Bloomberg: Lacking Legal Means, Japan Is Paying Night Clubs to Shut

Bloomberg: Lacking Legal Means, Japan Is Paying Night Clubs to Shut. “Nighttime businesses such as host clubs that close for at least 10 days will receive 500,000 yen ($4,664) per outlet from the Tokyo government, Asahi newspaper reported Thursday, citing an unidentified official. The city’s Toshima Ward had earlier asked the capital for such financial assistance. In southern Japan, Kagoshima prefecture, where more than 80 infections have been traced to one cabaret club, will pay up to 300,000 yen for night time entertainment establishments to close for two weeks starting Wednesday.”

Nippon: New Site for Learning Practical Japanese

Nippon: New Site for Learning Practical Japanese. “On June 1, the Agency for Cultural Affairs launched a new website for learning practical Japanese through video content. It is aimed primarily at people who have just moved to Japan and are learning the language for the first time or those who live in the country but have had no opportunity to study. Explanations and dialogue translations are available in English, simplified Chinese, Portuguese, Spanish, and Vietnamese.”

Kyodo News: Japan to build virus testing centers exclusive for int’l travelers

Kyodo News: Japan to build virus testing centers exclusive for int’l travelers. “Japan plans to set up new coronavirus testing centers at three major airports in Tokyo and Osaka, as well as in central parts of the cities, as the country prepares to relax its travel restrictions, health minister Katsunobu Kato said Thursday.”

Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona: First database on the Imjin War now available

Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona: First database on the Imjin War now available. “The database covers a wide range of aspects of the Imjin War, such as information on prisoners, pottery produced during that period, Christianity, international relations, economics, the environment, Europe, identities, literature, military history, migrations, social history and trade. It allows analysing the human aspect of war, given that tens of thousands of Koreans were captured and sold to Japan as slaves, and many Japanese soldiers fell into the hands of the Chinese army and never returned to their country of origin. The project examines the trajectory of these people and how they were integrated into their new societies.”

CityLab: In Japan and France, Riding Transit Looks Surprisingly Safe

CityLab: In Japan and France, Riding Transit Looks Surprisingly Safe. “Between May 9 and June 3, 150 clusters of new coronavirus cases emerged in France, according to the country’s national public health body. Defined as three cases or more of Covid-19 linked by contact, these clusters occurred largely in the sort of places you might predict they would: healthcare facilities, workplaces and homeless shelters — all sites where people mix in enclosed spaces for long periods of time and, in the case of hospitals, where people who are already infected are likely to congregate. What was striking however, was the number of clusters associated with public transit: There weren’t any. For almost a month, not a single Covid-19 cluster had emerged on France’s six metro systems, 26 tram and light rail networks or numerous urban bus routes.”

Nippon: Japan Govt Opens COVID-19 Support Finder Website

Nippon: Japan Govt Opens COVID-19 Support Finder Website. “The Japanese government Tuesday opened a website where users pick the type of problem they are facing over the novel coronavirus to look for support measures that match their needs. It can be accessed from the Cabinet Secretariat’s webpage on COVID-19 information. About 120 assistance measures provided by the government are listed on it.”

Stars and Stripes Japan: If you can’t travel, here’s 11 virtual tours of Japan

Stars and Stripes Japan: If you can’t travel, here’s 11 virtual tours of Japan. “Let the power of technology, like virtual museum tours or live video feeds, decide where to visit on your next holiday—or help you pass your time during a spot of social distancing as coronavirus worries continue. Whether you’re already in Japan, scratching your head because of the closed attractions or still planning your next trip, these fantastic e-tours and live feeds will help you pass the time and maybe even add a few new places to your bucket list.”

SoraNews: Japan’s poo museum opens online, offers turds of virtual fun worldwide during stay-home period

SoraNews 24: Japan’s poo museum opens online, offers turds of virtual fun worldwide during stay-home period . “It’s been just over a year since Japan opened a pop-up museum dedicated to all things poop in Yokohama, in Tokyo’s neighbouring Kanagawa Prefecture. Called the Unko Museum (literally ‘Poo Museum’), the pop-up proved to be so successful that it even slid into Tokyo afterwards, where it attracted crowds of turd lovers…until COVID-19 showed up in the capital, causing the facility to close its doors as a safety precaution. However, where one sphincter closes, another opens, and for the Unko Museum that means the Internet has opened up a new portal for the ‘Max Unko Kawaii’ extravaganza to be delivered to the poop-loving public.”

