British Library Blog: 40 more Javanese manuscripts now accessible online

British Library Blog: 40 more Javanese manuscripts now accessible online . “In May 2022 the Bollinger Javanese Manuscripts Digitisation Project was launched, aiming to digitise a further 120 Javanese manuscripts from the British Library collection. We are delighted to announce that 40 more Javanese manuscripts have now been published online, and can be accessed directly through the live hyperlinks on the Digital Access to Javanese Manuscripts page or via the Digitised Manuscripts portal.”

Wired: ‘The Internet Is on Fire’

Wired: ‘The Internet Is on Fire’ . “A VULNERABILITY IN a widely used logging library has become a full-blown security meltdown, affecting digital systems across the internet. Hackers are already attempting to exploit it, but even as fixes emerge, researchers warn that the flaw could have serious repercussions worldwide. The problem lies in Log4j, a ubiquitous, open source Apache logging framework that developers use to keep a record of activity within an application.”

Computer Business Review: GitHub Adds 10 Million New Users, Reveals 10 Most Popular Languages

Computer Business Review: GitHub Adds 10 Million New Users, Reveals 10 Most Popular Languages. “Over the past year, developers collaborated in a staggering 370 primary languages on GitHub. Among the top 10 programming languages, C#, Python and Shell climbed the list this year, while Ruby and Java fell in popularity. That’s according to the code repository’s annual Octoverse report, which also reveals a colossal 532 percent increase in the use of Google’s Dart language, as interest surges in the company’s Flutter SDK – built using Dart.”

British Library: Javanese manuscripts from Yogyakarta digitisation project completed

British Library: Javanese manuscripts from Yogyakarta digitisation project completed. “Over 30,000 digital images of Javanese manuscripts from Yogyakarta are now fully accessible online through the British Library’s Digitised Manuscripts website. The project, generously supported by Mr S P Lohia, has digitised 75 Javanese manuscripts held in the British Library from the collections of John Crawfurd and Colin Mackenzie, who both served in Java under Thomas Stamford Raffles, Lieutenant-Governor from 1811 to 1816. The manuscripts had been identified by historians Peter Carey and Merle Ricklefs as having been taken from the Kraton (palace) of Yogyakarta following a British attack in June 1812, when Crawfurd was Resident of Yogyakarta and Mackenzie was Chief Engineer of the British army in Java.” They are beautiful.

Google v. Oracle: Silicon Valley Braces for “Lawsuit of the Decade” as Google Petitions for Cert to decide API Copyrightability (JOLT Digest)

JOLT Digest: Google v. Oracle: Silicon Valley Braces for “Lawsuit of the Decade” as Google Petitions for Cert to decide API Copyrightability. “In January of 2019, Google petitioned for certiorari in Google LLC v Oracle America, Inc. The case concerned a copyright infringement claim filed by Oracle against Google for use of the Java API in Android smartphones. Oracle seeks damages that could exceed $8 billion.” A good overview of a legal situation that’s been going on for a long time.

British Library: 15,000 images of Javanese Manuscripts from Yogyakarta now online

British Library: 15,000 images of Javanese Manuscripts from Yogyakarta now online. “The Javanese Manuscripts from Yogyakarta Digitisation Project, generously supported by Mr S P Lohia, aims to digitise 75 manuscripts from Yogyakarta now held in the British Library, and provide free online access through the British Library’s Digitised Manuscripts website. Full sets of the digital images will also be presented to the Archives and Libraries Board of Yogyakarta (Badan Arsip dan Perpustakaan DIY) and to the National Library of Indonesia (Perpusnas) in Jakarta. Six months after the official launch of the project at the British Library on 20 March 2018 by Sri Sultan Hamengku Buwono X, over 15,000 images from 35 manuscripts are now accessible digitally, with all 75 manuscripts scheduled for full online publication by March 2019.” I mentioned this project back in March.

