Coronavirus wrap: IOC reveals cost of postponing Tokyo Olympics (Free Press)

Free Press: Coronavirus wrap: IOC reveals cost of postponing Tokyo Olympics. “The International Olympic Committee faces a £650 million bill following the postponement of the Tokyo Games to 2021. IOC president Thomas Bach revealed on Thursday the organisation’s executive committee has set aside the sum to cover the costs of reorganisation and to support individual sports federations and national Olympic committees.” £650 million is a bit under $791 million USD.

Olympics: IOC, Tokyo organizers to clamp down on video in social media (Kyodo News)

Kyodo News: Olympics: IOC, Tokyo organizers to clamp down on video in social media. “In what some argue is a step backwards, spectators will be prohibited from posting video they take at the Tokyo 2020 Olympics on social media services. The International Olympic Committee encourages fans and competitors to be active on social networking services, but the rules are meant to protect the huge investments companies have made to broadcast the games.” All this will do is piss everyone off and cause resentment towards the IOC. Yay.

Jim Weber: How a GIF of Aly Raisman’s Floor Routine Got Me Permanently Banned From Twitter

If you ever wonder why people just don’t seem to like Twitter, here you go: How a GIF of Aly Raisman’s Floor Routine Got Me Permanently Banned From Twitter. “I had read that the IOC was banning the press from using GIFs but I didn’t see how that applied to me. Sure, I didn’t have the rights to any footage at the Olympics — just like countless blogs and users don’t have rights to the NFL, NBA, MLB, NHL and NCAA footage that they create GIFs out of and profit from every day. But I figured the worst thing that would happen is the GIF would be deleted from my account, as Twitter often does in these situations. Boy was I wrong.”

Canadian Business: How two Canadian designers salvaged a century of Olympic logos

An interesting read and comforting, in a backhanded way, to know that even the International Olympic Committee can’t always keep its archives straight: How two Canadian designers salvaged a century of Olympic logos. “…Hulse & Durrell was hired to compile, digitize and edit all the emblems, pictograms, mascots and colour palettes from past Olympic Games into a catalogue of brand marks that could eventually be licensed and emblazoned on everything from clothing to coffee mugs. The challenge was that the IOC’s digital archive was itself incomplete: it had only a rudimentary collection of historical materials—and some of those materials, especially older, pre-digital samples, contained errors. Roman numerals were cut off at the edge of the frame, fonts were inconsistent and colour gradients had inexplicably crept into the artwork. “