British Library: Zuan-cho – Japanese design albums in the late Meiji Period

British Library: Zuan-cho – Japanese design albums in the late Meiji Period. “The Japanese Collection of the British Library includes around 50 Japanese pattern and design books. Thanks to a grant from the Great Britain Sasakawa Foundation, the Library is digitising many of these and making them available online. For a list of what is currently available see Japanese manuscripts and woodblock-printed books relating to design arranged by theme. This series of blog posts features some of the items in the collection, the artists who created them and the publishers who produced them.”

Hindustan Times: Onoterusaki Shrine in Japan offers solace to those at home amid coronavirus pandemic lockdown

Hindustan Times: Onoterusaki Shrine in Japan offers solace to those at home amid coronavirus pandemic lockdown. “Shinto shrines, a go-to place for many Japanese to pray for good health and safety, have largely shuttered during the coronavirus pandemic. But one Tokyo shrine went online for those seeking solace. Onoterusaki Shrine in downtown Tokyo was live-streaming prayers on Twitter during a May 1-10 holiday, allowing those stuck at home to join rituals.”

GlobeNewswire: JAPAN HOUSE Los Angeles Launches Virtual Programming Featuring Their Most Popular Series on Manga Art, Food, Film & Flower Arranging (PRESS RELEASE)

GlobeNewswire: JAPAN HOUSE Los Angeles Launches Virtual Programming Featuring Their Most Popular Series on Manga Art, Food, Film & Flower Arranging (PRESS RELEASE). “JAPAN HOUSE Los Angeles, the premier Japanese cultural destination in the heart of Hollywood, is launching a virtual program featuring their most popular education and entertainment workshops, including expanded content, to enjoy at home during its temporary closure.” Cooking, Manga, flower arranging…

Getty Blogs: New on the Getty Research Portal: 900+ free digitized Japanese art exhibition catalogues

Getty Blogs: New on the Getty Research Portal: 900+ free digitized Japanese art exhibition catalogues. “While the physical holdings of our respective institutions may not be accessible at the moment, an ongoing collaboration between the Getty Research Institute (GRI) and the Tokyo National Research Institute for Cultural Properties (TNRICP) has resulted in the digitization of more than 900 exhibition catalogues on Japanese art, which are now freely available and downloadable on the Getty Research Portal. A Japanese announcement is also available.”

Slate: Somehow the Pandemic Hasn’t Stopped Sumo Wrestling

Slate: Somehow the Pandemic Hasn’t Stopped Sumo Wrestling. “On March 22, 35-year-old professional sumo wrestler Hakuho Sho gripped 34-year-old Kakuryu Rikisaburo in a powerful bear hug, glided across the floor, and launched his opponent outside of the ring. That final bout, which lasted less than 30 seconds, won Hakuho his 44th top-division championship. No roar of the crowd accompanied his achievement, however, because the seats were empty. The 15-day tournament in Osaka, Japan, did not have an audience because of the Japan Sumo Association’s coronavirus precautions.”

COVID-19: A 19th century Japanese ‘spirit’, Amabie, is going viral on Twitter in hopes for end to coronavirus pandemic (Gulf News)

Gulf News: COVID-19: A 19th century Japanese ‘spirit’, Amabie, is going viral on Twitter in hopes for end to coronavirus pandemic. “As many countries extend their coronavirus lockdown, a Japanese monster is going viral on Twitter, in hopes for an end to the pandemic. Recently, tweeps have been getting creative with images of a legendary 19th century Japanese yōkai or spirit that was said to have emerged from the sea and spoken of an epidemic. Many people across the globe have shared depictions of the amabie, that has apparently become a mascot of sorts, alongside messages wishing for a swift end to the spread of COVID-19.”

Coronavirus: Japan doctors warn of health system ‘break down’ as cases surge (BBC)

BBC: Coronavirus: Japan doctors warn of health system ‘break down’ as cases surge. “Doctors in Japan have warned that the country’s medical system could collapse amid a wave of new coronavirus cases. Emergency rooms have been unable to treat some patients with serious health conditions due to the extra burden caused by the virus, officials say. One ambulance carrying a patient with coronavirus symptoms was turned away by 80 hospitals before he could be seen.”