Now Available! The Japanese American Internment Sites: A Digital Archive (Berkeley)

Berkeley: Now Available! The Japanese American Internment Sites: A Digital Archive. “The project builds upon two previous grants conducted between 2011-2017 to digitize 100,000 documents from the Japanese American Evacuation and Resettlement Study and 150,000 original items from Bancroft’s archival collections including the personal papers of internees, correspondence, extensive photograph collections, maps, artworks and audiovisual materials. Together, these collections bring the total number of digitized and publicly available items to about 400,000 and form one of the premier sources of digital documentation on Japanese American Confinement found anywhere.”

California State University, Dominguez Hills: Japanese American Digitization Project Receives $238,520

California State University, Dominguez Hills: Japanese American Digitization Project Receives $238,520. “California State University, Dominguez Hills’ (CSUDH) Donald R. Beverly J. Gerth Archives and Special Collections has received a two-year $238,520 archival grant from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) to continue its work on the CSU Japanese American Digitization Project (CSUJAD). The NHPRC grant will support a project that makes accessible online 10,400 archival records from 19 collections featuring 20th century Japanese American history held at eight institutions throughout California.”

EIN Presswire: Over 100 Years of Japanese-American History (PRESS RELEASE)

EIN Presswire: Over 100 Years of Japanese-American History (PRESS RELEASE). “Over 100 years of Japanese-American history is now available online through Rafu Shimpo (羅府新報, the L.A. Japanese Daily News) Digital Archive, a new collection on East View’s Global Press Archive platform. Founded in 1903 to support the small but growing Japanese community in the Little Tokyo area of Los Angeles, California, Rafu Shimpo was published daily, with an English-language section added to the Sunday edition in 1926. By the 1940s the newspaper had grown to be the largest-circulation newspaper published in Japanese in the United States.”

Northeastern Illinois University Independent: NEIU’s Ronald Williams Library released a digital collection of the Japanese American Redress documents

Northeastern Illinois University Independent: NEIU’s Ronald Williams Library released a digital collection of the Japanese American Redress documents. “NEIU’s Ronald Williams Library released a digital collection of the Japanese American Redress documents that focused on the the Commission on the Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians (CWRIC) hearings. The CWRIC hearings took place on NEIU’s main campus on September 22-23, 1981.”

Voices in Confinement: A Digital Archive of Japanese American Internees (Berkeley)

Berkeley: Voices in Confinement: A Digital Archive of Japanese American Internees. “The Japanese American Evacuation and Resettlement Digital Archive is the result of a two-year grant generously funded by the National Park Service as part of the Japanese American Confinement Sites Grant Program. The grant titled, ‘Voices in Confinement: A Digital Archive of Japanese American Internees’, includes approximately 150,000 original items including the personal papers of internees, correspondence, extensive photograph collections, maps, artworks and audiovisual materials.”

New From Library of Congress: Japanese-American Internment Camp Newspapers, 1942 to 1946

Now available from the Library of Congress: Japanese-American Internment Camp Newspapers, 1942 to 1946. From the About page: “Produced by the Japanese-Americans interned at assembly centers and relocation centers around the country during World War II, these newspapers provide a unique look into the daily lives of the people who were held in these camps. They include articles written in English and Japanese, typed, handwritten and drawn. They advertise community events, provide logistical information about the camps and relocation, report on news from the community, and include editorials.”

Rafu Shimpo: Haynes Foundation Grant Preserves Photographs Documenting JA Life In LA

Rafu Shimpo: Haynes Foundation Grant Preserves Photographs Documenting JA Life In LA. “Specifically, the grant will be used to create the Ninomiya Photography Studio Collection Access Project at CSUDH and preserve, catalog, and archive approximately 10,000 packets of photographic negatives taken by the former studio, which was owned and operated by Japanese American photographer Ichiro Ninomiya in Little Tokyo. Dating between 1949 and 1970, the negatives document the daily life of Japanese Americans in Los Angeles during the mid-20th century — individual and family portraits, passport photos, pictures of Los Angeles architecture and Little Tokyo, women in traditional Japanese clothing, entertainers, and much more.”