FEATURE: Museums to unite in preserving Japanese sports history (Kyodo News)

Kyodo News: FEATURE: Museums to unite in preserving Japanese sports history. “A sports museum in Tokyo is leading the way in the creation of a network with similar organizations across Japan, aiming to protect and preserve valuable pieces of the nation’s athletic history. That there is no shared system under which the pieces of memorabilia, including medals and reference materials, are organized is a major concern to people working at museums. Additionally, there is no universal list maintained by any public organization that indicates which institution holds any particular object.”

Hankyoreh: S. Korea to release records showing Japan’s mobilization of Korean girls and women into forced labor

Hankyoreh: S. Korea to release records showing Japan’s mobilization of Korean girls and women into forced labor. “On the 75th anniversary of Korea’s liberation by US forces from Japanese the colonial occupation, the National Archives of Korea, the National Library of Korea, and the Northeast Asian History Foundation have released records from the colonial occupation related to the poorly known issue of the labor conscription of women and children. The archives also contained newspaper articles and other documents that were published in support of their conscription.”

New York Times: After Atomic Bombings, These Photographers Worked Under Mushroom Clouds

New York Times: After Atomic Bombings, These Photographers Worked Under Mushroom Clouds. “The idea of publishing in the United States images from the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings was first proposed to the University of Texas at Austin in 2017 by the Anti-Nuclear Photographers’ Movement of Japan, one of the organizations that have worked for decades to collect and preserve such photographs. The group was seeking an American publisher because it worried about rising tensions enveloping North Korea, Japan and the United States at the time, and it wanted to broadcast its antinuclear message to a wider audience. Through an intermediary, it approached the Texas university’s Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, whose collection includes photographs of the Vietnam War by the American photojournalist Eddie Adams….The center’s director, Don Carleton, said that while he initially worried that the Japanese group might use the project to ‘assign war guilt,’ it turned out that the two sides had a simple goal in common: educating the public about the horrors of nuclear war. The association eventually agreed to make its photos available as a digital archive at the university, starting in 2021.” Warning: the pictures are horrifying.

Reuters: Japan government persists with ‘Abenomask’ giveaway, reignites social media outcry

Reuters: Japan government persists with ‘Abenomask’ giveaway, reignites social media outcry. “Japan’s government is pushing ahead with the distribution of its much derided masks even though commercially made masks are now readily available, prompting a renewed outcry on social media. Dubbed the ‘Abenomask’, which means Abe’s mask and is a pun on Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s ‘Abenomics’ programme, the washable gauze mask has been criticised as ill fitting with quality issues and as a waste of public money.”

TorrentFreak: Warning for Twitter Users in Japan Following Supreme Court Copyright Ruling

TorrentFreak: Warning for Twitter Users in Japan Following Supreme Court Copyright Ruling. “Twitter users in Japan are facing uncertainty after the Supreme Court ruled that people who retweet copyright-infringing images can have their details passed to copyright holders. The case centered around the posting of an image that was posted to Twitter without permission and was then retweeted in an automatically cropped format.”

The Guardian: Okinawa demands answers from US after 61 marines contract coronavirus

The Guardian: Okinawa demands answers from US after 61 marines contract coronavirus. “The governor of Okinawa island in Japan has demanded that a United States military commander take tougher prevention measures and have more transparency after officials were told more than 60 marines at two bases have been infected with the coronavirus over the past few days.”

Bloomberg: Lacking Legal Means, Japan Is Paying Night Clubs to Shut

Bloomberg: Lacking Legal Means, Japan Is Paying Night Clubs to Shut. “Nighttime businesses such as host clubs that close for at least 10 days will receive 500,000 yen ($4,664) per outlet from the Tokyo government, Asahi newspaper reported Thursday, citing an unidentified official. The city’s Toshima Ward had earlier asked the capital for such financial assistance. In southern Japan, Kagoshima prefecture, where more than 80 infections have been traced to one cabaret club, will pay up to 300,000 yen for night time entertainment establishments to close for two weeks starting Wednesday.”

