Department of Justice: Local man charged with making threat during university Zoom lecture

Department of Justice: Local man charged with making threat during university Zoom lecture. “Federal authorities took him into custody late Friday, Sept. 4, upon the filing of a criminal complaint. According to those charges, Al Bayati identified himself as Abu Qital al Jihadi al Mansur and joined a UH student lecture via Zoom on Sept. 2. Shortly thereafter, he allegedly interrupted and said ‘what does any of this have to do with the fact that UH is about to get bombed in a few days?'”

Islamic State: Giant library of group’s online propaganda discovered (BBC)

BBC: Islamic State: Giant library of group’s online propaganda discovered. “One of the largest collections of online material belonging to the group calling itself Islamic State has been discovered by researchers at the Institute of Strategic Dialogue (ISD). The digital library contains more than 90,000 items and has an estimated 10,000 unique visitors a month. Experts say it provides a way to continually replenish extremist content on the net. But taking it down is difficult because the data is not stored in one place.”

University of Maine: Sporer finds ISIL supporters promote justifications of terrorist group’s violence on Twitter

University of Maine: Sporer finds ISIL supporters promote justifications of terrorist group’s violence on Twitter. “Sympathizers of the Islamic State and the Levant (ISIL) use Twitter to promote justifications of mass casualty violence perpetrated against civilians by the terrorist group, according to a new study led by Karyn Sporer, an assistant professor of sociology at the University of Maine.”

Voice of America News: IS’s Virtual Caliphate Struggles to Regain Footing on Social Media

Voice of America News: IS’s Virtual Caliphate Struggles to Regain Footing on Social Media. “Islamic State media operatives appear to be flailing about in cyberspace, still trying to recover more than a week after tens of thousands of their messaging accounts were targeted by European officials. Unlike some past efforts to hamper the terror group’s propaganda efforts, which dealt only temporary setbacks, the latest takedown seems to be having a lasting impact, counterterrorism officials and analysts say.”

Neowin: Europol says it has taken Islamic State presences offline

Neowin: Europol says it has taken Islamic State presences offline. “The European Union’s police agency, Europol, has announced that it has hit Islamic State’s online presence, claiming that the group is totally offline for the time being. With the rapidity that online groups can be set up, they may spring back up in time but it’ll likely take a while for any subscribers of those channels to reconnect.”

Seattle Times: Facebook still auto-generating Islamic State, al-Qaida pages

Seattle Times: Facebook still auto-generating Islamic State, al-Qaida pages. “In the face of criticism that Facebook is not doing enough to combat extremist messaging, the company likes to say that its automated systems remove the vast majority of prohibited content glorifying the Islamic State group and al-Qaida before it’s reported. But a whistleblower’s complaint shows that Facebook itself has inadvertently provided the two extremist groups with a networking and recruitment tool by producing dozens of pages in their names.”

TechCrunch: Hackers are spreading Islamic State propaganda by hijacking dormant Twitter accounts

TechCrunch: Hackers are spreading Islamic State propaganda by hijacking dormant Twitter accounts. “Hackers are using a decade-old flaw to target and hijack dormant Twitter accounts to spread terrorist propaganda, TechCrunch has learned. Many of the affected Twitter accounts appeared to be hijacked in recent days or weeks — some longer — after years of inactivity. A sudden shift in tone or the language used in tweets often gives away the hijack — usually a single tweet in Arabic, sometimes praising Allah or retweeting propaganda from another account.”

Inside Higher Education: Controversy Over an ISIS Archive

Inside Higher Education: Controversy Over an ISIS Archive . “Middle East studies scholars are criticizing a decision by George Washington University to cooperate with The New York Times to create a public online archive of the ‘ISIS files,’ internal Islamic State documents that were removed from Iraq by the newspaper and became the subject of the investigative article ‘The ISIS Files.’ The Middle East Studies Association’s Committee on Academic Freedom previously criticized the newspaper’s decision to remove and publicize the documents, arguing in a letter in May that the Times had no right to remove the documents and that the publication of documents containing personal information risked endangering the safety of individual Iraqis.”

BBC: IS propaganda ‘hidden on Internet Archive’

BBC: IS propaganda ‘hidden on Internet Archive’. “Supporters of the Islamic State group are using the Internet Archive to frustrate efforts to delete their online propaganda, a study suggests. The report analysed hundreds of thousands of links posted to two hidden forums used by the extremist group. Archive.org links were found to be the most common type on both of the forums for the past two years.”

Phys.org: Twitter pushes out Islamic state supporters, but shift may hinder counterterrorism, study finds

Phys.org: Twitter pushes out Islamic state supporters, but shift may hinder counterterrorism, study finds . “Although Twitter was once the preferred platform of the Islamic State group, the social network’s counter-extremism policies – including content removal – contributed to a decline in activity by IS supporters. New research from the George Washington University’s Program on Extremism indicates the company’s efforts may have been effective, but further analysis suggests IS’s fight on Twitter is far from over.”

Phys.org: Research finds social media disruption impacting on Islamic State propaganda

Phys.org: Research finds social media disruption impacting on Islamic State propaganda. “Researchers from the VOX-Pol project at Dublin City University, together with colleagues from the University of Sussex, have found that the social media platform, Twitter is becoming less effective for the so-called ‘Islamic State’ (IS), due to the rapid take-down rate of pro-IS accounts from the site. It found that IS accounts faced ‘substantial and aggressive disruption’. However, the researchers warn that as the predominant focus for disruption is IS, it has enabled a wide range of other disparate violent Jihadi groups to maintain a strong social media presence.

In Development: Digital Archive for the Mementos Left After Nice, France Attacks

In development: a digital archive for the mementos left after the 2016 attacks in Nice, France. “Authorities and volunteers in Nice have removed thousands of mementoes laid out for victims of last summer’s truck rampage as the city readies for its annual carnival, its biggest public event since the Islamist attack that killed 86 people. Authorities plan to preserve some of the poems, photos and other objects draped over the bandstand at the city’s seafront Promenade des Anglais and move others online as a permanent memorial.”

WaPo: How a U.S. team uses Facebook, guerrilla marketing to peel off potential ISIS recruits

Washington Post: How a U.S. team uses Facebook, guerrilla marketing to peel off potential ISIS recruits. “Sometime today, a teenager in Tunis will check his smartphone for the latest violent video from the Islamic State. But the images that pop up first will be of a different genre: young Muslims questioning the morality of terrorists who slaughter innocents and enslave girls for sex.”

WSJ: Twitter and Islamic State Deadlock on Social Media Battlefield

From The Wall Street Journal: Twitter and Islamic State Deadlock on Social Media Battlefield. “U.S. companies such as Twitter, Facebook and YouTube, joined by online hackers and similarly minded groups, have for months aggressively battled the spread of Islamic State material online. Accounts and posts that would have stayed alive for weeks now sometimes last as little as a few hours. Islamic State supporters, particularly on Twitter, have responded to the crackdown by opening accounts almost as quickly as gatekeepers delete them.”