OneZero: Meet the People Who Still Have AOL Email Addresses

OneZero: Meet the People Who Still Have AOL Email Addresses. “…despite the rise of broadband and free email, both AOL and EarthLink have somehow managed to survive. It’s difficult to get up-to-date figures, since the two entities are now subsidiaries and barely register as a blip on their parent companies’ balance sheets. Neither company would disclose its current number of monthly subscribers, but as of 2014, more than 2.1 million people still used AOL dial-up.” Obviously I do not use dial-up, but I still have a Mindspring account I’ve had since ~1998. That email address is in some of my books and such and I’m reluctant to get rid of it. I should at some point.

Ubergizmo: ISPs Told To Reveal Information They Collect On Users

Ubergizmo: ISPs Told To Reveal Information They Collect On Users. “The Federal Trade Commission has sent out an order to several big internet service providers in the United States, telling them to detail the data that they collect on their customers and the purpose for which it’s collected. This may signal new regulatory action from the FTC as the information may reveal patterns of abuse or otherwise concerning use of data against which states or the FTC may want to take action.”

Ars Technica: Entire broadband industry sues Vermont to stop state net neutrality law

Ars Technica: Entire broadband industry sues Vermont to stop state net neutrality law. “The nation’s largest broadband industry lobby groups have sued Vermont to stop a state law that requires ISPs to follow net neutrality principles in order to qualify for government contracts. The lawsuit was filed yesterday in US District Court in Vermont by mobile industry lobby CTIA, cable industry lobby NCTA, telco lobby USTelecom, the New England Cable & Telecommunications Association, and the American Cable Association (ACA), which represents small and mid-size cable companies.”

Northeastern: New research shows that, post net neutrality, internet providers are slowing down your streaming

Northeastern: New research shows that, post net neutrality, internet providers are slowing down your streaming. “New net neutrality rules, born in 2015 and struck down two years later, were conceived to protect consumers’ ability to access all online information equally. During this short lifespan, [Dave] Choffnes and two Northeastern students developed an app that could track violations of net neutrality. Apple originally blocked the app, now called Wehe, from its App Store. But after ensuing media coverage caused a sharp increase in the number of Wehe users, Choffnes found himself with a wealth of data.”

Motherboard: Telecom Lobbyists Have Stalled 70 State-Level Bills That Would Protect Consumer Privacy

Motherboard: Telecom Lobbyists Have Stalled 70 State-Level Bills That Would Protect Consumer Privacy. “On July 27, Washington, DC’s Office of Cable Television, Film, Music, and Entertainment proposed a set of rules restricting the city’s internet service providers from selling customer data and browsing history without their consent. The proposal seems basic, commonsense and broadly supported by the public. And, if recent history is any judge, it’s doomed to failure.”

CNET: No, the FCC won’t charge you $225 to complain about robocalls

CNET: No, the FCC won’t charge you $225 to complain about robocalls. “The Federal Communications Chairman says it will not charge consumers $225 to hear their complaints about their phone providers. During the commission’s monthly meeting Thursday, Chairman Ajit Pai tried to clear up what he says is a misunderstanding over changes to the agency’s complaint process. The agency voted 3-1 to finalize a proposal that will “streamline and consolidate” rules for lodging complaints against phone companies. The revised rules consolidate rules that had been adopted over the past several decades and apply common deadlines for answering formal complaints and apply a shot clock to complaints about pole attachments.” I am including this for completion but I also feel I must add this disclaimer: I believe nothing the FCC says. If it announced that humans usually have two eyes I would go to a mirror and check.

“This is bonkers”: FCC wants to stop reviewing most complaints about ISPs (Ars Technica)

Ars Technica: “This is bonkers”: FCC wants to stop reviewing most complaints about ISPs. “Ajit Pai’s Federal Communications Commission is proposing that it stop reviewing the vast majority of consumer complaints about telecom companies. Going forward, consumers harmed by broadband, TV, and phone companies would have to pay $225 in order to get an FCC review of their complaints.”

Ars Technica: After vote to kill privacy rules, users try to “pollute” their Web history

Ars Technica: After vote to kill privacy rules, users try to “pollute” their Web history. “While the US government is giving ISPs free rein to track their customers’ Internet usage for purposes of serving personalized advertisements, some Internet users are determined to fill their browsing history with junk so ISPs can’t discover their real browsing habits. Scripts and browser extensions might be able to fill your Web history with random searches and site visits. But will this actually fool an ISP that scans your Web traffic and shares it with advertising networks?”

The Verge: Congress just cleared the way for internet providers to sell your web browsing history

The Verge: Congress just cleared the way for internet providers to sell your web browsing history. “Internet providers now just need a signature from President Trump before they’re free to take, share, and even sell your web browsing history without your permission. The House of Representatives passed a resolution today overturning an Obama-era FCC rule that required internet providers to get customers’ permission before sharing their browsing history with other companies. The rules also required internet providers to protect that data from hackers and inform customers of any breaches.”

PC World: Three privacy tools that block your Internet provider from tracking you

PC World: Three privacy tools that block your Internet provider from tracking you. “It’s on. Recently, the United States Senate saw fit to allow Internet Service Providers to sell your web browsing history and other data to third parties. The action has yet to pass the House, but if it does, it means anyone concerned about privacy will have to protect themselves against over zealous data collection from their ISP. Some privacy-conscious folks are already doing that—but many aren’t.”

Old Tech Support Scam Takes an ISP Twist

You’ve probably heard of the old “tech support pretending to be Microsoft” scam. Now we’ve got the “tech support pretending to be your ISP” scam. “A new scam, in which fraudsters pose as legitimate internet service providers to offer bogus tech support, either via the phone or on the net, is on the rise, the BBC has found….The online version of the scam involves a realistic pop-up that interrupts a victim’s normal browsing session with a message that appears to be legitimate and seems to come from the victim’s real ISP.”