Engadget: NIST preserve JFK assassination bullets with 3D scans (updated)

Engadget: NIST preserve JFK assassination bullets with 3D scans (updated). “The 56th anniversary of President John F. Kennedy’s assassination was last month. Early next year, you’ll be able to see, in almost nauseating detail, the bullets that took his life. The National Archives will upload high-definition 3D images of the projectiles to its online catalog.”

Office of the Historian, Foreign Service Institute Release of Foreign Relations of the United States, 1961–1963, Volumes VII, VIII, IX, Arms Control; National Security Policy; Foreign Economic Policy Microfiche Supplement (US Department of State)

US Department of State: Office of the Historian, Foreign Service Institute Release of Foreign Relations of the United States, 1961–1963, Volumes VII, VIII, IX, Arms Control; National Security Policy; Foreign Economic Policy Microfiche Supplement . “From 1993 to 1998, the Foreign Relations series published 13 microfiche supplements that included images of additional documents expanding upon issues addressed in corresponding print volumes in the Eisenhower and Kennedy subseries, which could not be printed due to space limitations. As an addition to the Office of the Historian’s digital archive of the entire Foreign Relations back catalog, the Office is digitizing the text from the microfiche images of these supplements and enriching it to create a full text searchable digital edition and ebooks.”

ABC News: Rare Kennedy photos go inside America’s most famous family

ABC News: Rare Kennedy photos go inside America’s most famous family. “The John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum has completed an 18-month project to catalog and digitize more than 1,700 vintage family snapshots, and they’re now all viewable online — a photographic fix that’s sure to feed the nation’s continuing obsession with Camelot.”

National Archives: New Group of JFK Assassination Documents Available to the Public

National Archives: New Group of JFK Assassination Documents Available to the Public. “In accordance with President Trump’s direction on October 26, 2017, the National Archives today posted 19,045 documents subject to the President John F. Kennedy Assassination Records Collection Act of 1992 (JFK Act). Released documents are available for download. The versions released today were processed by agencies in accordance with the President’s direction that agency heads be extremely circumspect in recommending any further postponement.”

Dallas News: New JFK files show FBI misplaced Oswald’s fingerprints, and CIA opened his mail — and John Steinbeck’s

Dallas News: New JFK files show FBI misplaced Oswald’s fingerprints, and CIA opened his mail — and John Steinbeck’s. “The National Archives unsealed thousands of pages from the Kennedy files on Friday [This was seven days ago, not today – TJC] And while assassinations buffs weren’t likely to find any major revelations — no proof of a second gunman, a Cuban plot, or evidence the killer could have been stopped — they’ll have plenty to chew on.”

Dallas News: Did Jack Ruby know? 10,000 more FBI records unsealed from JFK assassination files

Dallas News: Did Jack Ruby know? 10,000 more FBI records unsealed from JFK assassination files. “Yet again, the National Archives released a trove of records from the Kennedy assassination files on a Friday afternoon, another strange stream of loose ends, dead ends and tangents with little apparent connection to the assassination of the nation’s 35th president. Here and there, the odd curiosity did appear, offering insight into the effort to understand the circumstances of Kennedy’s murder but providing nothing to cast the official conclusions into doubt.”

BuzzFeed: CIA Reposts Bin Laden Documents After Removing 3,935 Files

BuzzFeed:
CIA Reposts Bin Laden Documents After Removing 3,935 Files
. “The CIA has reinstated internet access to its final archive of Osama bin Laden’s files after nearly a week, but hundreds of documents that were in the initial posting have been removed. The trove originally contained about 470,000 files when it was posted Nov. 1. But the new posting is 3,935 documents lighter, according to a list compiled by Emma Best, a national security journalist and archivist who downloaded the original fileset when it first became available and has made it available on the Internet Archive.”