My Modern Met: Download 1,000+ Japanese Woodblock Prints by Edo-Era Master Hiroshige

My Modern Met: Download 1,000+ Japanese Woodblock Prints by Edo-Era Master Hiroshige . “The Minneapolis Institute of Art recently made their extensive digital collection of woodblock prints by Hiroshige available to view and even download via their website. Within this 1,000+ image archive are examples of his landscapes, cityscapes, portraits, and more—many of which influenced Impressionist and Post-Impressionist painters like Monet and Van Gogh.”

KBS World: Digital Archive on Japan’s Wartime Sexual Slavery to be Set up in UCLA

KBS World: Digital Archive on Japan’s Wartime Sexual Slavery to be Set up in UCLA. “A digital archive with translated primary sources and documentary evidence on Japan’s wartime sexual slavery is set to be established at the University of California, Los Angeles(UCLA). Comfort Women Action for Redress and Education(CARE), an advocacy group for the victims of Japan’s wartime sexual slavery, said Tuesday that the online archive will be set up at UCLA’s Center for Korean Studies as early as July. ”

The Mainichi: Kamikaze pilot museum in Japan launches online services for remote visitors

The Mainichi: Kamikaze pilot museum in Japan launches online services for remote visitors . “The online museum consists of 10-minute footage introducing the facility’s layout, plus three 5-minute video clips providing three curators’ commentaries on display items. The clips show photographs of suicide pilots and their farewell notes, laid in order of their departure on the attack missions. The footage also demonstrates the characteristics of the Imperial Japanese Army fighter Hayate, and a replica of the suicide attack boat Shinyo, which are both on display at the museum. Google Maps’ StreetView function also enables a 360-degree view of the facility’s interior.”

Google Blog: Discover the people behind Japanese gastronomy

Google Blog: Discover the people behind Japanese gastronomy. “In partnership with the Japanese Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, Google Arts & Culture is launching a new project about the incredible people behind the uniqueness of Japanese cuisine. You can check out their stories through 48 new exhibitions and more than a thousand unique images and videos.”

FEATURE:Efforts made to archive 2011 Japan disaster data to pass on lessons (Kyodo News)

Kyodo News: FEATURE:Efforts made to archive 2011 Japan disaster data to pass on lessons. “Entities in Japan have been stepping up efforts to archive data of the 2011 devastating quake-tsunami disaster in the northeast, such as documents, pictures and video footage to pass on lessons of the catastrophe as people’s memory fades. Their collections serve as useful sources of information for researchers, educators and members of the general public who wish to learn from the past.”

Unseen Japan: A wild theory about how the Japanese word for ‘I’ was corrupted by Allied occupiers leaves Japanese Twitter users shaking their heads.

I’m not 100% sure why I’m including this story. I think it’s a combination of interest in the idea that misinformation turns up in the oddest places, and an interest in how it’s refuted by crowd action. Anyway, Unseen Japan: A wild theory about how the Japanese word for ‘I’ was corrupted by Allied occupiers leaves Japanese Twitter users shaking their heads.. “Languages evolve constantly. I’ve discussed this evolution in past articles – e.g., the drift from ‘nippon’ to ‘nihon’ for the name of Japan. Many times, this influence is just a natural, internal progression. But sometimes, it happens through outside influence or even force. In Japan, one story about a supposed forced change in the way that people spell a simple Japanese word recently made the rounds on Twitter. However, in this case, the ‘change’ appears to be nothing more than a post-World War II conspiracy theory.”

TimeOut Tokyo: This free virtual gallery lets you curate your own online exhibition of Japanese art

TimeOut Tokyo: This free virtual gallery lets you curate your own online exhibition of Japanese art . “Cultural Japan uses the International Image Interoperability Framework, a database with over 500,000 digital versions of Japanese artworks from 550 institutions around the world such as the Victoria and Albert Museum in London and the Stanford University Museum in California. There are famous ukiyo-e prints like Hokusai’s ‘The Great Wave off Kanagawa’, as well as ancient artefacts dating all the way back to the Jomon period (14,000-300 BC).”

