Wicklow News: Arklow Pottery digital archive goes live

Wicklow News (Ireland): Arklow Pottery digital archive goes live. “The ‘Arklow Pottery Online’ project was initiated in May 2022 to create a digital pattens database, backstamp reference guide, photo & video archive, and oral history record capturing the stories of some of those who worked in Arklow Pottery. The project was completed recently, and all of these resources are now accessible via a new website where it will be available for future generations to engage with and learn about the heritage of one of the Potteries.”

The Journal (Ireland): Online archive of messages left at Savita mural expected to be accessible by 2023

The Journal (Ireland): Online archive of messages left at Savita mural expected to be accessible by 2023. “DUBLIN CITY LIBRARY and Archive says it hopes the digital archive of messages left at the Savita Halappanavar mural will be completed by early 2023…. Ms Halappanavar died at 17 weeks pregnant in 2012 from sepsis – the young woman had requested an abortion, which was denied on legal grounds by University Hospital Galway. Her death sparked a wave of outcry over Ireland’s restrictive abortion laws.”

Tipperary News: Tipperary museum digitises its collection and launches its new website

Tipperary News: Tipperary museum digitises its collection and launches its new website. “The Thomas MacDonagh Museum in Cloughjordan will host a special event this Friday at 7.30pm to launch its Digital Memories Collection… The collection marks the conclusion of a significant six-month project undertaken by the museum directors to digitise 140 objects from the museum’s vast collection, and create a new website.”

The Clare Herald: Clare invite to Dublin Festival of History online

The Clare Herald: Clare invite to Dublin Festival of History online. “Now in its eighth year, the festival will take place largely online as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic, but will still play host to an international and domestic line up of speakers and panels. The festival will shine a light and fresh perspective on topics such as the construction of the notion of race, Ireland’s last great pandemic and the history of Ireland’s partition.” Events are free but registration is required.

‘These were babies, not numbers’: New website documents deaths in mother and baby homes (The Journal)

The Journal (Ireland): ‘These were babies, not numbers’: New website documents deaths in mother and baby homes. “INSPIRED BY HIS own family’s connection to Bessborough mother and baby home in Cork, Daniel Loftus has committed to compiling an online database that documents all the people who died in these institutions in Ireland. The 18-year-old student started Project Infant in July and is currently going through records for various mother and baby homes, county homes and other institutions in a bid to compile a comprehensive list of all the mothers and children who died there.”

Limerick Castles Database

Big shout to Twitter user @osint_unleashed who found this: the Limerick castles database. From the project about page: “Joseph Lennon is an historian and a graduate of Limerick Institute of Technology and the University of Limerick, and currently based in the National University of Ireland Galway. For over a decade, Joseph has been compiling a comprehensive archive of images documenting the castles and tower houses of Limerick. This fieldwork has taken him to the four corners of the county and beyond; including to Castle Lishen and Kilbolane, once part of Limerick but now in County Cork.”

IrishCentral: Did your ancestors come from Armagh? Massive amount of new records released online

IrishCentral: Did your ancestors come from Armagh? Massive amount of new records released online. “Are you searching for family history in Co Armagh? We might have another breadcrumb to add to your trail. Roots Ireland has just added 26,210 Armagh records to their database. Dating from the 17th to the 20th centuries, the historic Irish records contain census substitutes, church records, and headstone records.”

Dublin Port Company: The Dublin Port Digital Archive Is Now Live

Dublin Port Company: The Dublin Port Digital Archive Is Now Live. “The Dublin Port Archive covers the history of the Port from 1707, offering a unique insight into how Dublin Port shaped Dublin City. The Archive is comprised of 75,000 photographs, 30,000 engineering drawings, 600 historical registers, yearbooks dating back to 1926 along with a ‘Name Book’ for employees from 1906 to 1925.”

The Construction Index: Funding secured for Irish navvy archive

The Construction Index: Funding secured for Irish navvy archive. “The archive will include an array of documents and recordings of the many Irish emigrants who became known as the generation that built Britain. It will be digitised from records and interviews already gathered by Irish historian Ultan Cowley for a book who wrote more than 20 years ago, chronicling the tales of those who crossed the Irish Sea to work in UK construction. Irish construction workers at the time were widely labelled as ‘navvies’, the pejorative term used for the manual labourers who dug the canal network (the navigators) in the 18th and 19th centuries.”

Derry Now: Fascinating Garda Photographic Archive captures some of the major events from past 100 years

Derry Now: Fascinating Garda Photographic Archive captures some of the major events from past 100 years. “Hundreds of historical photos captured by An Garda Síochána from some of the most significant historic Irish events during the last 100 years will be made available to the public for the first time. An Garda Síochána has launched its Garda Centenary Online Photographic Archive 1922 – 2022 as part of its current centenary celebrations.” An Garda Síochána is the national police force of Ireland.

From the Bridge: a view of Irish traditional music in New York launched Wednesday 29 June 2022 (Irish Traditional Music Archive)

Irish Traditional Music Archive: From the Bridge: a view of Irish traditional music in New York launched Wednesday 29 June 2022. “The online exhibition showcases rare recordings, stories and photographs relating to New York’s remarkably rich Irish traditional music heritage. The ‘at-risk’ multimedia materials have now been preserved by ITMA and will be freely accessible online to a global audience thanks to the generosity of collectors, performers, their families, and our funders.”