Eyerys: Researchers Created ‘Bayou’, An AI Capable In Writing Codes On Its Own

Eyerys: Researchers Created ‘Bayou’, An AI Capable In Writing Codes On Its Own. “It has been a goal for humans to create a computer software capable of creating other software on its own. And here, researchers have made than happen. Computer scientists at Rice University’s Intelligent Software Systems Laboratory has developed a deep learning AI that works like a search engine for codes. This AI is aimed to help programmers to write codes that contain Java application programming interfaces (APIs).”

eWeek: Google Volunteer Team Patches Thousands of Open-Source Projects

eWeek: Google Volunteer Team Patches Thousands of Open-Source Projects. “A 50-member team of Google engineers voluntarily worked to patch 2,600 open-source projects against a Java deserialization bug in 2016. A Google security researcher this week offered the first details on an effort by a 50-member volunteer team at the company last year to help patch more than 2,600 open-source projects against a critical vulnerability in a widely used Java process.”

Techdirt: Oracle Files Its Opening Brief As It Tries (Again) To Overturn Google’s Fair Use Win On Java APIs

Techdirt: Oracle Files Its Opening Brief As It Tries (Again) To Overturn Google’s Fair Use Win On Java APIs. “As was widely expected, back in October, Oracle announced its appeal of Google’s big fair use win, concerning its reuse of certain Java API components in Android. If you’ve been following this (long, long, long) case, you’ll recall that Google has won twice at the district court level. The first time, Judge William Alsup correctly noted that APIs were not subject to copyright, because copyright law clearly states that copyright protection does not apply to “any idea, procedure, process, system, method of operation, concept, principle, or discovery” and an API is a process, system or method of operation. However, the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit (CAFC), who only had jurisdiction over the case because it initially involved a patent issue, seemed unable to understand that an API is different […]

Oracle to Google: See You In Court – Again

Oracle just won’t let its case against Google go. “It was only a matter of time until this happened, but Oracle has officially appealed its fair use Java API loss to the Federal Circuit (CAFC). As you recall, after a years-long process, including the (correct) ruling that APIs are not covered by copyright being ridiculously overturned by CAFC, a new trial found that even if APIs are copyright-eligible, Google’s use was covered by fair use.”

Google Open-Sources Its Domain Registry Platform

Google has open-sourced its domain registry platform. “Nomulus is the platform it uses to manage all the registration data for domains that fall under its TLDs (think blog.google). Among other things, this platform handles all of the requests to buy, renew and transfer domains. While you may be buying a domain name from GoDaddy, for example, you’re really just using GoDaddy as an intermediary between you and the TLD’s owner.”

British Library Digitizes Collection of Javanese Manuscripts

The ‘Archive of Yogyakarta’ refers to a collection of some four hundred manuscript documents in Javanese dating from 1772 to 1813, originating from the court of Yogyakarta. A highly important source for the political, economic, social, administrative and legal history of central Java in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, the archive comprises official reports, letters, accounts and other documents as well as the private papers of Sultan Hamengkubuwana II (r. 1792-1810, 1811-1812, 1826-1828) and his successor Sultan Hamengkubuwana III (r. 1812-1814).

Oracle Cries Foul on Its Trial With Google

Oracle is crying foul on its trial with Google. “Oracle attorney Annette Hurst said that the launch of Google Play on Chrome OS, which happened in the middle of the trial, showed that Google was trying to break into the market for Java SE on desktops. In her view, that move dramatically changes the amount of market harm that Oracle experienced, and the evidence should have been shared with the jury.”

Google/Oracle Lawsuit: Google Prevails

Google has prevailed in the Google/Oracle lawsuit. “Google won a jury verdict that kills Oracle Corp.’s claim to a US$9 billion slice of the search giant’s Android phone business. Oracle contended that Google needed a license to use its Java programming language to develop Android, the operating system in 80 per cent of the world’s mobile devices. Jurors in San Francisco federal court on Thursday rejected that argument and concluded Google made fair use of the code under copyright law.”