WHYY: A new one-stop-shop for Pennsylvania education data

WHYY: A new one-stop-shop for Pennsylvania education data. “If you’re looking for an education-related figure, number, data point, or variable, chances are the new Pennsylvania School Data Project has you covered. Conceived as a repository for researchers, journalists, policy wonks, and school administrators, the new website hosts more than a dozen spreadsheets packed with education data. The nonprofit Research for Action — known as RFA — spent more than six months collating federal, state, and local data to make the new databank.”

The Power Of Digital: New Initiative To Expand Museums’ Capacity To Share Their Collections With K-12 Educators (Institute of Museum and Library Services)

Institute of Museum and Library Services: The Power Of Digital: New Initiative To Expand Museums’ Capacity To Share Their Collections With K-12 Educators. “The Institute of Museum and Library Services today announced the launch of a new special initiative focused on building the museum field’s capacity to connect with teachers and students. Museums for Digital Learning is a two-year cooperative agreement that enables museums to broadly share their digitized collections and other resources with K-12 schools across the country.”

Fox59: IPS digital collection will launch this week with access to photos and files dating back to 1800s

Fox59: IPS digital collection will launch this week with access to photos and files dating back to 1800s. ” Thousands of files and pictures depicting the history of Indianapolis Public Schools will be soon be available online. As part of The Indianapolis Public Library’s Digital Indy collection; researches, educators and alumni will be able to access archived items stretching back to the 1800’s. Downloadable items represent the 120 elementary and high schools that have comprised IPS and show the role they’ve played in shaping the city of Indianapolis.”

A little help from our academic friends: Five fine portals for instructional fodder (NeverEnding Search)

NeverEnding Search: A little help from our academic friends: Five fine portals for instructional fodder. “Need a little inspiration for the coming school year? How about a few fresh strategies for energizing your information literacy instruction and preparing your secondary learners for their academic experience? A number of portals offer training and instruction for our students as well as a little retooling for us as professionals, all aligned with the ACRL (Association of College & Research Libraries) Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education, which, of course, resonate with our own AASL National School Library Standards.”

MakeUseOf: The 10 Best Educational Apps for Kids on Every School Subject

MakeUseOf: The 10 Best Educational Apps for Kids on Every School Subject. “Most parents know that kids shouldn’t spend too much time in front of a smartphone or tablet. Indeed, several studies have linked excessive screen time with expressive speech problems. That’s why you need to limit your child’s screen time, and when they do have screen time, make sure they spend it in the best possible way. So rather than playing purely entertaining games for hours on end, why not help your kid’s development by engaging them with some of these educational apps for kids instead?”

EurekAlert: NSF funds Natural History Museum of Utah, College of Ed to develop online curriculum

EurekAlert: NSF funds Natural History Museum of Utah, College of Ed to develop online curriculum . “The National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded a grant with total funding expected to reach $1.3 million this month to the Natural History Museum of Utah and the College of Education at the University of Utah to develop and evaluate an on-line learning environment to support student learning in the biosciences.”

Forbes: U.S. Public Schools Have Lost Nearly 20% Of Their Librarians Since 2000

Forbes: U.S. Public Schools Have Lost Nearly 20% Of Their Librarians Since 2000. “The shortage in public school librarian employment — which saw the most dramatic drop following the Great Recession of 2008 and hasn’t recovered since — has hit districts serving minorities the hardest. Among all the districts that have retained all their librarians since 2005, 75% are white, Education Week reports. On the other end of the scale, student populations in the 20 districts that lost the most librarians in the same time comprised 78% students of color.”