My Yellowknife Now: Library and Archives Canada funds projects to help preserve Indigenous culture and language recordings

My Yellowknife Now: Library and Archives Canada funds projects to help preserve Indigenous culture and language recordings. “Library and Archives Canada (LAC) is providing $2.3 million to support 31 projects by First Nations, Inuit and Métis Nation organizations. As part of the Government of Canada’s reconciliation efforts, LAC is supporting Indigenous communities as they seek to preserve and make accessible their existing audio and video heritage for future generations.”

CBC: Inuit sharing ancient knowledge of ice, sea and land with new app

CBC: Inuit sharing ancient knowledge of ice, sea and land with new app . “A social media app geared toward the outdoor lives of Inuit launched Wednesday with features that tie traditional knowledge to smartphone technology. The Siku app and web platform, named after the Inuktitut word for sea ice, allows users to trade observations about dangerous conditions, document wildlife sightings and trade hunting stories.”

CBC: Online database for Inuit art looking for Nunatsiavut artists

CBC: Online database for Inuit art looking for Nunatsiavut artists. “The Inuit Art Foundation is looking for Nunatsiavut artists to add to their growing online database, which highlights Inuit artists from across Canada. The IAF’s goal is to broaden the public’s awareness of the history of Inuit art and to connect artists with researchers or anyone who is interested in the art an artist creates.”

Embroideries, Facebook, and Virtual Sovereignty: How One Student Is Making History Accessible (Bowdoin College)

Bowdoin College: Embroideries, Facebook, and Virtual Sovereignty: How One Student Is Making History Accessible. “Ariana Smith ’21 has a Gibbons grant from Bowdoin this summer to continue researching the history of the Arctic Museum’s collections of Inuit embroideries—and to share this past with the people whose ancestors created them.”

Eye on the Arctic: Alaskan Inuit dialect added to Facebook’s Translate app

Eye on the Arctic: Alaskan Inuit dialect added to Facebook’s Translate app. “Facebook added Inupiaq, an Alaskan Inuit dialect, as a language option thanks to a grassroots project started by an Alaskan man. Myles Creed is from the Inupiaq community of Kotzebue, Alaska. He’s a PhD student studying linguistics at the University of Victoria and is involved with Inupiaq language revitalization in Alaska.”

CBC: Step aside, YouTube: Inuktitube a ‘one-stop-shop’ for online Inuktitut videos

CBC: Step aside, YouTube: Inuktitube a ‘one-stop-shop’ for online Inuktitut videos. “Inuktitut videos have a new home on the internet: it’s called Inuktitube, the YouTube for people who speak Inuktitut. It’s a four-year-old passion project, according to Ryan Oliver, the owner of Pinnguaq, a non-profit technology startup that’s behind many Inuit-based media projects, including teaching computer code to kids. “

‘Where is she buried?’ Government prepares database on Inuit tuberculosis graves (Metro News Canada)

Metro News (Canada): ‘Where is she buried?’ Government prepares database on Inuit tuberculosis graves. “After nearly 10 years of work, the federal government is preparing to release a database holding everything that is known about what happened to people who were taken south for tuberculosis treatment…. Since 2008, [Elizabeth] Logue and a team of researchers have been pouring over records from federal departments, provincial and territorial archives, church files, records from cemeteries, sanatoria and hospitals as well as from individual informants. They now have a database of records on about 4,500 Inuit who were taken south.”

CBC News: ‘Wikipedia of Inuit knowledge’ captures hunting, weather data in Hudson Bay

CBC News: ‘Wikipedia of Inuit knowledge’ captures hunting, weather data in Hudson Bay. “A new database is creating an encyclopedia of knowledge for Inuit observations of the sea ice, wildlife and land in and around Hudson Bay. Inuit who live in the community of Sanikiluaq, Nunavut, have been noticing differences in their environment for years — from sea ice freezing in ways it didn’t in the past, to seals eating fish that they never used to. Now, thanks to a new technology called Siku, set up by the Arctic Eider Society, hunters will have a way to track those changes and share them with other Inuit.”

New Web Site Highlights Archaeological Finds in Coastal Alaska

A new Web site highlights archaeological finds in coastal Alaska. “In 2013, construction workers laying cable for a new 3G network stumbled upon some artifacts near a Kotzebue beach. Those objects — about 4,000 were found — were sent for storage at the University of Alaska Museum of the North archives. … Now the most notable of the Kotzebue objects are available on an interactive website for anyone to check out.” Not all the items were included on the Web site because many were severely degraded – the items are estimated to be about 800 years old.

Database of Inuktut Language Learning Materials Now Available

Now available: a database of Inuktut language learning materials. Inuktut is one of the principal Inuit languages of Canada. “ITK officially launched the website Katiqsugat: Inuit Early Learning Resources Sept. 2, a central database that is home to a number of games, songs, craft ideas, research, child care policy and other resources for parents.”

Inuvialuit Cultural Resource Centre Resources Are Going Online

The Inuvialuit Cultural Resource Centre is getting a digital archive.

“The Inuvialuit Cultural Resource Centre is having its collections digitized and uploaded online thanks to a University of Alberta research project. When the project is complete, Inuvialuit audio recordings, documentaries and texts will be available on the internet.”

The Inuvialuit are an Inuit people who live in arctic Canada, and any people who have a specific game to try to make each other laugh (mak) sound great to me.