Native Voices from WWII Are Focus of Historical Project

KNOM: Alaska Native Voices from WWII Are Focus of Historical Project. “IN AUGUST, the National Center for American Indian Enterprise Development recognized forty Native leaders around the country for their ’40 Under 40 Awards,’ including Dr. Holly Miowak Guise, an Inupiaq woman raised in Anchorage and Unalakleet. The center recognizes Indigenous leaders across the U.S. for making significant impacts in business or their community. KNOM’s Emily Hofstaedter spoke with Dr. Guise about how she’s working to bring the history of Alaska Natives in World War II to a wider audience.” This is an audio interview but it has a lot of excerpts.

Arkansas Democrat-Gazette: Arkansas internment sites get $270K through Park Service grant

Arkansas Democrat-Gazette: Arkansas internment sites get $270K through Park Service grant. “Two Japanese American confinement sites in Arkansas will receive a total of nearly $270,000 from the National Park Service to support efforts to preserve and educate others about what happened there during World War II, officials said on Monday.”

Now Available! The Japanese American Internment Sites: A Digital Archive (Berkeley)

Berkeley: Now Available! The Japanese American Internment Sites: A Digital Archive. “The project builds upon two previous grants conducted between 2011-2017 to digitize 100,000 documents from the Japanese American Evacuation and Resettlement Study and 150,000 original items from Bancroft’s archival collections including the personal papers of internees, correspondence, extensive photograph collections, maps, artworks and audiovisual materials. Together, these collections bring the total number of digitized and publicly available items to about 400,000 and form one of the premier sources of digital documentation on Japanese American Confinement found anywhere.”

The Atlantic: Internet Sleuths Are Hunting for China’s Secret Internment Camps for Muslims

The Atlantic: Internet Sleuths Are Hunting for China’s Secret Internment Camps for Muslims. “Citizen journalists and scholars are in a race against time, scouring the internet for evidence before the Chinese government can erase it. Since last year, the country has been sending vast numbers of Muslims to internment camps, where it tries to force them to renounce Islam and embrace the Communist Party, as The New York Times and other media outlets have reported based on interviews with former inmates. At this point, as many as one million Muslims are being held in the camps, according to an estimate widely cited by the UN and U.S. officials.”

California State University, Dominguez Hills: Japanese American Digitization Project Receives $238,520

California State University, Dominguez Hills: Japanese American Digitization Project Receives $238,520. “California State University, Dominguez Hills’ (CSUDH) Donald R. Beverly J. Gerth Archives and Special Collections has received a two-year $238,520 archival grant from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) to continue its work on the CSU Japanese American Digitization Project (CSUJAD). The NHPRC grant will support a project that makes accessible online 10,400 archival records from 19 collections featuring 20th century Japanese American history held at eight institutions throughout California.”

Northeastern Illinois University Independent: NEIU’s Ronald Williams Library released a digital collection of the Japanese American Redress documents

Northeastern Illinois University Independent: NEIU’s Ronald Williams Library released a digital collection of the Japanese American Redress documents. “NEIU’s Ronald Williams Library released a digital collection of the Japanese American Redress documents that focused on the the Commission on the Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians (CWRIC) hearings. The CWRIC hearings took place on NEIU’s main campus on September 22-23, 1981.”

Manchester Evening News: The grisly history of Britain’s biggest and worst World War Two internment camp

Manchester Evening News: The grisly history of Britain’s biggest and worst World War Two internment camp. “An old cotton mill hides a shameful, little-known secret. Now part of an industrial estate, the brick buildings have changed little over the years. A passer-by might never know the suffering endured there After the outbreak of the Second World War, the mill became a grim, spartan internment camp for thousands of innocent Italian, Austrians and German Jews who had fled the fear of Nazi death camps for new lives in Britain. All men – they were wrongly branded ‘enemy aliens’ as wartime national security was blurred with paranoia and suspicion.”

Libraries and Archives Canada: Images of Japanese-Canadians from the Second World War now on Flickr

Libraries and Archives Canada: Images of Japanese-Canadians from the Second World War now on Flickr . “December 8, 1941—Canada invokes the War Measures Act and declares Japanese-Canadians and recent immigrants as enemy aliens to strip them of individual and property rights. Over 1,200 fishing boats owned by Japanese-Canadian fishermen are confiscated off the coast of British Columbia as a defensive measure against Japan’s war efforts on the Pacific Front.” Small collection. I had not realized that Canada also put its Japanese-descent citizens in internment camps.

Voices in Confinement: A Digital Archive of Japanese American Internees (Berkeley)

Berkeley: Voices in Confinement: A Digital Archive of Japanese American Internees. “The Japanese American Evacuation and Resettlement Digital Archive is the result of a two-year grant generously funded by the National Park Service as part of the Japanese American Confinement Sites Grant Program. The grant titled, ‘Voices in Confinement: A Digital Archive of Japanese American Internees’, includes approximately 150,000 original items including the personal papers of internees, correspondence, extensive photograph collections, maps, artworks and audiovisual materials.”