Route Fifty: Artificial Intelligence, Automation Aren’t Killing Labor Market, Reports Says

Route Fifty: Artificial Intelligence, Automation Aren’t Killing Labor Market, Reports Says. “The report examines decades’ worth of data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics across 10 industries—construction, leisure and hospitality, professional and business services, retail trade, transportation and warehousing, wholesale trade, financial activities, information, education and health services and manufacturing. The report found rates of job loss in each industry were lower in the third quarter of 2020 than in 1995. The third quarter of 2020 represented a stabilization of the American job market following a significant spike in job losses due to the pandemic that reached as high as 45% in the leisure and hospital industries.”

The Verge: Automated hiring software is mistakenly rejecting millions of viable job candidates

The Verge: Automated hiring software is mistakenly rejecting millions of viable job candidates. “Automated resume-scanning software is contributing to a ‘broken’ hiring system in the US, says a new report from Harvard Business School. Such software is used by employers to filter job applicants, but is mistakenly rejecting millions of viable candidates, say the study’s authors. It’s contributing to the problem of ‘hidden workers’ — individuals who are able and willing to work, but remain locked out of jobs by structural problems in the labor market.”

The Register: ‘It takes a hell of a mental toll’ – techies who lost work due to COVID share their stories

The Register: ‘It takes a hell of a mental toll’ – techies who lost work due to COVID share their stories. “Pat Christensen’s* COVID layoff came earlier in 2020, and at an earlier point in his career. As the year commenced, Christensen worked in New York State as a developer at a software vendor that was stretching towards security products. As the COVID-19 pandemic gathered pace in February and March, Christensen was promoted into a new role designed to help make that stretch – and was thrilled at the chance to move his career towards security. In May, the axe fell.”

Associated Press: Do we need humans for that job? Automation booms after COVID

Associated Press: Do we need humans for that job? Automation booms after COVID. “The pandemic didn’t just threaten Americans’ health when it slammed the U.S. in 2020—it may also have posed a long-term threat to many of their jobs. Faced with worker shortages and higher labor costs, companies are starting to automate service sector jobs that economists once considered safe, assuming that machines couldn’t easily provide the human contact they believed customers would demand.”

University of Maryland: Pitfalls of the TikTok Resume Trend

University of Maryland: Pitfalls of the TikTok Resume Trend . “Employers who use TikTok, Facebook, Twitter or other social networks to evaluate job candidates run certain risks, including overlooking potentially strong non-video savvy applicants or unwittingly succumbing to bias, Stevens says. Social media profiles and TikTok resumes almost always include user images, which can reveal the candidate’s age, race, weight and level of attractiveness – factors that are more easily obscured in a resume.”

Business Insider: An Oregon McDonald’s is so desperate for workers it hung a huge banner outside calling on 14-year-olds to apply

Business Insider: An Oregon McDonald’s is so desperate for workers it hung a huge banner outside calling on 14-year-olds to apply. “A McDonald’s in Medford, Oregon, has a banner out front advertising that it is hiring 14- and 15-year-old workers. ‘There are always staffing issues, but this is unheard of,’ the Biddle Road restaurant operator, Heather Coleman, told Insider. She said the situation is unique in her family’s 40-year history operating McDonald’s franchises.”

HuffPost: Coronavirus Pandemic Sparks Nurse Staffing Crisis At U.S. Hospitals

HuffPost: Coronavirus Pandemic Sparks Nurse Staffing Crisis At U.S. Hospitals. “The COVID-19 pandemic has created a nurse staffing crisis that is forcing many U.S. hospitals to pay top dollar to get the help they need to handle the crush of patients this summer. The problem, health leaders say, is twofold: Nurses are quitting or retiring, exhausted or demoralized by the crisis. And many are leaving for lucrative temporary jobs with traveling-nurse agencies that can pay $5,000 or more a week.”

Pacific Business News: New website connects Native Hawaiians in the tech industry

Pacific Business News: New website connects Native Hawaiians in the tech industry. “In April, [Emmit] Parubrub encountered a like-minded individual in Taylor Ho, a 31-year-old principal designer at Twitch, who like Parubrub grew up in Windward Oahu and was a transplant to California… They pooled their knowledge to launch Hawaiians in Technology, a digital directory for Native Hawaiians in tech jobs or those aspiring to get one. They also created a Hawaiians in Tech Discord channel for basic introductions. Requirements are fairly straightforward: people of Native Hawaiian ancestry, and people with tech jobs or tech aspirations.”

Wired: The Great Resignation is here and no one is prepared

Wired UK: The Great Resignation is here and no one is prepared. “Hard data is backing up this anecdotal evidence – workers are drafting up resignation emails, handing in their notices and heading for the exit door in their droves. The trend is worldwide. In the UK, job vacancies soared to an all-time high in July, with available posts surpassing one million for the first time. In the US, four million people quit their jobs in April – a 20-year high – followed by a record ten million jobs being available by the end of June. A Microsoft study has found that 41 per cent of the global workforce is considering leaving their employer this year.”

KAKE: These four Chick-fil-A locations closed their dining rooms because they didn’t have enough workers

KAKE: These four Chick-fil-A locations closed their dining rooms because they didn’t have enough workers. “In April, May and June the rate of quits per share of employment in the accommodation and food services sector, which includes restaurants, held steady at 5.7%, according to seasonally adjusted data released by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. That’s far higher than the quit rate across all sectors, which was 2.7% in June. Experts say that when restaurants are short-staffed, it can be even trickier to hire because of the stress placed on remaining employees, among other things.”

AP: Bus driver shortages are latest challenge hitting US schools

AP: Bus driver shortages are latest challenge hitting US schools. “A Montana school district is dangling $4,000 bonuses and inviting people to test drive big yellow school buses in hopes of enticing them to take a job that schools are struggling to fill as kids return to in-person classes. A Delaware school district offered to pay parents $700 to take care of their own transportation, and a Pittsburgh district delayed the start of classes and said hundreds more children would have to walk to school. Schools across the U.S. are offering hiring bonuses, providing the training needed to get a commercial driver’s license and increasing hourly pay to attract more drivers.”

Bleeping Computer: You can post LinkedIn jobs as almost ANY employer — so can attackers

Bleeping Computer: You can post LinkedIn jobs as almost ANY employer — so can attackers. “Anyone can create a job listing on the leading recruitment platform LinkedIn on behalf of just about any employer—no verification needed. And worse, the employer cannot easily take these down. Now, that might be nothing new, but the feature and lax verification on career websites pave the ways for attackers to post bogus listings for malicious purposes.”

Washington Post: Nearly a third of U.S. workers under 40 considered changing careers during the pandemic

Washington Post: Nearly a third of U.S. workers under 40 considered changing careers during the pandemic. “Nearly 1 in 3 American workers under 40 have thought about changing their occupation or field of work since the pandemic began, according to a Washington Post-Schar School poll, conducted July 6 to 21. About 1 in 5 workers overall have considered a professional shift, a signal that the pandemic has been a turning point for many, even those who did not contract the coronavirus.”

News on 6: Local Nonprofit Launches New Statewide Early Childhood Job Board

News on 6: Local Nonprofit Launches New Statewide Early Childhood Job Board. “A Tulsa nonprofit has launched a new online job board designed to help childcare facilities across the state find qualified workers. The new database allows job seekers to find an opportunity and childcare facilities to find the right candidates…. The database is free for employers to post open positions and for people looking for a job in childcare.”