TNW: Learning during the quarantine: You can read JSTOR’s Open Access content without an account

TNW: Learning during the quarantine: You can read JSTOR’s Open Access content without an account. “Yesterday, JSTOR, the famous digital academic library, tweeted that 6,000 of its eBooks and over 150 journals are open for anyone to read. The organization noted it’s bringing out 26 public health journal archives, which you can read until June 30. For folks who previously haven’t had access to JSTOR’s library, you can now rifle through all its open access content without having to create an account.”

History News Network: JSTOR Interview Archive Help Preserve History

History News Network: JSTOR Interview Archive Help Preserve History. “The site is a fully-functioning prototype built by JSTOR Labs, a team at the digital library JSTOR that builds experimental tools for research and teaching. At this point, it contains the source interviews from a single documentary; enough, we think, to convey the concept and useful if you happen to be teaching or researching this specific topic. Our aim in releasing this prototype is to gauge interest in the idea.”

Understanding Great Works: a new research tool on JSTOR (JSTOR)

JSTOR: Understanding Great Works: a new research tool on JSTOR. “Understanding Great Works (Beta) is a free research tool from JSTOR Labs that fosters student engagement with classic literature by connecting passages in primary texts with journal articles and book chapters on JSTOR that cite those lines. Building on the success of the Understanding Shakespeare tool, Understanding Great Works encompasses several key works of British literature such as Frankenstein and Pride and Prejudice, the King James Bible, as well as all Shakespeare sonnets and plays.”

SLJ: JSTOR Text Analyzer

From Joyce Valenza at School Library Journal: JSTOR Text Analyzer. “JSTOR Labs recently announced Text Analyzer. If you have access to the JSTOR database, you’ll want share this new search strategy with your students and faculty. Upload or drag a document–an article, a Google document, a paper you are writing, a PDF or even an image–into what JSTOR is calling its magic box, and Text Analyzer will analyze it to identify prioritized terms.”

Shakespeare Tool Lets You Get Scholarship Line-by-Line

This is one of those “new to me” resources; don’t know how long it’s been around. Nice stuff, though: a JSTOR project that lets you get Shakespeare scholarship line by line. “Understanding Shakespeare is a collaborative project between JSTOR Labs and the Folger Shakespeare Library . It’s a research tool that allows students, educators and scholars to use the text of Shakespeare’s plays to quickly navigate into the scholarship written about them—line by line. Users simply click next to any line of text in a play and relevant articles from the JSTOR archive immediately load.”