Coronavirus crisis: More than $7.2 billion in unemployment compensation paid out to Ohioans in last 34 weeks (Cleveland 19 News)

Cleveland 19 News: Coronavirus crisis: More than $7.2 billion in unemployment compensation paid out to Ohioans in last 34 weeks. “The Ohio Department of Job and Family Services reported 21,868 people filed for initial unemployment last week (Nov. 1-7) to the U.S. Department of Labor, which brings the total of unemployment claims filed in Ohio over the last 34 weeks to 1,850,676.”

Becker’s Spine Review: 148 employers post more than 500 orthopedic positions on new website

Becker’s Spine Review: 148 employers post more than 500 orthopedic positions on new website. “The website was created by The Academic Orthopaedic Consortium in response to residents’ and fellows’ frustrations identifying jobs. It launched Nov. 2. The consortium’s membership base includes 140 university-based orthopedic programs, whose 2,700 members comprise orthopedic chairs, division chiefs, chief administrative officers, and 2,000 residents and fellows. The organization also has ties to more than 700 private orthopedic practices.”

Politico: How coronavirus is reshaping America’s job market

Politico: How coronavirus is reshaping America’s job market. “Just two-thirds of Americans were working for the same employer in September as they were in February, with the rest either landing new jobs or unemployed, according to the Real-Time Population Survey, a collaboration between researchers at Arizona State University and Virginia Commonwealth University. Brookings Institution researchers paint an even grimmer long-term picture, estimating that 42 percent of jobs lost due to Covid-19 will eventually be gone for good. Incomes are also dropping, indicating that many of these workers are transitioning into lower-paying jobs. More than 25 percent of U.S. workers earned less in September than they did in February, according to the Population Survey.”

New York Times: Out of Work in America

New York Times: Out of Work in America. “A conference call in which everyone on the line was laid off. An email declaring that a restaurant had served its last meal. A phone call from the boss before work saying to come in — and pack up all your things. In March and April, as the coronavirus began tearing through the country, Americans lost as many jobs as they did during the Great Depression and the Great Recession combined — 22 million jobs that were there one minute and gone the next. A job is a paycheck, an identity, a civic stabilizer, a future builder. During a pandemic, a job loss erases all that, when it is needed the most.”

Coronavirus crisis: More than $6.9 billion in unemployment compensation paid out to Ohioans in last 30 weeks (Cleveland 19)

Cleveland 19: Coronavirus crisis: More than $6.9 billion in unemployment compensation paid out to Ohioans in last 30 weeks. “The Ohio Department of Job and Family Services reported 20,090 people filed for initial unemployment last week (Oct. 4-10) to the U.S. Department of Labor, which brings the total of unemployment claims filed in Ohio over the last 30 weeks to 1,772,416. To put that total into perspective, the total number of claims for the last 30 weeks is more than the combined total of unemployment claims filed over the last four years, according to ODJFS.”

Washington Post: Millions brace for more layoffs, hunger and utility shutoffs as stimulus talks break down

Washington Post: Millions brace for more layoffs, hunger and utility shutoffs as stimulus talks break down. “Americans left in the lurch by President Trump’s sudden decision to abandon negotiations over a long-delayed stimulus package expressed disbelief, disgust and desperation Wednesday about Trump’s abrupt move. In interviews with The Washington Post, more than a dozen unemployed workers and struggling business owners affected by the move said that while they are familiar with Washington dysfunction, they are stunned by the latest decision by Trump and Republicans to break discussions off.”

No cold beer, no flowers, and no one to park the car: A shadow economy hits the skids as restaurant suppliers lose their jobs (The Counter)

The Counter: No cold beer, no flowers, and no one to park the car: A shadow economy hits the skids as restaurant suppliers lose their jobs. “Eight million Americans are employed in restaurant-adjacent industries, from linen washers to accountants to exterminators. How are they coping now?”

Carolina Public Press: Many NC employers, jobs not coming back when pandemic ends

Carolina Public Press: Many NC employers, jobs not coming back when pandemic ends. “North Carolina’s unemployment rate peaked at 12.9% in April. Though it dropped to 7.5% in June, it ticked up a percentage point in July, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Many of the missing jobs are in the service industry — and those whose work requires face-to-face contact are suffering the most.”

CNET: How COVID-19 is impacting jobs in the tech industry

CNET: How COVID-19 is impacting jobs in the tech industry. “COVID-19 has caused widespread economic damage to the tech sector, Indeed said in a report released Thursday. There are fewer tech job postings due to the coronavirus pandemic, while more people have been searching in the field, according to the job search website. Indeed, which looked through 564 tech-related job titles for the report, found data science was the hardest hit, with up to 51% fewer jobs advertised compared to a year ago for this role. Next was IT management, security and quality assurance, software development, system engineering, and IT operations and help desk.”

NIST: How Automation and AI May Help Level the Playing Field for Women in Manufacturing

NIST: How Automation and AI May Help Level the Playing Field for Women in Manufacturing. “Women make up about 29 percent of the manufacturing workforce despite filling 47 percent of the positions in the overall workforce, according to the Manufacturing Institute. While there have been periods of growth and decline, the dynamic is mostly unchanged since 1970, when women held 27 percent of the manufacturing jobs. But many experts say the growing adoption of automation and artificial intelligence (AI), combined with the critical need for knowledge-based workers, will create more opportunities for women in manufacturing.”

Crain’s Detroit Business: New digital hub to help Michigan workers displaced by pandemic boost skills

Crain’s Detroit Business: New digital hub to help Michigan workers displaced by pandemic boost skills. “A new digital hub offers online learning opportunities and other training resources for Michigan residents looking to return to work or learn new skills. The coronavirus crisis has created record unemployment in Michigan and across the country. The Michigan Department of Labor and Economic Opportunity says workers who possess advanced skills will be better positioned to get and keep higher-paying and more stable jobs.”

Deseret News: New tool aims to connect out-of-work Utahns to job training from colleges, companies

Deseret News: New tool aims to connect out-of-work Utahns to job training from colleges, companies. “A new online tool seeks to help Utahns who lost their jobs in the pandemic connect to training that could help them find work in sectors that are hiring, like technology, manufacturing and health care. Colleges in Utah have long offered certificate and training programs. But the business and education leaders behind the SkillUpUtah initiative say they created a one-stop shop for job seekers to browse those programs and others from companies like LinkedIn and Pluralsight.”

MIT Technology Review: An AI hiring firm says it can predict job hopping based on your interviews

MIT Technology Review: An AI hiring firm says it can predict job hopping based on your interviews. “As we’ve written before, the idea of ‘bias-free’ algorithms is highly misleading. But PredictiveHire’s latest research is troubling for a different reason. It is focused on building a new machine-learning model that seeks to predict a candidate’s likelihood of job hopping, the practice of changing jobs more frequently than an employer desires. The work follows the company’s recent peer-reviewed research that looked at how open-ended interview questions correlate with personality (in and of itself a highly contested practice).”