Online archive of Eiko Ishioka: Blood, Sweat, and Tears—A Life of Design (e-flux)

e-flux: Online archive of Eiko Ishioka: Blood, Sweat, and Tears—A Life of Design . “The archive of the exhibition Eiko Ishioka: Blood, Sweat, and Tears—A Life of Design is available to view online for a limited period until March 31, 2022. The retrospective exhibition of acclaimed art director Eiko Ishioka was held at the Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo from November 2020 to February 2021, and caused a major sensation across generations. On this occasion, the entire exhibition with its comprehensive showcasing of work is once again brought to life through high quality 360°VR and exhibition highlights.”

National Film Archive of Japan: “Films of the Great Kanto Earthquake of 1923″ is now available.

National Film Archive of Japan: “Films of the Great Kanto Earthquake of 1923″ is now available.. “With the aim of sharing knowledge about the historic disaster and its impact on society via moving images, this website offers a selection of films of the Great Kanto Earthquake of 1923 which have survived over the century and now part of the collection of the National Film Archive of Japan.” The site is in Japanese, but Google Translate handled it.

TimeOut Tokyo: 3 exhibits to check out for free at the new Japan Cultural Expo online museum

New-to-me, from TimeOut Tokyo: 3 exhibits to check out for free at the new Japan Cultural Expo online museum. “With a theme of ‘Humanity and Nature’, the Japan Cultural Expo kicked off in 2019 in the lead-up to the Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games to promote Japanese culture through events across the country. Many of the events had an online component as well, so existing footage from the multi-year festival has been combined with some brand new content, and made available for free on the Japan Cultural Expo Virtual Platform.”

Learning from disaster: Across Tohoku, a race is on to preserve vital records (Japan Times)

Japan Times: Learning from disaster: Across Tohoku, a race is on to preserve vital records. “In a public facility run by the town of Okuma in Fukushima Prefecture, located in a designated no-go zone, stacks of cardboard boxes slowly gather dust. The boxes are filled with public documents detailing the March 2011 earthquake and subsequent tsunami, the triple meltdowns at the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant and the evacuation that followed — outlining the ordeal Okuma and its residents have been through over the past decade.”

My Modern Met: Download 1,000+ Japanese Woodblock Prints by Edo-Era Master Hiroshige

My Modern Met: Download 1,000+ Japanese Woodblock Prints by Edo-Era Master Hiroshige . “The Minneapolis Institute of Art recently made their extensive digital collection of woodblock prints by Hiroshige available to view and even download via their website. Within this 1,000+ image archive are examples of his landscapes, cityscapes, portraits, and more—many of which influenced Impressionist and Post-Impressionist painters like Monet and Van Gogh.”

KBS World: Digital Archive on Japan’s Wartime Sexual Slavery to be Set up in UCLA

KBS World: Digital Archive on Japan’s Wartime Sexual Slavery to be Set up in UCLA. “A digital archive with translated primary sources and documentary evidence on Japan’s wartime sexual slavery is set to be established at the University of California, Los Angeles(UCLA). Comfort Women Action for Redress and Education(CARE), an advocacy group for the victims of Japan’s wartime sexual slavery, said Tuesday that the online archive will be set up at UCLA’s Center for Korean Studies as early as July. ”

The Mainichi: Kamikaze pilot museum in Japan launches online services for remote visitors

The Mainichi: Kamikaze pilot museum in Japan launches online services for remote visitors . “The online museum consists of 10-minute footage introducing the facility’s layout, plus three 5-minute video clips providing three curators’ commentaries on display items. The clips show photographs of suicide pilots and their farewell notes, laid in order of their departure on the attack missions. The footage also demonstrates the characteristics of the Imperial Japanese Army fighter Hayate, and a replica of the suicide attack boat Shinyo, which are both on display at the museum. Google Maps’ StreetView function also enables a 360-degree view of the facility’s interior.”

Google Blog: Discover the people behind Japanese gastronomy

Google Blog: Discover the people behind Japanese gastronomy. “In partnership with the Japanese Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, Google Arts & Culture is launching a new project about the incredible people behind the uniqueness of Japanese cuisine. You can check out their stories through 48 new exhibitions and more than a thousand unique images and videos.”

FEATURE:Efforts made to archive 2011 Japan disaster data to pass on lessons (Kyodo News)

Kyodo News: FEATURE:Efforts made to archive 2011 Japan disaster data to pass on lessons. “Entities in Japan have been stepping up efforts to archive data of the 2011 devastating quake-tsunami disaster in the northeast, such as documents, pictures and video footage to pass on lessons of the catastrophe as people’s memory fades. Their collections serve as useful sources of information for researchers, educators and members of the general public who wish to learn from the past.”

Unseen Japan: A wild theory about how the Japanese word for ‘I’ was corrupted by Allied occupiers leaves Japanese Twitter users shaking their heads.

I’m not 100% sure why I’m including this story. I think it’s a combination of interest in the idea that misinformation turns up in the oddest places, and an interest in how it’s refuted by crowd action. Anyway, Unseen Japan: A wild theory about how the Japanese word for ‘I’ was corrupted by Allied occupiers leaves Japanese Twitter users shaking their heads.. “Languages evolve constantly. I’ve discussed this evolution in past articles – e.g., the drift from ‘nippon’ to ‘nihon’ for the name of Japan. Many times, this influence is just a natural, internal progression. But sometimes, it happens through outside influence or even force. In Japan, one story about a supposed forced change in the way that people spell a simple Japanese word recently made the rounds on Twitter. However, in this case, the ‘change’ appears to be nothing more than a post-World War II conspiracy theory.”

TimeOut Tokyo: This free virtual gallery lets you curate your own online exhibition of Japanese art

TimeOut Tokyo: This free virtual gallery lets you curate your own online exhibition of Japanese art . “Cultural Japan uses the International Image Interoperability Framework, a database with over 500,000 digital versions of Japanese artworks from 550 institutions around the world such as the Victoria and Albert Museum in London and the Stanford University Museum in California. There are famous ukiyo-e prints like Hokusai’s ‘The Great Wave off Kanagawa’, as well as ancient artefacts dating all the way back to the Jomon period (14,000-300 BC).”

Tohoku University: Digitized Works from Kokichi Kano Collection Now Open to General Public

Tohoku University: Digitized Works from Kokichi Kano Collection Now Open to General Public. “The Kano Collection was brought to Tohoku University through the efforts of Masataro Sawayanagi, the university’s first president and Kano’s close friend. It consists of about 108,000 books, most of which are Japanese and Chinese classics covering a variety of fields such as literature, philosophy, science, art and the military.” 232 works have been digitized and are now available online.

FEATURE: Museums to unite in preserving Japanese sports history (Kyodo News)

Kyodo News: FEATURE: Museums to unite in preserving Japanese sports history. “A sports museum in Tokyo is leading the way in the creation of a network with similar organizations across Japan, aiming to protect and preserve valuable pieces of the nation’s athletic history. That there is no shared system under which the pieces of memorabilia, including medals and reference materials, are organized is a major concern to people working at museums. Additionally, there is no universal list maintained by any public organization that indicates which institution holds any particular object.”