Internet Archive Blog: What Happens When Everyone who Experienced an Event is Gone?

Internet Archive Blog: What Happens When Everyone who Experienced an Event is Gone?. “This week at a community event at the Internet Archive, Tom Ikeda and I were happy to announce that you can now borrow No-No Boy here, at the Digital Library of Japanese American Incarceration on archive.org. Working with scholars from Densho, we’ve selected, purchased and digitized more than 500 important books about WWII experiences of Japanese Americans.”

California State University, Dominguez Hills: CSUDH Receives Grant to Continue Japanese American Digitization Project

California State University, Dominguez Hills: CSUDH Receives Grant to Continue Japanese American Digitization Project. “California State University, Dominguez Hills’ (CSUDH) Donald R. and Beverly J. Gerth Archives and Special Collections has received $282,102 from the National Parks Service’s (NPS) World War II Japanese American Confinement Sites (JACS) grant program to continue its work on the California State University Japanese American Digitization Project (CSUJAD).”

KNOM: Alaska Native Voices from WWII Are Focus of Historical Project

KNOM: Alaska Native Voices from WWII Are Focus of Historical Project. “IN AUGUST, the National Center for American Indian Enterprise Development recognized forty Native leaders around the country for their ’40 Under 40 Awards,’ including Dr. Holly Miowak Guise, an Inupiaq woman raised in Anchorage and Unalakleet. The center recognizes Indigenous leaders across the U.S. for making significant impacts in business or their community. KNOM’s Emily Hofstaedter spoke with Dr. Guise about how she’s working to bring the history of Alaska Natives in World War II to a wider audience.” This is an audio interview but it has a lot of excerpts.

Arkansas Democrat-Gazette: Arkansas internment sites get $270K through Park Service grant

Arkansas Democrat-Gazette: Arkansas internment sites get $270K through Park Service grant. “Two Japanese American confinement sites in Arkansas will receive a total of nearly $270,000 from the National Park Service to support efforts to preserve and educate others about what happened there during World War II, officials said on Monday.”

Now Available! The Japanese American Internment Sites: A Digital Archive (Berkeley)

Berkeley: Now Available! The Japanese American Internment Sites: A Digital Archive. “The project builds upon two previous grants conducted between 2011-2017 to digitize 100,000 documents from the Japanese American Evacuation and Resettlement Study and 150,000 original items from Bancroft’s archival collections including the personal papers of internees, correspondence, extensive photograph collections, maps, artworks and audiovisual materials. Together, these collections bring the total number of digitized and publicly available items to about 400,000 and form one of the premier sources of digital documentation on Japanese American Confinement found anywhere.”

The Atlantic: Internet Sleuths Are Hunting for China’s Secret Internment Camps for Muslims

The Atlantic: Internet Sleuths Are Hunting for China’s Secret Internment Camps for Muslims. “Citizen journalists and scholars are in a race against time, scouring the internet for evidence before the Chinese government can erase it. Since last year, the country has been sending vast numbers of Muslims to internment camps, where it tries to force them to renounce Islam and embrace the Communist Party, as The New York Times and other media outlets have reported based on interviews with former inmates. At this point, as many as one million Muslims are being held in the camps, according to an estimate widely cited by the UN and U.S. officials.”

California State University, Dominguez Hills: Japanese American Digitization Project Receives $238,520

California State University, Dominguez Hills: Japanese American Digitization Project Receives $238,520. “California State University, Dominguez Hills’ (CSUDH) Donald R. Beverly J. Gerth Archives and Special Collections has received a two-year $238,520 archival grant from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) to continue its work on the CSU Japanese American Digitization Project (CSUJAD). The NHPRC grant will support a project that makes accessible online 10,400 archival records from 19 collections featuring 20th century Japanese American history held at eight institutions throughout California.”