Nippon: New Site for Learning Practical Japanese

Nippon: New Site for Learning Practical Japanese. “On June 1, the Agency for Cultural Affairs launched a new website for learning practical Japanese through video content. It is aimed primarily at people who have just moved to Japan and are learning the language for the first time or those who live in the country but have had no opportunity to study. Explanations and dialogue translations are available in English, simplified Chinese, Portuguese, Spanish, and Vietnamese.”

Kyodo News: Japan to build virus testing centers exclusive for int’l travelers

Kyodo News: Japan to build virus testing centers exclusive for int’l travelers. “Japan plans to set up new coronavirus testing centers at three major airports in Tokyo and Osaka, as well as in central parts of the cities, as the country prepares to relax its travel restrictions, health minister Katsunobu Kato said Thursday.”

Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona: First database on the Imjin War now available

Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona: First database on the Imjin War now available. “The database covers a wide range of aspects of the Imjin War, such as information on prisoners, pottery produced during that period, Christianity, international relations, economics, the environment, Europe, identities, literature, military history, migrations, social history and trade. It allows analysing the human aspect of war, given that tens of thousands of Koreans were captured and sold to Japan as slaves, and many Japanese soldiers fell into the hands of the Chinese army and never returned to their country of origin. The project examines the trajectory of these people and how they were integrated into their new societies.”

CityLab: In Japan and France, Riding Transit Looks Surprisingly Safe

CityLab: In Japan and France, Riding Transit Looks Surprisingly Safe. “Between May 9 and June 3, 150 clusters of new coronavirus cases emerged in France, according to the country’s national public health body. Defined as three cases or more of Covid-19 linked by contact, these clusters occurred largely in the sort of places you might predict they would: healthcare facilities, workplaces and homeless shelters — all sites where people mix in enclosed spaces for long periods of time and, in the case of hospitals, where people who are already infected are likely to congregate. What was striking however, was the number of clusters associated with public transit: There weren’t any. For almost a month, not a single Covid-19 cluster had emerged on France’s six metro systems, 26 tram and light rail networks or numerous urban bus routes.”

Nippon: Japan Govt Opens COVID-19 Support Finder Website

Nippon: Japan Govt Opens COVID-19 Support Finder Website. “The Japanese government Tuesday opened a website where users pick the type of problem they are facing over the novel coronavirus to look for support measures that match their needs. It can be accessed from the Cabinet Secretariat’s webpage on COVID-19 information. About 120 assistance measures provided by the government are listed on it.”

Stars and Stripes Japan: If you can’t travel, here’s 11 virtual tours of Japan

Stars and Stripes Japan: If you can’t travel, here’s 11 virtual tours of Japan. “Let the power of technology, like virtual museum tours or live video feeds, decide where to visit on your next holiday—or help you pass your time during a spot of social distancing as coronavirus worries continue. Whether you’re already in Japan, scratching your head because of the closed attractions or still planning your next trip, these fantastic e-tours and live feeds will help you pass the time and maybe even add a few new places to your bucket list.”

SoraNews: Japan’s poo museum opens online, offers turds of virtual fun worldwide during stay-home period

SoraNews 24: Japan’s poo museum opens online, offers turds of virtual fun worldwide during stay-home period . “It’s been just over a year since Japan opened a pop-up museum dedicated to all things poop in Yokohama, in Tokyo’s neighbouring Kanagawa Prefecture. Called the Unko Museum (literally ‘Poo Museum’), the pop-up proved to be so successful that it even slid into Tokyo afterwards, where it attracted crowds of turd lovers…until COVID-19 showed up in the capital, causing the facility to close its doors as a safety precaution. However, where one sphincter closes, another opens, and for the Unko Museum that means the Internet has opened up a new portal for the ‘Max Unko Kawaii’ extravaganza to be delivered to the poop-loving public.”

British Library: Zuan-cho – Japanese design albums in the late Meiji Period

British Library: Zuan-cho – Japanese design albums in the late Meiji Period. “The Japanese Collection of the British Library includes around 50 Japanese pattern and design books. Thanks to a grant from the Great Britain Sasakawa Foundation, the Library is digitising many of these and making them available online. For a list of what is currently available see Japanese manuscripts and woodblock-printed books relating to design arranged by theme. This series of blog posts features some of the items in the collection, the artists who created them and the publishers who produced them.”