New Database: Open Society Justice Initiative (HeinOnline Blog)

HeinOnline Blog: New Database: Open Society Justice Initiative. “To honor our core value of corporate citizenship, we are pleased to offer our newest database, Open Society Justice Initiative, a collection of materials free of charge to core American and international subscribers, and to the libraries of any other interested organizations or institutions…. The Justice Initiative publishes reports, handbooks, briefing papers, legal and policy submissions, and fact sheets exploring and advocating on issues of human rights and justice. Beyond its publications, the Justice Initiative represents individuals before domestic and international human rights tribunals.”

BBC: Rio Tinto ordered to rebuild ancient Aboriginal caves

BBC: Rio Tinto ordered to rebuild ancient Aboriginal caves. “Mining giant Rio Tinto must rebuild a 46,000-year-old Aboriginal cave system it blew up in May, an Australian parliamentary inquiry has said. The Juukan Gorge caves in Western Australia were destroyed as part of an iron ore exploration project. In a report released on Wednesday, the inquiry blasted Rio Tinto’s ‘inexcusable’ act, and said they should compensate the traditional owners.”

Vox: 80 percent of those who died of Covid-19 in Texas county jails were never convicted of a crime

Vox: 80 percent of those who died of Covid-19 in Texas county jails were never convicted of a crime. “Over 230 people have died from Covid-19 in Texas’s correctional facilities — and in county jails, nearly 80 percent of them were in pretrial detention and hadn’t even been convicted of a crime, according to a new report. A team of researchers at the University of Austin at Texas reviewed data from the the Texas Justice Initiative which collects information from multiple sources including the Texas Department of Criminal Justice (TDCJ). They found that at least 231 people have died of Covid-19 in the state’s correctional facilities between March and October.”

Hyperallergic: Mural Arts and the African American Museum in Philadelphia Present Rendering Justice

Hyperallergic: Mural Arts and the African American Museum in Philadelphia Present Rendering Justice. “Rendering Justice features a cohort of nine artists from across the country whose work highlights a broad range of issues bound in mass incarceration, with a particular focus on Philadelphia. While the number of people jailed and imprisoned by Philadelphia’s criminal justice system has declined dramatically in recent years, the city remains one of the most heavily incarcerated in the nation.”

Rwanda: Digitilisation of Gacaca Archives to Be Completed By June 2018 (AllAfrica)

All Africa: Rwanda: Digitilisation of Gacaca Archives to Be Completed By June 2018. “Work is being fast-tracked to ensure that the ongoing scanning and digitalisation of 63 million copies of Gacaca courts’s archives are completed in June next year. Dr Jean Damascène Bizimana, the Executive Secretary of the National Commission for the Fight against Genocide (CNLG) said this Tuesday as officials from CNLG and Aegis Trust, the British NGO which campaigns to prevent genocide worldwide, gave journalists a guided tour of the stores where they are kept at the Rwanda National Police headquarters in Kacyiru.”

TechCrunch: Google.org is committing $11.5 million to racial justice

TechCrunch: Google.org is committing $11.5 million to racial justice. “There is generally a lack of data in the criminal justice system. At the national level, for example, there is very little data about police behavior and criminal sentencing. That’s why Google.org is re-upping its commitment to racial justice through its $11.5 million in new grant money to ten racial justice organizations. This comes after Google.org awarded $3 million to organizations working to advance racial justice last year.”

Nebraska’s Supreme Court, Court of Appeals Decisions Go Online

The state of Nebraska’s Supreme Court and Court of Appeals decisions have gone online. “The pages have long since yellowed on first editions of Nebraska Reports that date back to 1871, when the state was in its toddler years and the Nebraska Supreme Court had newly formed….Some 145 years later, the cases could be all but forgotten to those not in the legal profession but for a project to go digital with all current Nebraska Supreme Court and Court of Appeals decisions. That led to the idea to create an online library of all the courts’ cases and offer it free to the public.”