The Guardian: Internet to be partially restored in Kashmir but social media ban stays

The Guardian: Internet to be partially restored in Kashmir but social media ban stays. “Internet is to be partially restored in Kashmir after an unprecedented five-month blackout, but only for institutions providing ‘essential services’, while social media sites will still be banned.”

Ars Technica: Indian Supreme Court finds 150-day Internet blackout in Kashmir illegal

Ars Technica: Indian Supreme Court finds 150-day Internet blackout in Kashmir illegal. “The Indian region of Kashmir has had most Internet service blacked out since August. The government of Narendra Modi says the online blackout is a necessary security measure in the face of growing unrest in the region triggered by a change in Kashmir’s status under the Indian constitution. (Kashmir’s status within India has been a topic of controversy for decades.)… But on Friday, India’s highest court rejected the government’s rationale, arguing that the blackout violated Indian telecommunications laws.”

The Diplomat: How to End the Internet Shutdown in Kashmir

The Diplomat: How to End the Internet Shutdown in Kashmir. “The contradictions in the availability of digital liberties in India continue to be glaring. Even as the state of Kerala declared the internet to be a basic right and approved a fiber optic network project to provide connectivity to every household in the state, Kashmir entered its fifth month of being in a digital void.”

Committee to Protect Journalists: India uses opaque legal process to suppress Kashmiri journalism, commentary on Twitter

Committee to Protect Journalists: India uses opaque legal process to suppress Kashmiri journalism, commentary on Twitter. “On August 10, 2018, the Indian government informed Twitter that an account belonging to Kashmir Narrator, a magazine based in Jammu and Kashmir, was breaking Indian law. The magazine had recently published a cover story on a Kashmiri militant who fought against Indian rule. By the end of the month, Indian police had arrested the journalist who wrote it, Aasif Sultan, and Twitter had withheld the magazine’s account in India, blocking local access to more than 5,000 tweets. “

Poynter: Misinformation doesn’t need a free and open internet to spread. Just look at Kashmir and Hong Kong.

Poynter: Misinformation doesn’t need a free and open internet to spread. Just look at Kashmir and Hong Kong.. “In Kashmir, misinformation has proliferated both in spite of and due to the absence of internet access in the region. But the Chinese government has taken the opposite approach, rapidly censoring pro-democracy speech on social media platforms and saturating the networks with propaganda and disinformation.”

New York Times: India Shut Down Kashmir’s Internet Access. Now, ‘We Cannot Do Anything.’

New York Times: India Shut Down Kashmir’s Internet Access. Now, ‘We Cannot Do Anything.’. “As the Indian government’s shutdown of internet and phone service in the contested region enters its 11th day, Kashmir has become paralyzed. Shopkeepers said that vital supplies like insulin and baby food, which they typically ordered online, were running out. Cash was scarce, as metal shutters covered the doors and windows of banks and A.T.M.s, which relied on the internet for every transaction. Doctors said they could not communicate with their patients.”

Kashmir Life: JTFRP to prepare artisan database of over 4 lakh craft artisans in JK

Kashmir Life: JTFRP to prepare artisan database of over 4 lakh craft artisans in JK. I think JK and J&K in this case are Jammu and Kashmir, in India. And of course one lakh is 100,000. “First of its kind, Jhelum and Tawi Flood Recovery Project (JTFRP) is going to prepare a comprehensive artisan database of more than four lakh artisans associated with different crafts in the state.”