Tohoku University: Digitized Works from Kokichi Kano Collection Now Open to General Public

Tohoku University: Digitized Works from Kokichi Kano Collection Now Open to General Public. “The Kano Collection was brought to Tohoku University through the efforts of Masataro Sawayanagi, the university’s first president and Kano’s close friend. It consists of about 108,000 books, most of which are Japanese and Chinese classics covering a variety of fields such as literature, philosophy, science, art and the military.” 232 works have been digitized and are now available online.

FEATURE: Museums to unite in preserving Japanese sports history (Kyodo News)

Kyodo News: FEATURE: Museums to unite in preserving Japanese sports history. “A sports museum in Tokyo is leading the way in the creation of a network with similar organizations across Japan, aiming to protect and preserve valuable pieces of the nation’s athletic history. That there is no shared system under which the pieces of memorabilia, including medals and reference materials, are organized is a major concern to people working at museums. Additionally, there is no universal list maintained by any public organization that indicates which institution holds any particular object.”

Hankyoreh: S. Korea to release records showing Japan’s mobilization of Korean girls and women into forced labor

Hankyoreh: S. Korea to release records showing Japan’s mobilization of Korean girls and women into forced labor. “On the 75th anniversary of Korea’s liberation by US forces from Japanese the colonial occupation, the National Archives of Korea, the National Library of Korea, and the Northeast Asian History Foundation have released records from the colonial occupation related to the poorly known issue of the labor conscription of women and children. The archives also contained newspaper articles and other documents that were published in support of their conscription.”

New York Times: After Atomic Bombings, These Photographers Worked Under Mushroom Clouds

New York Times: After Atomic Bombings, These Photographers Worked Under Mushroom Clouds. “The idea of publishing in the United States images from the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings was first proposed to the University of Texas at Austin in 2017 by the Anti-Nuclear Photographers’ Movement of Japan, one of the organizations that have worked for decades to collect and preserve such photographs. The group was seeking an American publisher because it worried about rising tensions enveloping North Korea, Japan and the United States at the time, and it wanted to broadcast its antinuclear message to a wider audience. Through an intermediary, it approached the Texas university’s Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, whose collection includes photographs of the Vietnam War by the American photojournalist Eddie Adams….The center’s director, Don Carleton, said that while he initially worried that the Japanese group might use the project to ‘assign war guilt,’ it turned out […]

Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona: First database on the Imjin War now available

Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona: First database on the Imjin War now available. “The database covers a wide range of aspects of the Imjin War, such as information on prisoners, pottery produced during that period, Christianity, international relations, economics, the environment, Europe, identities, literature, military history, migrations, social history and trade. It allows analysing the human aspect of war, given that tens of thousands of Koreans were captured and sold to Japan as slaves, and many Japanese soldiers fell into the hands of the Chinese army and never returned to their country of origin. The project examines the trajectory of these people and how they were integrated into their new societies.”

Stars and Stripes Japan: If you can’t travel, here’s 11 virtual tours of Japan

Stars and Stripes Japan: If you can’t travel, here’s 11 virtual tours of Japan. “Let the power of technology, like virtual museum tours or live video feeds, decide where to visit on your next holiday—or help you pass your time during a spot of social distancing as coronavirus worries continue. Whether you’re already in Japan, scratching your head because of the closed attractions or still planning your next trip, these fantastic e-tours and live feeds will help you pass the time and maybe even add a few new places to your bucket list.”

British Library: Zuan-cho – Japanese design albums in the late Meiji Period

British Library: Zuan-cho – Japanese design albums in the late Meiji Period. “The Japanese Collection of the British Library includes around 50 Japanese pattern and design books. Thanks to a grant from the Great Britain Sasakawa Foundation, the Library is digitising many of these and making them available online. For a list of what is currently available see Japanese manuscripts and woodblock-printed books relating to design arranged by theme. This series of blog posts features some of the items in the collection, the artists who created them and the publishers who produced them.”