Lad Bible: ‘Heist’ Caught On Google Maps Turns Out To Be Pranksters Holding A Glue Gun

Lad Bible: ‘Heist’ Caught On Google Maps Turns Out To Be Pranksters Holding A Glue Gun. “Darren Honeyman and his colleague of 15 years Dave Hutchinson were at work in Darlington, County Durham, earlier this year when they saw the the Google van coming. So, not wanting to miss the opportunity of a lifetime, the pair decided to create a scene especially for the camera. And they didn’t disappoint.”

April Fools’ Day 2021: Cauliflower Peeps, Duolingo toilet paper and more pranks (CNET)

CNET: April Fools’ Day 2021: Cauliflower Peeps, Duolingo toilet paper and more pranks. “April 1 is typically a day for silly jokes, and companies have put a lot of effort into trying to make people laugh. Last year was an exception, but some brands are venturing back into the realm of April Fools’ Day for 2021. We’re keeping an eye on the shenanigans all day and will update with the latest knee-slappers as they appear.”

Make Tech Easier: Here’s a Bunch of Funny Things to Ask Siri

For a given value of useful, but it’s Saturday, so.. Make Tech Easier: Here’s a Bunch of Funny Things to Ask Siri. “Siri is an extremely useful AI assistant, helping you in day-to-day tasks like making a calendar appointment or finding your iPhone. But there are plenty of other more whimsical uses for Siri too. This is especially true when it comes to kids, though adults will also enjoy the pile of nonsense questions you can throw at Siri. So we’ve gathered together a whole bunch of funny things to ask Siri when you’re bored and looking for a quick fix of fun. Some are kid-friendly, others aren’t. We’ll let you be the judge!”

Exclusive – Egyptians Turn to Jokes to Break Fear Barrier amid Coronavirus (Asharq Al-Awsat)

Asharq Al-Awsat: Exclusive – Egyptians Turn to Jokes to Break Fear Barrier amid Coronavirus. “Traffic in Cairo, which used to move at 11 kilometers an hour before the virus struck, has now reached humanly possible limits. The choice to remain in self-isolation is being laxly implemented during the day and turns into curfew at night at the order of the prime minister. This has weighed heavily on nighttime internet traffic. People have clamored to send and receive information about the pandemic, but above all else, they exchange jokes in order to break the barrier of fear.”

BuzzFeed News: Here Are The April Fools’ Jokes That Were Particularly Cruel This Year

BuzzFeed News: Here Are The April Fools’ Jokes That Were Particularly Cruel This Year. “Unless you’re a corporation or a cop with the cop password to your cop social media account, April Fools’ Day is something to be dreaded. This year, however, the day really outdid itself. Not only have big brands shared the usual cast of fake products, fake events, and troll-y food combinations, they’ve also pranked us with ideas that could, and should, exist.” If something is supposed to be an April Fool joke, and you announce it on March 29, that’s stupid.

Neowin: Microsoft isn’t making any April Fools’ Day jokes this year

Neowin: Microsoft isn’t making any April Fools’ Day jokes this year. “Microsoft seems to have acknowledged that April Fools’ Day pranks don’t always ring too well with customers, and Chris Capossela, the company’s Chief Marketing Officer, has sent out an internal memo to all the teams at Microsoft asking them not to engage in public-facing pranks, as reported by The Verge.” 100% this. Things are so crazy right now that purposely fronting wrong information seems really counterproductive.

Vox: Inside Venezuela’s YouTube prank economy

Vox: Inside Venezuela’s YouTube prank economy. “Venezuela makes sense as the epicenter for paid pranks. The country is in shambles — saddled with a rapidly atrophying economy and a penniless government. Inflation has risen by an incomprehensible 833,997 percent in the past 12 months, and the commercial consequences are outright dystopian. For instance, the Guardian reports that a chicken in the country currently costs about 14 million bolívares. Naturally, some Venezuelans have turned elsewhere — like the loose pockets of bored American teenagers — to make ends meet. Slime stunts and pie stunts don’t require a ton of overhead, and Betsy doesn’t hold back when I ask her how Fiverr contributes to her overall livelihood.”

Poynter: In the era of fake news, is April Fools’ Day funny anymore?

Poynter: In the era of fake news, is April Fools’ Day funny anymore?. “On April Fools’ Day, real news organizations used to publish fake news. The Capital Times reported in 1933 that the dome had toppled off the Wisconsin statehouse. In 1977, The Guardian published a lengthy travel feature story on the fictional San Serriffe islands. PC/Computing magazine covered a fake bill banning the use of the internet while drunk in 1994. But in 2018, April Fools’ Day feels different.”

Training a Neural Network to Tell Knock Knock Jokes

I saw some work of Janelle Shane’s on Tumblr and sent her a tweet expressing my appreciation. She jokingly replied, “Know anywhere I can find a huge database of knock-knock jokes?” and, well, you know how I am when someone asks about an online information collection. I gave her a collection of 200+ knock knock jokes and she used it to train a neural network. Thanks, Janelle. That was fun.

Smithsonian Starts Crowdsourced Project to Transcribe Phyllis Diller’s Jokes File

The Smithsonian has started a project to digitize the joke cards of Phyllis Diller. I did a bunch yesterday; I am a big Diller fan. “Phyllis Diller’s groundbreaking career as a stand-up comic spanned almost 50 years. Throughout her career she used a gag file to organize her material. Diller’s gag file consists of a steel cabinet with 48 drawers (along with a 3 drawer expansion) containing over 52,000 3-by-5 inch index cards, each holding a typewritten joke or gag. These index cards are organized alphabetically by subject, ranging from accessories to world affairs and covering almost everything in between.”

In Development: A Digital Archive of Humor from Victorian Times and Other Eras

In development: a digital archive of historical humor. (I believe I have mentioned this before, but this is a good overview article with plenty of Victorian-era jokes.) “Millions of people in Britain will pull a cracker on Christmas Day, don the paper crown within, and inflict an old joke like this on their families. For my long-suffering household this experience will be all too familiar – they put up with it all year around, as I research the history of Victorian jokes. This might seem like a rather unpromising topic. After all, we’re accustomed to thinking of the Victorians as a rather humourless bunch – a straitlaced society in the fashion of their queen, who was famously ‘not amused’. But this old stereotype isn’t really fair.” The humor seems like an odd mix of dad jokes and things you would see on Hee-Haw.