Dublin Port Company: The Dublin Port Digital Archive Is Now Live

Dublin Port Company: The Dublin Port Digital Archive Is Now Live. “The Dublin Port Archive covers the history of the Port from 1707, offering a unique insight into how Dublin Port shaped Dublin City. The Archive is comprised of 75,000 photographs, 30,000 engineering drawings, 600 historical registers, yearbooks dating back to 1926 along with a ‘Name Book’ for employees from 1906 to 1925.”

The Construction Index: Funding secured for Irish navvy archive

The Construction Index: Funding secured for Irish navvy archive. “The archive will include an array of documents and recordings of the many Irish emigrants who became known as the generation that built Britain. It will be digitised from records and interviews already gathered by Irish historian Ultan Cowley for a book who wrote more than 20 years ago, chronicling the tales of those who crossed the Irish Sea to work in UK construction. Irish construction workers at the time were widely labelled as ‘navvies’, the pejorative term used for the manual labourers who dug the canal network (the navigators) in the 18th and 19th centuries.”

Derry Now: Fascinating Garda Photographic Archive captures some of the major events from past 100 years

Derry Now: Fascinating Garda Photographic Archive captures some of the major events from past 100 years. “Hundreds of historical photos captured by An Garda Síochána from some of the most significant historic Irish events during the last 100 years will be made available to the public for the first time. An Garda Síochána has launched its Garda Centenary Online Photographic Archive 1922 – 2022 as part of its current centenary celebrations.” An Garda Síochána is the national police force of Ireland.

From the Bridge: a view of Irish traditional music in New York launched Wednesday 29 June 2022 (Irish Traditional Music Archive)

Irish Traditional Music Archive: From the Bridge: a view of Irish traditional music in New York launched Wednesday 29 June 2022. “The online exhibition showcases rare recordings, stories and photographs relating to New York’s remarkably rich Irish traditional music heritage. The ‘at-risk’ multimedia materials have now been preserved by ITMA and will be freely accessible online to a global audience thanks to the generosity of collectors, performers, their families, and our funders.”

Clare Herald: New website showcases life of Brendan O’Regan

Clare Herald: New website showcases life of Brendan O’Regan. “Brendan O’Regan’s many achievements include setting up the world’s first duty-free airport retail outlet at Shannon Airport. In economic terms, he initiated Ireland’s first programme of foreign direct investment in manufacturing, based on a favourable enterprise climate. Internationally, he is acknowledged as the father of the €70 billion a year airport duty-free business.”

Trinity College Dublin: Cuala Press Prints Digitised And Available Online As Part Of Virtual Trinity Library

Trinity College Dublin: Cuala Press Prints Digitised And Available Online As Part Of Virtual Trinity Library. . “The Library of Trinity College, Dublin is delighted to announce that as part of an ongoing Virtual Trinity Library project, over one hundred images of Cuala Press prints are now available to view online on Trinity College Dublin’s Digital Collections platform.”

The Guardian: Seven centuries of Irish archives painstakingly recreated after being destroyed in civil war

The Guardian: Seven centuries of Irish archives painstakingly recreated after being destroyed in civil war. “In June 1922, the opening battle of Ireland’s civil war destroyed one of Europe’s great archives in a historic calamity that reduced seven centuries of documents and manuscripts to ash and dust. Now, on the eve of the disaster’s centenary, a virtual reconstruction of the building and its archives is to be unveiled. Historians, archivists and computer scientists have spent five years piecing together much of what had been thought lost for ever.”

Irish Times: Documents saved from 1922 public record office fire to be conserved

Irish Times: Documents saved from 1922 public record office fire to be conserved. “Precious documents relating to Dublin port, which were saved from the Public Record Office fire in the city’s Four Courts in the opening engagement of the Civil War, are set to be restored. In the aftermath of the fire on June 30th, 1922, more than 25,000 sheets of paper and parchment were retrieved from the rubble. These records, which date from the 14th to the 19th centuries and are known as the ‘1922 salved records’, are now held at the National Archives.”

Irish Times: Sinn Féin’s targeting of voters through social media has paid off

Irish Times: Sinn Féin’s targeting of voters through social media has paid off. “In a campaign dubbed safe and lacklustre by many commentators, Sinn Féin’s targeting of younger and disconnected voters through videos on platforms such as TikTok – where it has 80,000 followers alone – Instagram and Facebook has been linked in part to its historic win.”

Dublin City University: Updated Placenames of Ireland website launched by Minister Jack Chambers

Dublin City University: Updated Placenames of Ireland website launched by Minister Jack Chambers . “The updated… website provides a searchable database of the official Irish-language versions of approximately 100,000 places throughout the country. The new Placenames Database of Ireland site features interactive maps, aerial photography and better ease of navigation for those looking to find out the origins of place names from Arklow to Zion Road.”

The Beacon: Irish extremist Telegram channels are sharing pro-Russia disinformation from sources directly linked to Kremlin security services

The Beacon: Irish extremist Telegram channels are sharing pro-Russia disinformation from sources directly linked to Kremlin security services. “No country has escaped Russia’s Information War, least of all the various shades of conspiracy theorists and far-right extremists. Having all but abandoned focusing on COVID-19 and the associated lockdowns, our own assortment of conspiracy theorists and extremists here in Ireland jumped on the war as their latest hobby horse. From the beginning of the war Russian disinformation was rife in their ecosphere. Nearly three months on, though, has that changed?”